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Old 04-05-2011, 06:58 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,563,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigGuy77 View Post
The original post was about the effect of so-called "extracurricular activities" on one person's family life. I think that's more a suburban phenomenon than either a rural or an urban one, because "extracurricular activities" loom largest in that environment. I can see many ways in which organic activity, the spice of life, speaks more loudly and clearly to a person's inner self in rural and urban settings, for example in situations that call for the harnessing of one's basic survival skills (these situations are sometimes desirable, sometimes not). In the suburbs there is a dearth of organic activity, and so we focus more on the made-to-order "activity" that takes its place. Its artificial quality is neatly suggested by the subcategory "extracurricular," as if the institution of school were a measuring stick for the things we do both inside and outside its walls.
I think what I mean to say in brief is that "extracurricular activities" are overrated in suburbs; plain old genuine activity and a good philosophy consistent with lived experience can make for a full life, and those are more easily had in rural or urban areas.
Having lived in rural, suburban and urban areas I say this is totally FALSE. In fact, the most rabid parents we ever encountered were from a "city" school, to the point of one parent TRIPPING a player from the opposing team (our team) during a basketball game. This is NOT unique to suburbs in any way shape or form.
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Old 04-05-2011, 09:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
I think it really depends on the age of the child, the type of activity, how well you know the coach, and if the coach is a volunteer or paid. That is a lot of variables.
Agree.

When our son was little, he did inline hockey through the city. I drove him to practice and would wait because there really wasn't enough time to really get anything done. We also always went to his games. (Helps to only have one!).

Fourth grade he started ski racing. We would just drop him off at the ski office and they would all go up in vans to the hill. The coaches (paid) really didn't like the parents at practice because many parents thought just because they could ski, they knew how to race and would undo what the coaches were trying to accomplish.

When he got older we would sometimes not even go the races because they were too far away and it was too expensive for us to stay over as well.

The most valuable thing he learned from all of that - independence. Well, and some good skiing.
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Old 04-05-2011, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,096 posts, read 99,210,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Having lived in rural, suburban and urban areas I say this is totally FALSE. In fact, the most rabid parents we ever encountered were from a "city" school, to the point of one parent TRIPPING a player from the opposing team (our team) during a basketball game. This is NOT unique to suburbs in any way shape or form.
We had an opposite experience once at a gymnastics meet. The rural parents were ringing cowbells (indoors), yelling, carrying on, while the parents from one urban high school sat their politely. I do agree it's everywhere.
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Old 04-05-2011, 09:51 AM
 
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If you think you have it bad, you should try ice hockey. My son played this year and my wife and I felt like we were in boot camp with the early morning practices and crazy travel schedule. Worst part is, he loved it....and the coach was thrilled with how good he was....and wants him on the A squad next year....workouts start in June....and he's only 6.
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Old 04-05-2011, 09:53 AM
 
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I wish for one year, our wonderful sports addicted nation would eliminate sports in public schools. I know it will never happen but one can only wish. Can you imagine how much test scores would skyrocket? Oh, wait, most students who play in sports automatically get above average grades anyway. At least in our school they do. As soon as sports are over, grades mysteriously drop. Our so called "star" athlete is at the top of the honor roll list during football and basketball. As soon as those are over, his name doesn't even appear on the honor roll list. hmmmm...make's ya wonder
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Old 04-05-2011, 10:23 AM
 
11,617 posts, read 19,792,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magoomafoo View Post
I wish for one year, our wonderful sports addicted nation would eliminate sports in public schools. I know it will never happen but one can only wish. Can you imagine how much test scores would skyrocket? Oh, wait, most students who play in sports automatically get above average grades anyway. At least in our school they do. As soon as sports are over, grades mysteriously drop. Our so called "star" athlete is at the top of the honor roll list during football and basketball. As soon as those are over, his name doesn't even appear on the honor roll list. hmmmm...make's ya wonder
Do your football/basketball coaches have mandatory study halls? Our kids have mandatory study time in season. Before practice the kids are expected to be there studying, doing homework, etc....If they are not there they must report to the coaches where they were. If they go to see a teacher for extra help they have to notify the coach AND they have to return with a note from the teacher.

