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Old 03-01-2011, 09:18 AM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,333,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladylolly View Post
When he had a child he did the Supernanny routine. Read to the child, kiss 'em good night and leave the room.. When his son got up again, he'd put him back in bed, kiss him, and leave the room. Every time he got up after that he'd silently put him back into bed and leave the room. It worked.. I only wish I'd known about that way back when.
I've never watched Supernanny, but that is exactly the way I was raised and it's the way I raised my kids. No drama. (Well, not much lol. Certainly not anywhere near the extent of the stories I'm hearing.) Bed time meant bed time. Period. They were taught Mom and Dad were tired (even if the kids weren't) and everyone needed to be quiet and sleep. Or at least lay in bed with a book or something.

Where did all this back rubbing, and all that seems to go along with it, come from?
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,954,304 times
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My dad rubbed my back while I went to sleep until I moved out of the house! As I got older, it became a time when we would talk quietly about the important things going on in my life. It was always a special time between us and I look back on it very fondly. The memory of it is also a big part of why I choose to have similar bedtime rituals with my children. My father died before my children were born, so they will never know him. But I hope that his gentle, loving ways will still be felt by them through me.
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:10 AM
 
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Thank you for sharing that ADVentive. So nice to have a story about a loving relationship between parent and child instead of the usual angst. You've warmed my heart. (I had a special relationship with my dad too.)
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Old 03-01-2011, 11:29 AM
 
Location: 3814′45″N 12237′53″W
4,152 posts, read 9,580,830 times
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Good grief. Bedtime at 8:30 for a 2.5 year old? My 5 year old & 8 year old's have an earlier bedtime!

No wonder

Buy this book, read it, commit it to memory. It is quite a bible around here.

Amazon.com: Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child (9780449004029): Marc Weissbluth: Books
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Old 03-01-2011, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,500,688 times
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We have almost 3 year old twin boys, and we've never had bedtime problems. They go through the same routine every night - pjs, then watch Olivia with lights dimmed, brush teeth, read a couple books, turn on lulaby music, give them each a book to read on their own with lights on, then we come back in about 20 min. and 99% of the time, they're snoring!

On the rare occassions when one of them would get out of bed and start getting into things, he either got spanked on the butt, or just the threat of it got him back into bed. They also get up every morning at 6 a.m., so they're normally tired by bedtime. They're in montessori school and then after school we play outside or go to the pool - anything to keep them active up until bed time.
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Old 03-02-2011, 06:05 AM
 
2,962 posts, read 2,872,099 times
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I'm a first-time father of an 11-month old. My child just started this new behavior of "clinging for dear life" prior to being put in the crib. My wife tells me that he started that behavior before his afternoon nap and then I saw it firsthand when I put him in his crib at bedtime (and at 12:30am and 4am...)

Is it just "latchiness"? I'll coax him back to sleep by rubbing his back and such. Within a few minutes, he'll wake up, see I'm gone and throw a tantrum. Is it just a stage?
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Old 03-02-2011, 09:45 PM
 
15,287 posts, read 16,839,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dspguy View Post
I'm a first-time father of an 11-month old. My child just started this new behavior of "clinging for dear life" prior to being put in the crib. My wife tells me that he started that behavior before his afternoon nap and then I saw it firsthand when I put him in his crib at bedtime (and at 12:30am and 4am...)

Is it just "latchiness"? I'll coax him back to sleep by rubbing his back and such. Within a few minutes, he'll wake up, see I'm gone and throw a tantrum. Is it just a stage?
At this age, your little one is probably developing separation anxiety. This is actually a sign of cognitive growth and it's very normal. He's not *throwing a tantrum* btw, he is just thinking enough to begin understanding that when you go away, you might not return. It is a phase and he will eventually outgrow it.

That said, there are a few things you can try to help him soothe himself to sleep. Every baby is different. Try white noise, soothing lullabies, perhaps a fish tank or other motion toy that may help him realize where he is and that he is safe.
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Old 03-03-2011, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Australia
1,492 posts, read 2,654,865 times
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How about making a rat wheel. You know those things that a pet mouse uses. Tire her out and generate electricity at the same time
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:28 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,711,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dspguy View Post
I'm a first-time father of an 11-month old. My child just started this new behavior of "clinging for dear life" prior to being put in the crib. My wife tells me that he started that behavior before his afternoon nap and then I saw it firsthand when I put him in his crib at bedtime (and at 12:30am and 4am...)

Is it just "latchiness"? I'll coax him back to sleep by rubbing his back and such. Within a few minutes, he'll wake up, see I'm gone and throw a tantrum. Is it just a stage?
He could be having nightmares which he now associates with his cage or sleep. Their imaginations can be very active and nightmares can be very intense.
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,189 posts, read 14,068,763 times
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So, what is her day like from start to finish at 8:30 pm as I am sure the answer lies within those boundaries. A child can be too tired to sleep and all wound up. If she is getting up early enough and not napping for an extended time, I would take her to the doctor and explain the child is awake 20 hours a day if that is the case because something would need to be done. You will have to tough it out for awhile and refrain from getting up with her and taking her downstairs. Perhaps the one that goes to work could make up a bed temporarily in a quiet place. I knew someone that had this problem and thought a new baby would help and that was not the answer.
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