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Old 03-18-2011, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Denver area
21,148 posts, read 22,139,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
What's exactly different between the experience of listening to an iPod or listening to say cassettes on a Walkman? The Walkman came out in 1979 and when cassettes died out it was quickly replaced with portable CD players. Portable radios with headphones have been around a lot longer than that. Plain and simple, people have been pumping music of their choice into their heads through headphones for the better part of 30 years now. The only thing that has changed is the medium the music is stored on.

And before that, teens just shut themselves in their room and listened to the record player or stereo and pondered the misery and angst that was their life.
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Old 03-18-2011, 03:05 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,368,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
And before that, teens just shut themselves in their room and listened to the record player or stereo and pondered the misery and angst that was their life.
This is true. Though the noise drove my parents to buy us all headphones for Christmas one year. We'd clamp them on our heads and be oblivious to the outside world while we pondered how horrible the establishment was. If my mother wanted to get out attention she used to flick the overhead light on an off a dozen times to get our attention. It meant "If you can pull yourself away from Jim Morrison for 10 minutes, dinner is ready."
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Old 03-18-2011, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Nothing is really different between an ipod and a walkman.

But the iphone and all its aps really takes the cake...so many distracting games and internet venues - you never have to look up once to see the world and people around you.
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Old 03-19-2011, 02:21 AM
 
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I don't mind our kids listening to their music. I totally understand that part of it. I remember being a teenager and escaping away to my music (Sony Sports CD Walkman, yellow, with these giant squishy headphones lol ). But what raises red flags is when they behave disrespectfully when we won't jump and run to replace broken headphones. When they seem out of control because they suddenly can't listen to their music anymore. When they admit that they really don't feel they can go 24 hours without their mp3 player - and they mean it. That seems unhealthy to me.

But, is this simply the way things are now with the new breed of human? If you were born in the 90's, are you destined to be a slave to poorly produced overpriced hyped-up igadgets, world-omitting earbuds, and eensy-weensy qwerty keyboards and thumbless gloves for the rest of your life?
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Old 03-19-2011, 06:15 AM
 
Location: UK
2,579 posts, read 2,134,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
I don't mind our kids listening to their music. I totally understand that part of it. I remember being a teenager and escaping away to my music (Sony Sports CD Walkman, yellow, with these giant squishy headphones lol ). But what raises red flags is when they behave disrespectfully when we won't jump and run to replace broken headphones. When they seem out of control because they suddenly can't listen to their music anymore. When they admit that they really don't feel they can go 24 hours without their mp3 player - and they mean it. That seems unhealthy to me.

But, is this simply the way things are now with the new breed of human? If you were born in the 90's, are you destined to be a slave to poorly produced overpriced hyped-up igadgets, world-omitting earbuds, and eensy-weensy qwerty keyboards and thumbless gloves for the rest of your life?


I totally agree with you.

This point is raised in the book.

It also talks a lot about the fact that our children may be more connected with the world through all the gadgets but they are actually losing the ability to communicate.
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Old 03-19-2011, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Denver area
21,148 posts, read 22,139,461 times
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Hmmm....here's my perspective....

Sometimes teens will be disrespectful (part of the growing up process) and it is up to us as parents to correct that. It doesn't have anything to do with the gadgets. Gadgets don't cause disrespectful behavior or poor attitude.

While I agree that there is definitely such thing as "too much" stuff and connectivity that too is something to learn how to accomplish. I don't think that labeling technology as evil and forcing people to "do without" is the answer. There are good things to it too. We don't live near family but because of facebook and skype, my kids can be more in touch with family (grandparents, cousins, aunts and uncles - even some who live overseas) than I was able to be growing up. My DD, away at college, calls me on her cell phone between classes many a day at lunch time just to talk - to share something funny that happened or whatever. My DS can text me from a friends house to let me know that he forgot to tell me he got a good grade on his Calc test earlier. In the fall, I took DS on a "road trip" just the two of us. We had no cell service much of the time and he forgot to pack his earbuds. No tantrums were thrown. We passes several Walmarts along the way and he didn't care to go in and replace them. His choice. It isn't the gadgets that are the issue. It's all about balance in our lives. But isn't that true with anything? Not just gadgets. Too much work, too much sports, too much food, too much TV, too much sitting in your room sulking or even reading? None of that is good either. Teach balance.

As a teen (and even today if I get the chance) I'd shut out everyone by sticking my nose in a book and tuning out. I had to learn that there were times that was appropriate and times that it was rude. No one threatened to take books away for 6 months to teach me that I could live without books.

Last edited by maciesmom; 03-19-2011 at 08:28 AM..
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Old 03-19-2011, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Westchester County
1,096 posts, read 1,343,883 times
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Technology is ok as long as it is in moderation. The computer and cell phone have become necessary tools in today's world, and now to take them away from your children is considered child abuse (I joke about that now, but I guarantee in the next 5 years we will hear of such a case). That said I also feel that the parent has to be on top of this and regulate the behavior as they see fit.
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Old 03-21-2011, 12:05 AM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,733,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SKP440 View Post
Technology is ok as long as it is in moderation. The computer and cell phone have become necessary tools in today's world, and now to take them away from your children is considered child abuse (I joke about that now, but I guarantee in the next 5 years we will hear of such a case). That said I also feel that the parent has to be on top of this and regulate the behavior as they see fit.
It's no joke, really. Our son lost his internet privileges once (30 days no laptop) and one of his teacher's found out and spoke with me about it, explaining to me that his grades could suffer if he doesn't have internet at home. They were like, "He REALLY NEEDS to have the internet at home, isn't there a different punishment that can be arranged?" I explained to the teacher that he had the computers and internet connection at school and at the local public library (which is right across the street from school) to do his homework with. He abused his internet privileges at home, so that's why he lost them for a month. We believe that the punishment should relate to the offense. You abuse it, you lose it. The teacher wasn't happy, but I was a little irritated, too... it's really none of their business so long as he keeps his grades up and is in class every day, which he does/is.
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Old 03-21-2011, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,164 posts, read 1,688,159 times
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A life without constant texting and the bothers of being constantly connected seems kinda nice to me. I HATE always being reachable and would like to just relax and disappear for a while. I really like music but could live without my mp3 player if I chose to do so. I noticed that without these hi-tech gadgets, I was more aware of my surroundings and more likely to do other things (talking to others, reading, etc.). Going "off the grid" would be paradise.
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Old 03-21-2011, 05:22 AM
 
Location: Wherever life takes me.
5,956 posts, read 6,389,608 times
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What I don't get is why you all are talking about disconnecting from the gadgets that keep us connected to people when connecting to people is what those gadgets do.

Why must I be involved with my current surroundings when I may not even want to connect in that surrounding?
When I am with my friends I hardly text, unless like its been an ongoing conversation but then again the text are few and far between.

But when I am out and about and around strangers and stuff I DON'T want to connect with people I don't know. I hate most people, most people are annoying, immature and have their heads crammed up their own butts. I don't want to chat and be friendly with strangers I just want to be by myself and get my stuff done.

Today my shift over lapped with the midday dude, so I stuck in my head phones and went outside to change the trash, it was nice and warm out, I had my music, and I thought about this thread as I worked, I thought, I am UNPLUGGED right now. That's my unplugged.

If you're "going off the grid" wouldn't you be unaware of things, immersed in yourself.

Some people may like to talk to total strangers in public but I like to be left alone.
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