The good students are expected to tutor the struggling one. It's considered a team responsibility to make sure nobody is deemed academically ineligible.

My son's friend got a solid B in math in the first semester (football season). He failed math in the third quarter and he swears that it's because the study halls and support of his team mates helped him during the season. He and my son are back to having study sessions together and he is doing better in the 4th quarter.

Sports can help the kids grades if the coaches are supportive. This spring there is no practice on Wed during spring football. The coach wants the kids to have time to study during the spring football season. Some kids do better when they are busy. Others do well only when they have a reason to do well.
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Old 04-05-2011, 10:28 AM
 
1,302 posts, read 1,535,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magoomafoo View Post
I wish for one year, our wonderful sports addicted nation would eliminate sports in public schools. I know it will never happen but one can only wish. Can you imagine how much test scores would skyrocket? Oh, wait, most students who play in sports automatically get above average grades anyway. At least in our school they do. As soon as sports are over, grades mysteriously drop. Our so called "star" athlete is at the top of the honor roll list during football and basketball. As soon as those are over, his name doesn't even appear on the honor roll list. hmmmm...make's ya wonder
Dear God, don't EVER let this happen. Sports are an integral part of a lot of kids lives and they would be lost without them. So very many kids would go down the wrong path without sports in their lives. My sons would not be the men they are today without them, the lessons they learned were invaluable.

I don't regret a single second I spent at practices, games, meets etc...I miss them
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Old 04-05-2011, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Denver 'burbs
21,168 posts, read 22,209,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magoomafoo View Post
I wish for one year, our wonderful sports addicted nation would eliminate sports in public schools. I know it will never happen but one can only wish. Can you imagine how much test scores would skyrocket? Oh, wait, most students who play in sports automatically get above average grades anyway. At least in our school they do. As soon as sports are over, grades mysteriously drop. Our so called "star" athlete is at the top of the honor roll list during football and basketball. As soon as those are over, his name doesn't even appear on the honor roll list. hmmmm...make's ya wonder
Stereotype much?

Sports is not for everyone but some kids actually do better when they are busier and their time is more structured, as well as the balance of the physical output to the mental output. I think you're assuming a lot if you think low test scores are due to sports in high school.
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Old 04-05-2011, 11:18 AM
 
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I don't blame sports for low test scores. I just think test scores will go up if more emphasis is put on academics and not on sports. People are quick to jump to defend sports but not so much to defend the educational part of school. Is one year without sports that life altering for some people? My boys are involved with sports, scouts and activities such as hunting/fishing and skiing. If my husband or I feel at anytime that these activities are interfering with academics we stop the activity so our boys can focus on academics. For those of you who say "sports is our life" have incredibly sad meaningless lives. There is nothing wrong with sports I just feel that it takes center stage in too many parents live's and in turn cause their children to believe that life is worthless without sports. As far as mandatory study halls during sports.....why only during sports? Why not mandatory study halls ALL the time? It's like schools are saying "we will help you get better grades but only if you play sports." Our school goes as far as to state during the parent sports meeting that "we will go the extra mile to ensure your child is eligible with teachers staying extra late to help with schoolwork". Seriously? The extra mile but only during sports? I am so sorry that I want my children to have an actual EDUCATION!
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Old 04-05-2011, 11:24 AM
 
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I'm also going to add that we had a parent actually get a text message from the Math teacher explaining how he felt the student deserved to play football the next weekend and that his Math grade at that moment made him ineligible but he would "bump" him a few points if he promised to work hard the following week. Not one thing was done when the parent took the text message to the school. It was swept under the rug no doubt to protect all the other teachers who do the same thing. Don't tell me that it doesn't happen because reality is that it does everyday
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