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Old 03-06-2011, 07:58 PM
 
874 posts, read 1,350,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Sounds like the kids are just curious. They are obviously noticing something - so why not just educate them? Once it's "out there" I'd think that at the very least speculative gossiping would stop....I don't see where telling them it's "none of their business" will gain him anything. I'd think he'd be best off being honest and informative - rather than defensive. Might some kids tease him? Maybe but I'd guess most won't. And those who would, most likely would no matter what he said. The rest most likely will just start understanding that that is just "him"....
this person pretty much summed it up.
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Old 03-06-2011, 08:31 PM
 
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My best friend teaches 4th grade in a public school and always remarks abou how sensitive her students are to other students with disabilities. They are growing up in a world where 1 in 4 Americans is projected to have some sort of disability by the year 2025- it's not as "weird" to them to run across an Autistic classmate or classmates with other various differences.

I'd encourage him to be honest and just be himself!
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Old 03-06-2011, 08:59 PM
 
Location: BK All Day
4,480 posts, read 8,327,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
My best friend teaches 4th grade in a public school and always remarks abou how sensitive her students are to other students with disabilities. They are growing up in a world where 1 in 4 Americans is projected to have some sort of disability by the year 2025- it's not as "weird" to them to run across an Autistic classmate or classmates with other various differences.

I'd encourage him to be honest and just be himself!
I agree.

I went to school with a girl that had one ear. Trust me, it's the weirdest thing you will ever come across in your life. She was always really open about it. She often wore her hair down however.
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Old 03-06-2011, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,696,241 times
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Had a friend with a child in a wheelchair. Early in grade school she asked me to help her put together some kind of demonstration for school since she liked the way I handled the adoption lesson I did for my own daughter.

We decorated the wheelchair with streamers and balloons and let the students take turns riding down the hall in the wheelchair while the child sat in a regular chair. We taught the kids how the hand mechanisms worked, told them why the child had to be in the chair and discussed some of the challenges he faced and how they could help if they saw he was ever in need. The kids were delighted, the child felt great to help his friends learns about his illness AND TRANSPORTATION AND IT HELPED TO EASE ALL THE STARES AND QUESTIONS HE ONCE HAD FACED.
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Old 03-06-2011, 10:45 PM
 
Location: BK All Day
4,480 posts, read 8,327,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post

We decorated the wheelchair with streamers and balloons and let the students take turns riding down the hall in the wheelchair while the child sat in a regular chair. We taught the kids how the hand mechanisms worked, told them why the child had to be in the chair and discussed some of the challenges he faced and how they could help if they saw he was ever in need. The kids were delighted, the child felt great to help his friends learns about his illness AND TRANSPORTATION AND IT HELPED TO EASE ALL THE STARES AND QUESTIONS HE ONCE HAD FACED.
We did a demonstration about my sister's allergies. My sister was in kindergarden long before the time of having allergies was trendy and many people did not understand it. We had a video called "Alexander the Elephant who couldn't eat peanuts" that the food allergy network sent us.

I would assume a tourettes support group has similar resources.
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Old 03-06-2011, 11:00 PM
 
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I'd encourage him to be honest. The kids already are suspecting his specific disorder. What's the point in denying it when it's obvious?

Kids who would make fun of him would make fun of him whether he told them or not. Most are probably just curious.
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Old 03-07-2011, 01:27 AM
 
Location: Milford, DE
6 posts, read 7,774 times
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I agree that you should tell his classmates about his disorder and educate them. Disabilities are more and more common although as parents with children that have disabilities it hurts us when another child points it out to them. After all our child just wants to be like everyone else but the truth is they aren't and the more educated other children and adults as well are about his disorder and other disorders that face people the more we will be able to help them live and strive for a happy "normal" life.
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Old 03-07-2011, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Back in MADISON Wi thank God!
1,047 posts, read 3,241,650 times
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I agree with all above. What has worked great in our school, we have had the parents of children with some disability to send an email to the whole school, educating the other parents on whatever it is. That way, all the parents are also aware, and can help answer questions about it to their own kids. I think it draws more attention when something is kept quiet. Education and understanding of an issue brings it in the open and the mystery is gone and life can go on.
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Old 03-07-2011, 08:20 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,019,169 times
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I agree with everyone who said this could be a great opportunity for kids to learn something about Tourette's and see it as something that real people have (therefore helping to normalize it), and what it actually means. In movies, people with Tourette's always blurt out obscenities, but real people may have different kind of tics. Some make noises or twitch a certain way. Kids can learn what Tourette's really looks like and why it happens. I think a lot of them will be able to empathize with your child. Some may be mean, but they would probably be mean no matter what. Your son will have more kids on his side who will know what's going on, and they may stand up for him.
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Old 03-07-2011, 09:41 AM
 
1,425 posts, read 3,526,569 times
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If he approached it matter-of-factly, the kids are more likely to take it that way too. If a child is going to tease, they do not need a 'reason', they will find their own. Actually, if he shows he is ashamed of it, it may *spark* someone into teasing just to get a reaction.

I was in 5th grade with a boy with Tourettes. He was one of the most popular boys in school.

BTW, one of the finalist on American Idol has tourettes, it may help show his friends what tourettes is without being on display.
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