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Old 02-15-2011, 07:40 PM
 
137 posts, read 570,765 times
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I'm looking to correspond with other parents regarding youth Hockey Organizations.
We are frustrated with our son's team and I want to see if others have had these same or similar experiences.
Any one ??
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:54 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,696,560 times
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Our son played youth hockey.
I have NO idea if we have "these same or similar experiences", because you did not mention any...
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Old 02-15-2011, 09:15 PM
 
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My son played too. We had no problem with the team or the coaches, but some of the parents in the stands would yell some pretty nasty stuff. I wasn't sorry when he switched to football in HS.
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Old 02-19-2011, 03:28 PM
 
137 posts, read 570,765 times
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Specifically - Here is the situation with my son's Bantam team.
At the beginning of the season there were two A Teams and two B Teams. A few weeks after evaluations were completed and teams were formed there was an announcement that there would be three A teams and only one B Team. At the time I was out of town on work for an extended period of time, so I never got the full details as to why this change occurred. The rumor as I understand it now is this ; the President of our club was to coach his son's team ( was B, changed to A ). It has been said that the change was made only so the Pres. could coach (and his son could be on) an A Team.
In the meantime, our coach ( of the remaining B Team ) stepped down as coach due to some political B.S. { this is an entirely different subject which I will address in another thread . }
My question would be - is there some legitimate reason to make this change and if the Pres. did indeed change things for his own ego's sake, what does USA Hockey have to say about it , if anything ?
Does anyone else have frustrating experiences with this type of self serving Board for their organization ?
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Old 02-19-2011, 03:48 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
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The changes depend on your bylaws, and most boards are self-serving.
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Old 02-20-2011, 05:51 AM
 
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It is one of those things that you ask yourself "in 10 years will this really matter"? Most likely the answer is no. While our kids don't play hockey, they have been involved in youth sports and I have been a coach at various levels for many years. It is the same everywhere. There is always a parent that thinks their child is the next megamillion dollar superstar and they will do whatever it takes to make sure everyone knows that.

Does moving to A really make sense, no, but then again, when they are competing against real A teams, their record will show that by the end of the season.

I also know that the superstar on a youth team very often does not end up being the high school superstar...
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Old 02-20-2011, 09:38 AM
 
11,614 posts, read 19,707,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
It is one of those things that you ask yourself "in 10 years will this really matter"? Most likely the answer is no. While our kids don't play hockey, they have been involved in youth sports and I have been a coach at various levels for many years. It is the same everywhere. There is always a parent that thinks their child is the next megamillion dollar superstar and they will do whatever it takes to make sure everyone knows that.

Does moving to A really make sense, no, but then again, when they are competing against real A teams, their record will show that by the end of the season.

I also know that the superstar on a youth team very often does not end up being the high school superstar...
Great post. I am also a sports parent (not hockey) and I see parents do crazy things all the time.

As far as the youth superstars not being the high school superstar AMEN TO THAT! My oldest son played on a very good youth football team. From that team the two "star" kids never made it past the JV level yet my son is a varsity starter and possible captain next year. He was a good solid youth player but not a superstar. In all the years he played youth football (7 seasons) he was chosen for the all star game only once.

The best thing parents can do with youth sports is to give their children the opportunity to participate at the highest level they are capable and STAY OUT OF THE DRAMA. Send them to camps. Send them to clinics. Let them try out for travel teams. Bring fruit, snacks and drinks and enjoy your kids emerging athleticism but for goodness sakes don't start any drama and don't engage in the drama of others. If you are unhappy just move. You don't need drama to move teams. Just do it. Your child will appreciate it.
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Old 10-26-2013, 07:47 PM
 
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Default Values of ice hockey

