U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-06-2011, 06:15 AM
 
1,302 posts, read 1,532,937 times
Reputation: 1916

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
This is reassuring, thanks...because I am almost 100% certain that my kids will be nowhere close to being good at any team sport. For now, I am just desperate to come up with ways to make them get outside and just run around. Today I took them out in the yard, and they dragged some darn books with them.

I just keep hearing all this storm about sports practice, left and right, but it hardly occurred to me that by a certain age, the sport would have to get serious so only the really good athletes would make the team.
Pardon the ignorance, I just don't know much about youth sports because I've never had an interest in them and nobody I knew growing up did beyond the informal, unsupervised ball kicking in the school-yard that my brother would sometimes do.

For now, I don't think we need to worry about "making the team" because we won't even come close to the team, let alone "making it".
Youth soccer, particularly at the very young ages, is wonderful. When they are 5 or 6 there is no real distinction of anyone with athletic ability. It is simply adorable to watch a bunch of kids running like a herd of cattle chasing a ball. There is no goalie and just a round net.

Sports like soccer when they are young is not just about athleticism. It is about building teamwork and playing with others. It also gets the kids out and running around which a lot of them wouldn't do without it.

You don't have to become the hyper-competitive, obsessed soccer (or any other sport) family, it is just a couple of hours a week letting the kids have fun and play. You never know, your kids may fall into a niche they never knew they had.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-06-2011, 06:22 AM
 
11,616 posts, read 19,764,670 times
Reputation: 12056
Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
(No time to drill my multiplication tables because I've got soccer practice? Are you kidding me?).
I am not sure this is a reasonable statement. During football season my youngest is out of school at 3, he has practice at 6:30. There is plenty of time for schoolwork even in sports where the kids practice daily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
All of these families cannot possibly have children who are incredible athletes and who would otherwise become a waste/get into gang activity, etc.
Many of them play because they LOVE it. Is that so hard to fathom. Neither of my very athletic kids will be professional athletes. They play because they love to play. They are not future gang members either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
I do agree that people with children who are very athletically endowed should be pursuing that route because it is obvious they need to be doing that rather than struggle to make it in life with academics.
Obvious to whom? Some athletes are quite good students.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
But just like academically gifted children, these athletically gifted children are few and far between. The rest just seem to get more involved than they should in sports while dealing only superficially with academics.
Not all athletes deal superficially with academics. Some do but not all, and certainly not most. I am not sure why you don't think it's ok to play just because a child loves it? Just because you don't love it, that doesn't mean someone else will not love it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
Otherwise, if you say my kids won't be ridiculed, singled out, excluded, you name it - because they are not athletes...it's all cool.
(No, they are not overweight...which is certainly not to say that if they were, other kids should have a license to do the above; oh, well - YKWIM).
Your kids will find their niche with or without sports. Other kids may find a way to single them out, but it probably won't be because they don't like sports.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 07:52 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,520,691 times
Reputation: 4494
Syracusa, if your post about soccer conflicting with multiplication practice referred to my comments in the math thread, I think you misunderstood my point.

My son has plenty of time to do a reasonable amount of homework for his grade level AND attend a couple of hours of practice per week. My concerns are two-fold: EM is unfocused and doesn't demand fact mastery; and his school's overall curriculum requires age-innapropriate independent projects (in other subjects) that are clearly above his head and take time away from the foundational work I think is essential for his age group.

My family is not disorganized or putting sports ahead of academics, and we have prioritized math fact practice because we know how important mastery is to his continued study of mathematics.

That said, I also think regular exercise and play are part of a healthy, well-rounded childhood. The low-key, no travel league in which we participate is fun for our entire family.

Regarding your concern about your children being excluded for not participating in organized sports, I don't think it will be an issue. Once your children are in school, there will be plenty of opportunities for them to meet and bond with other kids that don't involve an athletic field.

Last edited by formercalifornian; 04-06-2011 at 08:26 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 09:13 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,493,680 times
Reputation: 10476
Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
This is reassuring, thanks...because I am almost 100% certain that my kids will be nowhere close to being good at any team sport. For now, I am just desperate to come up with ways to make them get outside and just run around. Today I took them out in the yard, and they dragged some darn books with them.

I just keep hearing all this storm about sports practice, left and right, but it hardly occurred to me that by a certain age, the sport would have to get serious so only the really good athletes would make the team.
Pardon the ignorance, I just don't know much about youth sports because I've never had an interest in them and nobody I knew growing up did beyond the informal, unsupervised ball kicking in the school-yard that my brother would sometimes do.

For now, I don't think we need to worry about "making the team" because we won't even come close to the team, let alone "making it".
There are plenty of rec opportunities for kids that just want to play for fun or to get exercise. Our high school golf team has a developmental squad, for example, where kids that just want to be on a team or learn to play the game can join. We have about 20 girls each year on that squad. They pay $90 for 4 practices/week of 3 months-its a great deal. Most of them don't really care if they "make" a team, they just like being part of the team. Our high school also has a whole host of intermural teams that are just for fun. They have games after school once or twice/week, the kids come up with silly uniforms and just play for the heck of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeavingMassachusetts View Post
Youth soccer, particularly at the very young ages, is wonderful. When they are 5 or 6 there is no real distinction of anyone with athletic ability. It is simply adorable to watch a bunch of kids running like a herd of cattle chasing a ball. There is no goalie and just a round net.

