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Old 07-10-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
1,899 posts, read 4,477,204 times
Reputation: 1821

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I am just curious as I know nothing about homeschooling. I have a neighbor who once mentioned that she homeschooled other people's children. I didn't ask her if she charged for this service as I know it's none of my business. But I was left wondering, CAN a parent who is homeschooling her child take on other people's kids and homeschool them too and charge a tuition?
I am in Texas and I know different states have different regulations.
Also, for those of you who currently homeschool, how difficult is it to teach children at different grade levels at the same time? Say a 7th grader and a 3rd grader?

Thanks for all your answers!
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Old 07-10-2011, 01:50 PM
 
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In my area, homeschooling parents group together and teach each other's children. The parent who is a scientist will teach science, the mathemetician will teach match, etc. They don't charge tuition because they are a co-op: all of the parents particiate and bring some skill or talent to the table. I also know wealthy parents who homeschool via highering professionals to teach courses they can't teach adequately themselves, such as how to play the violin, higher levels of math, etc.

As for hanging out a shingle to homeschool other people's children for profit, I'd say the state would require you have the credentials to operate a school. At least, I know Pennsylvania would. At the very least, you'd need to meet state laws for daycare center.

You'd be opening yourself up to some serious lawsuits. Parents who chose to homeschool do so because they feel very strongly about their children's education. That means you would be truly under a microscope. And honestly, I doubt many homeschooling parents would pay for someone else to teach their children from a mini school in his/her basement. It goes against everything homeschooling parents believe.
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Old 07-10-2011, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
1,899 posts, read 4,477,204 times
Reputation: 1821
Thanks for your reply. Maybe that's what my neighbor meant. Oh, I wouldn't want to teach other's kids, I was just curious as how this works and now I think I misunderstood my neighbor. She was probably just doing someone a favor, since her kids go to a private school.
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Old 07-10-2011, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,459 posts, read 4,030,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CTR36 View Post
I am just curious as I know nothing about homeschooling. I have a neighbor who once mentioned that she homeschooled other people's children. I didn't ask her if she charged for this service as I know it's none of my business. But I was left wondering, CAN a parent who is homeschooling her child take on other people's kids and homeschool them too and charge a tuition?
I am in Texas and I know different states have different regulations.
Also, for those of you who currently homeschool, how difficult is it to teach children at different grade levels at the same time? Say a 7th grader and a 3rd grader?

Thanks for all your answers!
I know a number of people who teach classes at coops. Prices range from $10 to $120 for a class (per subject, that is, not per session); some folks will barter. Most are homeschooling parents themselves, but not all are.

Some state laws address whether homeschooling is defined as the parent coordingating the education, or doing all the teaching. Ours doesn't.

And with my two, it hasn't been that hard. Though they're the same age, there are some subjects where one would be ahead of the other. If I were, for example, working with ds, dd could be doing her writing, or drawing, or taking a break, or any of a number of other things. Formal "schooltime" really only takes about 10 hours over 4 days in a week. We don't need to do things like study hall, or attendance, or waiting for the others to catch up.
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Australia
1,489 posts, read 1,722,666 times
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I guess when you have 30 kids in your lounge you have created a school.
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