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Old 05-28-2011, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,431 posts, read 41,534,314 times
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maciesmom- I can definitely see your point of view. I hadn't thought about it as a transition time so much as the end of schooling for so many. and I can relate to celebrating your friendships and maybe not seeing those old friends ever again. Ironically, I too was a military brat. I did manage to go to only 1 school for high school and I am still friends with some high school buddies. but I was keenly aware that most ofd those kids knew each other since grade school.

When I was in high school- back in prehistoric times- I don't remember any parties other than we ones we threw for ourselves. Also I went to school in a college town so high school was not such a big deal.

Does it seem there are more graduation parties in the past 5-10 years for high school graduation than generations ago?

I think I have a better understanding now but I still think a lot of people look at it as the end of something instead of as a time of transition.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Oh for goodness' sakes. Take it to the P&OC forum, where you'll find plenty of company to commiserate with you. We're talking achievement here, a lot of which is accomplished by parent's hard work, so keep your downer politics out of it. Sheesh.
Relax Buster Brown, it was half trivial information and half humor. I am apolitical. I don't care.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:46 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
I was thinking about the parties aspect. IME the parties are often not only a celebration and an opportunity to congratulate the graduate but also sometimes a chance for the graduates to say goodbye to some of those friends. The people they have seen every day for years, who may be heading off to a different college or different lifepath...or a chance for that special teacher or coach to stop by for more of a personal moment than is able to be had in the last frenzied days of school. I enjoy attending the graduation celebrations of my kids' friends - kids I've known or seen grow from elementary school, sometimes taking a bumpy road but reaching the goal....I am proud of them! Maybe my perspective is different (maybe not) because being raised in a military family and moving frequently throughout my childhood, I didn't have the same friends all through school to share this with. Either way, I'm all for celebrating.
I agree - I think this what all the hoopla is about - a HUGE rite of passage into the next phase of their life. Saying good-bye to friends; to childhood; I think that's why it's a big deal. NOT that it's that difficult to graduate from high school.

That said, I'm not spending a ton of money on a party! In fact, i worry that we won't even have one since we moved here in his sophomore year and he's not exactly teeming with new friends.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:46 AM
 
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I think it is a great acheivement and shouldn't be diminished at all. It is the ending of a lot of hard work from the kids (and their parents!) and should be celebrated! It's also the last time they are going to be with all their friends that they have known since they were kids, it's the end of a huge era of their lives.

I don't think it needs to be a huge party that costs thousands but it certainly should be celebrated with great pride.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
Of course it should be celebrated. It's a milestone, not only from an education standpoint but also from a cultural one. Finishing high school signals the traditional "end" of childhood and first steps into adulthood for many people. Regardless of whether people are going to college, tradeschool, military service or work, their lives will change. Why wouldn't this transition be worthy of a celebration?
This exactly.

My son has gone to school with the same kids since kindergarten. It will be very bitter sweet next year. And I definitely look at it as and end of childhood and the start of something more. It's partly celebration for not only what has ended, but what is to come.

I'm pretty sure that any party we have though will be very low key as that is just not our son to have a big deal. Probably just some family and a few close friends for a get together in our back yard.

So yes, I do think it's something to be celebrated. Just because it's something they are expected to do, does not take away from the accomplishment.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Denver area
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I've never seen graduation parties at the level of weddings but then all weddings are different too. What might be extravagant for me might be run of the mill for someone else.

A typical graduation party here (what I've both attended and hosted) is a casual "open house" with food, beverages, cake and maybe some decorations acknowledging the college or service the graduate will be moving on to. People bring gifts (typically a cash gift to help the graduate in their next step) and visit with the graduate, their family and other guests. Low key but a celebration nontheless.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,431 posts, read 41,534,314 times
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also wondering if big parties are more prevalent in the South? Maybe not as I hear Northerners blow it out too. But Southerns like to celebrate anything and everything and I am definitely a Southerner.

Also I may feel this way because I am anti big wedding blow outs too. My husband planned and made all the arrangements for our tiny little wedding but even then it was too much hoopla for me. I just wanted to go to justice of the peace and get it over with.
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
My husband planned and made all the arrangements for our tiny little wedding but even then it was too much hoopla for me. I just wanted to go to justice of the peace and get it over with.
Are you two still married?

(I should have married you.)
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Old 05-28-2011, 08:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
also wondering if big parties are more prevalent in the South? Maybe not as I hear Northerners blow it out too. But Southerns like to celebrate anything and everything and I am definitely a Southerner.
That's very possible! I can see my sister having a big blowout for graduation. Partly because she loves to entertain.....
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Old 05-28-2011, 09:01 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,827,119 times
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TK (the boy staying at our house) is graduating in a few weeks. There will be no graduation party. Why? I offered to host one for him with all of his extended family and friends as guests. But he doesn't want an innocent family celebration with cake. He wants an alcohol celebration with friends, no family. I'm NOT hosting that. No way. No how.
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