Sports like soccer when they are young is not just about athleticism. It is about building teamwork and playing with others. It also gets the kids out and running around which a lot of them wouldn't do without it.

You don't have to become the hyper-competitive, obsessed soccer (or any other sport) family, it is just a couple of hours a week letting the kids have fun and play. You never know, your kids may fall into a niche they never knew they had.
I don't know about that, I have seen some pretty psycho competitive parents of 4 and 5 year old out there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
MJGoat,

You are right. I may have over-stated it and I was partially joking. I am just often flabbergasted to see how many families make organized sports an absolute priority when other important things (check the Math thread) are left un-tackled. (No time to drill my multiplication tables because I've got soccer practice? Are you kidding me?).

All of these families cannot possibly have children who are incredible athletes and who would otherwise become a waste/get into gang activity, etc.

I do agree that people with children who are very athletically endowed should be pursuing that route because it is obvious they need to be doing that rather than struggle to make it in life with academics. But just like academically gifted children, these athletically gifted children are few and far between. The rest just seem to get more involved than they should in sports while dealing only superficially with academics.
This is my only gripe. Just too much cultural emphasis on sports, overall.

Otherwise, if you say my kids won't be ridiculed, singled out, excluded, you name it - because they are not athletes...it's all cool.
(No, they are not overweight...which is certainly not to say that if they were, other kids should have a license to do the above; oh, well - YKWIM).
Academics and athletics are NOT mutually exclusive. I think you will find that the opposite is true at most high schools across the nation. I think the exceptions you find at the division I level for a couple men's sports, Football and basketball specifically tend to make the news more than the 4.0 Rhodes' Scholars you find. Our girls golf team had a cumulative GPA of 3.9 out of a 4.0 scale last year. My DD's 3.8 brought the average down . Our top students year after year after year are all athletes. Our top athletes are getting into sluff colleges like Cornell, Harvard, Notre Dame, etc.

Our Dd will get golf scholarship offers, great, however, she will also get plenty of academic offers as well. We have told her for years that she needs to go to the school that is the best fit for her and if that means she plays DIII golf vs DI golf, so be it--but part of that "fit" is who is going to give her the most money.

The most popular and successful activity at our high school, however, is the marching band .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 09:30 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,520,691 times
Reputation: 4494
SOME soccer parents are crazy, but the vast majority are well-balanced. Coaches set the tone, so start there. If the information isn't offered, ask any prospective coach to explain his philosophy and how s/he handles aggressive parents. If you don't like what you hear, keep looking. There is absolutely no reason to subject your child to an abusive experience from either coaches or other parents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,051 posts, read 99,018,950 times
Reputation: 31544
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
There are plenty of rec opportunities for kids that just want to play for fun or to get exercise. Our high school golf team has a developmental squad, for example, where kids that just want to be on a team or learn to play the game can join. We have about 20 girls each year on that squad. They pay $90 for 4 practices/week of 3 months-its a great deal. Most of them don't really care if they "make" a team, they just like being part of the team. Our high school also has a whole host of intermural teams that are just for fun. They have games after school once or twice/week, the kids come up with silly uniforms and just play for the heck of it.
Most districts don't start the interscholastic sports until about 8th grade. Before that, it's intramurals in middle school. That's how my daughter got her love of soccer, while she was doing competitive club gymnastics, which morphed into high school gymnastics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 07:17 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,493,680 times
Reputation: 10476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most districts don't start the interscholastic sports until about 8th grade. Before that, it's intramurals in middle school. That's how my daughter got her love of soccer, while she was doing competitive club gymnastics, which morphed into high school gymnastics.
In our state you are allowed to play interscholastic sports in 7th grade, if you make the team. Our middle schools have an "interscholastic" program with the other middle schools in our area for some sports-soccer, football, basketball, track, softball and baseball. Our town has rec leagues starting in 1st grade-8th grade and the high schools have intermurals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2011, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,051 posts, read 99,018,950 times
Reputation: 31544
That is similar to what is happening in my town. Plus, there's the rec center, where you can go to "open gym" and "open swim" to shoot baskets, run the track, swim, etc just for fun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2011, 09:07 AM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,305,462 times
Reputation: 45831
I think another aspect of this is how we've programmed every single minute of our children's lives with activities. What is this compulsion we've acquired as a society that we have to fill up their free time with stuff to do? I sure don't want my kids watching the idiot box all day, but whatever happened to just letting kids hang out with other kids?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2011, 09:16 AM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,597,131 times
Reputation: 14280
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
I think another aspect of this is how we've programmed every single minute of our children's lives with activities. What is this compulsion we've acquired as a society that we have to fill up their free time with stuff to do? I sure don't want my kids watching the idiot box all day, but whatever happened to just letting kids hang out with other kids?
I think this is a good point and some people certainly feel the need to create ultra involved ubermensch's that do nothing but bounce from activity to activity. I think the difference needs to lie with what the childs interest's are and supporting them in pursuing the same. However, at the same time parents need to keep their kids from becoming overburdened with things to do.

For instance my son played football, hockey and baseball this year, each in a different season. He wasn't really into football, but he was really into hockey. I personally think playing two major commitment sports a year is a lot for a 6 year old, so we won't be doing football again to give him some more free time to be a kid.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top