I grew up in a small town south of Boston, next to Rhode Islandís eastern border. My house is in a small neighborhood in this suburban town. I learned how to skate in my backyard, where my family built an ice rink every winter. We used plywood to make the boards, which were approximately 2 Ĺ feet high. Then we would put a large white tarp down and fill the space with water using the hose, then waited for it to freeze. I learned to skate alongside my two brothers and my two cousins. We learned by leaning on milk-crates for assistance, and also received guidance from my dad and uncle. Once I learned how to skate, I was signed up to learn how to play hockey. In my town, ice hockey was not a very popular sport when I was growing up. There were no town teams for young kids to play on, so I had to travel to a neighboring town to play. Even though I couldnít play in my town, I still loved the game.
When I was 10 I was playing in a game in Franklin, because that is where I played youth hockey, and I hit a player on the other team into the boards from behind. His head slammed against the boards with a loud thud, and then his body crumbled to the ice. This is a huge no-no in ice hockey, because of the high risk of neck injury involved from your head slamming into the boards the wrong way. As a result I was thrown out of the game. Luckily for me, the other player bounced right back up uninjured, and the game continued without me.
Some people think that ice hockey is too dangerous for kids to play, and that it breeds some kind of violent and aggressive attitude. Well, I canít deny that the sport uses aggression, because aggression is taught by coaches, and encouraged. Some of the main components of hockey is fighting, battling, and competing. You have to battle for the puck to take it away from opposing players by hitting, stick checking, and pinning. In the NHL you are allowed to fight the opponent. One of the more aggressive aspects of the game is checking, or hitting the opponent to knock them off-balance so that you can take the puck. So why would we want to have our children learn this aggression? While all of these things may seem extremely aggressive and violent, they really are not.
I can honestly say that this event changed my life. Not in a huge way, but it taught me a lesson. It taught me that I have to contain my aggression, and use it when it is the appropriate time. I realized that if I continued to check opposing players from behind, I would keep getting into trouble, would not get to play as much, and possibly hurt somebody. I was not trying to hurt the other player when I did this, and it helped me learn how to control and harness my aggression to use it safely and productively. This is a valuable lesson that every child who plays hockey when they are young learn, and most them donít even realize it.
This ability to constrain your aggression is one of many important life skills that can be learned by playing hockey. Many of the life skill that I have today come from playing hockey. Iím not a maniac who thrives off of violence and danger, and most people who grow up playing the sport arenít either. Why then do people think that ice hockey teaches children to be monsters? The truth of the matter is that ice hockey can teach children many important values and morals, which is just the opposite of some beliefs.
In Franklin youth hockey, there were tryouts held at the beginning of each season. Based on how well you did in this tryout, you were placed on a team in your age group labeled one through six. One being the team with the best players who would play the best team from surrounding towns, and six being the worst team playing the other worst teams. As a squirt, age 8-10 year olds, I played on the fourth team. I did not take this as a punishment. I took it as a hint, and as a motivator to be better. I played hard and practiced hard for the whole year. At tryouts the next year my improvement was felt and noticed, and I was placed on the peewee one team Ė 10-12 year olds. Hockey instilled in me a hardworking mentality and gave me the mindset of never giving up, always striving to be better. This hard work translated over into other aspects of my life, including schoolwork.
Finally, hockey also brought about new social situations in my life. Itís not too often that you will run into an anti-social hockey player. I used to be a very shy child, and kept to myself a lot. I wasnít anti-social, but still shy. This changed as I continued to play hockey because of the friendships and bonds that are made when being part of a team, and this is probably true for most sports. The one aspect that is different for hockey is the locker room. Since there is a large amount of time spent by the players dressing, there is plenty of time to socialize. In other sports itís not quite the same. Sometimes after games or practices, my teammates and I would spend up to 45 minutes undressing (to our parentsí displeasure) just talking and messing around. These were some of the most fun times I have had while playing hockey.
Much of who I am today has been shaped by playing ice hockey, and I like to think that Iím a good guy. It is clearly not correct to blame violence and aggression on hockey. Yes, hockey is an aggressive sport, and can be dangerous. However, if the game is played correctly, it is not dangerous because the true intent of the game is not to injure other players. If anything, hockey teaches children; what aggression is, and why it is not okay to abuse, as well as what danger is and how to avoid that. Through my experience with hockey I have found that it can teach children important life skills and values.
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Old 10-26-2013, 09:03 PM
 
12,913 posts, read 19,782,209 times
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I didn't have a problem with the players on the team my son played with. The ugliest aggression game out of the stands. There is something about that game that brings out the worst in parents.
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Old 10-29-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,730 posts, read 9,081,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
I didn't have a problem with the players on the team my son played with. The ugliest aggression game out of the stands. There is something about that game that brings out the worst in parents.
Boy do I agree with that. I live in a youth hockey mecca....and hockey is the sport for kids and parents want desperately their young ones to be involved for the social status. So I agree the kids are usually fine, but it is the parents that push and push to have their kids get more ice or give the coaches pressure for them to be on the travel team.
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