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Old 04-03-2011, 09:04 PM
 
11,615 posts, read 19,738,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Another perspective....

I generally stayed at practice and watched when my son played sports (one sport per season). I learned a lot about the sport and was able to follow the game and better appreciate my son's progress in the sport over the years. Also met a number of other parents. Some of whom became very good friends with whom we still socialize today - even though our sons go to different high schools or don't run with the same crowd. None of the coaches were paid when my son played and parents were often utilized as helpers - be it timing runs, putting color coded tape on football helmets...there was often something that could be done (some sports more than others though - football - lots and lots of stuff; basketball - hardly anything). I don't regret any of the hours I spent watching practice.
I don't disagree with this perspective but the OP is having a problem getting the things done in his (her?) life that he wants to do. The hours spent watching practice could be used to get those things done.

As a SAHP I can get most of my stuff done during the time the kids are in school and spend some time at the field. When both parents are working that can be difficult and the hours the kids are at practice can be used to catch up on things.
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,028 posts, read 98,908,697 times
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^^My kids practiced gymnastics three times a week. I rarely went to practice. However, I went to every home meet, most of the away meets, and was a strong parent volunteer.
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Denver area
21,147 posts, read 22,139,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I don't disagree with this perspective but the OP is having a problem getting the things done in his (her?) life that he wants to do. The hours spent watching practice could be used to get those things done.

As a SAHP I can get most of my stuff done during the time the kids are in school and spend some time at the field. When both parents are working that can be difficult and the hours the kids are at practice can be used to catch up on things.
Yes, I should have clarified that I was really posting not in response to the OP but to the thoughts that parents really shouldn't be there:

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
When we were growing up sports took place during the day in the summer or right after school during the school year. They were coached by paid coaches, NOT PARENTS. Parents NEVER attended practices and usually only went to home games. It was SO much better because it was all about the kids, not the parents and how they were "better" parents because their child was an athlete.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cleasach View Post
I think the issue is that today's kids are driven everywhere. No one really lets their kid ride his bike for the mile or two to the field of play so every time there is an event, the adults have to put everything on hold (chores, etc.) and drive their kids to practice or games.
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:25 PM
 
Location: here
24,477 posts, read 28,773,973 times
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I think it really depends on the age of the child, the type of activity, how well you know the coach, and if the coach is a volunteer or paid. That is a lot of variables.
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Old 04-03-2011, 10:54 PM
 
Location: New York metropolitan area
65 posts, read 58,156 times
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I'd urge you to go to a quiet place, calmly discern what's most important and summon the resolve to act on it. If the usual suburban idols (what they call "extracurricular activities") are really that exhausting and exasperating and deplete your family time so much, be done with them. Cut them off and replace them with something else. Turn the athletic activities into canoeing together, playing tennis together, or working out together, the key word in each case being together. Undertake to discover what people did centuries ago to grow together as family; see if that gives you ideas. And be open about your concerns for togetherness as a family, and mention getting to know each other better, building character, et cetera (in your own words). And let your concerns be purposes, because if you embark on activities hoping for magic, they will probably peter out in the dust eventually.
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Old 04-03-2011, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^What was the reason to knock the suburbs in that post? It's not as if this doesn't go on in city neighborhoods, too.
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Old 04-04-2011, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Wherever life takes me.
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I miss high school sports.
I played year round, I played soccer in the summer, swam in the winter and alternated what I did in the spring, usually track.

Everyday after school I had practice, so that was 5 times a week, with games on the weekends and sometimes during the week.

When I lived in NY, we got out of school at 1:55 and didn't start practice till 3, after school let out we would all head down to our coaches classroom (he was a teacher too) and we would sit and do homework after changing into our stuff for an hour and then head down to the field.
Here in CO practice was right after school but school lets out here at like 2:45 and practice would start at 3.

Either way practice only ever went till about 5 or 6, home in time for dinner and homework.
My brother has also been in hockey all while I played soccer, so my mom always put his practice/games as a priority and rarely went to mine, I still hope that maybe if I start rec soccer back up maybe she'll come to a few games of mine, not because I want attention but I want to see that she cares as much about me as she does my brother cause I really don't feel she does.
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Old 04-04-2011, 01:03 AM
 
Location: New York metropolitan area
65 posts, read 58,156 times
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The original post was about the effect of so-called "extracurricular activities" on one person's family life. I think that's more a suburban phenomenon than either a rural or an urban one, because "extracurricular activities" loom largest in that environment. I can see many ways in which organic activity, the spice of life, speaks more loudly and clearly to a person's inner self in rural and urban settings, for example in situations that call for the harnessing of one's basic survival skills (these situations are sometimes desirable, sometimes not). In the suburbs there is a dearth of organic activity, and so we focus more on the made-to-order "activity" that takes its place. Its artificial quality is neatly suggested by the subcategory "extracurricular," as if the institution of school were a measuring stick for the things we do both inside and outside its walls.
I think what I mean to say in brief is that "extracurricular activities" are overrated in suburbs; plain old genuine activity and a good philosophy consistent with lived experience can make for a full life, and those are more easily had in rural or urban areas.
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Old 04-04-2011, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,028 posts, read 98,908,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigGuy77 View Post
The original post was about the effect of so-called "extracurricular activities" on one person's family life. I think that's more a suburban phenomenon than either a rural or an urban one, because "extracurricular activities" loom largest in that environment. I can see many ways in which organic activity, the spice of life, speaks more loudly and clearly to a person's inner self in rural and urban settings, for example in situations that call for the harnessing of one's basic survival skills (these situations are sometimes desirable, sometimes not). In the suburbs there is a dearth of organic activity, and so we focus more on the made-to-order "activity" that takes its place. Its artificial quality is neatly suggested by the subcategory "extracurricular," as if the institution of school were a measuring stick for the things we do both inside and outside its walls.
I think what I mean to say in brief is that "extracurricular activities" are overrated in suburbs; plain old genuine activity and a good philosophy consistent with lived experience can make for a full life, and those are more easily had in rural or urban areas.
Oh, for crying out loud! City/rural kids go to school, do the same kinds of activities that suburban kids do. Are we really supposed to believe it's that different, that city kids for some reason just run around the parks or play "pick up" games, instead of doing organized sports? The rural kids these days are not going home to work on the farm, either.

Demographics | Ag 101 | Agriculture | US EPA

There are over 285,000,000 people living in the United States. Of that population, less than 1% claim farming as an occupation (and about 2% actually live on farms). There are only about 960,000 persons claiming farming as their principal occupation and a similar number of farmers claiming some other principal occupation. The number of farms in the U.S. stands at about two million.

This is obviously from an old census; there are likely fewer people living on farms now.

A perusal of the high school sports section of your local paper will discredit this nutty idea. Basketball is particularly popular in the rural parts of Indiana and Illinois, for example.
http://webcache.googleusercontent.co...www.google.com
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Old 04-04-2011, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,028 posts, read 98,908,697 times
Reputation: 31481
Just in time for this thread, from the Pittsburgh forum:

Quote:
Originally Posted by wpipkins View Post
I am a black male (professional). I own my own home (in the hood). I have a wife (who is black) and two beautiful black children. My children attend PPS (Fulton French Magnet) and they are recieving an excellent education from teachers and adminstrators who care. I choose not to live in the suburbs because I love the city and all it has to offer. I volunteer my time to improve my community. I do not put others down to make myself feel better. My children also participate in urban athletic leagues. My wife and I along with many other married black parents volunteer with our youth football and baseball leagues. We show disadvantaged inner city kids an alternative to what they know. We open our homes to them. By seeing a normal functioning BLACK family, may help them make better choices in the future.
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