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Old 04-05-2011, 01:01 PM
 
2,258 posts, read 4,322,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeavingMassachusetts View Post
Let's see..my oldest got a partial atheltic scholarship, got his bachelors in Athletic Training, his Masters in Kiniesiology, was recruited back to his undergrad school and became one of the youngest head coaches ever. He is currently making fantastic contacts (and a fabulous name for himself) to be able to move to the next level and train Olympic and Professional Athletes. So yes, I would say that sports played an integral part of his life considering it became his career..a career that he loves and skips to work each day.
Not getting the point of this. So he wanted a career in Athletics and is doing that. Not everyone that participates in youth sports may want it as a career.

There's nothing wrong with playing sports. I thought the discussion here was the amount of time it consumes when parents have to shuttle kids around nearly every day of the week.
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cleasach View Post
There's nothing wrong with playing sports. I thought the discussion here was the amount of time it consumes when parents have to shuttle kids around nearly every day of the week.
That was the point of the thread until someone interjected that all sports were bad and did nothing but take away from academics.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--I took the one less travelled.
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:12 PM
 
1,302 posts, read 1,532,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cleasach View Post
Not getting the point of this. So he wanted a career in Athletics and is doing that. Not everyone that participates in youth sports may want it as a career.

There's nothing wrong with playing sports. I thought the discussion here was the amount of time it consumes when parents have to shuttle kids around nearly every day of the week.
He was downplaying sports and saying a kid may miss his calling..........
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Denver area
21,155 posts, read 22,162,714 times
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Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
That was the point of the thread until someone interjected that all sports were bad and did nothing but take away from academics.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--I took the one less travelled.

Someone didn't skip English even though he played football..
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:29 PM
 
2,258 posts, read 4,322,979 times
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Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Someone didn't skip English even though he played football..
Gee thanks maciesmom. I obviously missed a few posts.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:40 PM
 
4,044 posts, read 5,958,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Yeah, I know. Actually criticizing youth sports is the equivalent of spitting on the flag or forgetting to call your mom on the second Sunday in May to wish her well.
But I'm going to do it anyway.
Wanna get together for a good session of spitting on THIS flag?
Call me when you're ready!

On a serious note, and without meaning to hijack the thread...what should a family do to come out STILL looking like a normal family if the children are NOT really into any organized sport? I can't even begin to describe how much wasted time I see from where I stand when I hear all these families talk about "sports practices" left and right.
Both of my children (boy and girl) seem to have zero talent and interest in the athletics department, but given the cultural climate, I worry quite a bit about the boy. I even have nightmares about him becoming a bullying target because he is simply not into sports.

I personally loathe this culture of "youth sports" with a red, bright and glorious passion. This is, in fact, my favorite sport!
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:57 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,588,451 times
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Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
Wanna get together for a good session of spitting on THIS flag?
Call me when you're ready!

On a serious note, and without meaning to hijack the thread...what should a family do to come out STILL looking like a normal family if the children are NOT really into any organized sport? I can't even begin to describe how much wasted time I see from where I stand when I hear all these families talk about "sports practices" left and right.
Both of my children (boy and girl) seem to have zero talent and interest in the athletics department, but given the cultural climate, I worry quite a bit about the boy. I even have nightmares about him becoming a bullying target because he is simply not into sports.

I personally loathe this culture of "youth sports" with a red, bright and glorious passion. This is, in fact, my favorite sport!
I don't think you HAVE to play sports in order to be accepted or fit in. I would venture to say that it's probably a 50/50 split between kids who play sports and kids who don't at the elementary level and becomes even more lopsided in the favor of those who don't as you get into the high school years.

I do think it is worth the effort to let your children try sports if they show interest, but if there is no interest than it is what it is. I will assume that your kids are interested in other things and that you are encouraging them in exploring those interests. That's what really matters.

However, I would say that crusading against a passion that is shared by a large number of people is probably a sure way to make yourself a target of ridicule. I don't criticize people who choose to invest hours upon hours of their life practicing a musical instrument or any other such pursuit. Conversely, I don't expect them to be critical of people who choose to play sports.

In your kids case, I seriously doubt they will be the subject of much ridicule or bullying for their choice not to play sports unless of course, they adapt your attitude of "sports are pointless and such a waste of time, I have better things to do."

Different strokes for different folks, no need to get your "red, bright and glorious passion" up over something so inconsequential.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BigGuy77 View Post
Plain old genuine activity and a good philosophy consistent with lived experience can make for a full life, and those are more easily had in rural or urban areas.
BigGuy,

I loved your posts quite a lot. My simple question is: children in household who believe in just...genuine activities done together as a family, outside of organized sports...are they likely to be outcasts, mistreated, singled out, etc at school? Given how incredibly popular such "extra-curriculars" are retty much everywhere in the US, let alone suburban areas...I always fear my children will be singled out, excluded or mistreated for not participating in organized sports. They are still young but none of them shows any inclination to, or interest in organized sports.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:23 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 9,510,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
I loved your posts quite a lot. My simple question is: children in household who believe in just...genuine activities done together as a family, outside of organized sports...are they likely to be outcasts, mistreated, singled out, etc at school? Given how incredibly popular such "extra-curriculars" are retty much everywhere in the US, let alone suburban areas...I always fear my children will be singled out, excluded or mistreated for not participating in organized sports. They are still young but none of them shows any inclination to, or interest in organized sports.
Are you referring mostly to when they will be in high school? Is that when you are worried they will be "outcasts"?

My DS never did any sort of sport that was through school. And he stopped ski racing in 7th grade I think - but most kids didn't really even know he did that. Had nothing to do with school. He's a Junior now and is not particularly interested in sports. He still skis on his own for fun, but that's about it. He has many other interests but has never been considered an outcast in any way because he isn't involved in anything.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Denver area
21,155 posts, read 22,162,714 times
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Originally Posted by jkcoop View Post
Are you referring mostly to when they will be in high school? Is that when you are worried they will be "outcasts"?

My DS never did any sort of sport that was through school. And he stopped ski racing in 7th grade I think - but most kids didn't really even know he did that. Had nothing to do with school. He's a Junior now and is not particularly interested in sports. He still skis on his own for fun, but that's about it. He has many other interests but has never been considered an outcast in any way because he isn't involved in anything.
I'll have to agree here. DD was never athletic and never had any issues. DS is athletic but he doesn't limit his friends to those who are. People tend to find their niche....I really don't think bullying or cliquishness or snobbery goes along with one particular activity. There are sports snobs and there are theatre snobs and there are academic snobs. Most kids that age are just happy to find a group they feel comfortable with. I really haven't seen roaming gangs of jocks intimidating kids in the halls. That is more fodder for teen movies than real life.
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