U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-16-2011, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Catonsville, MD
2,358 posts, read 5,332,727 times
Reputation: 1669

Advertisements

My younger daughter (late July birthday in a district with a september 1st cut-off,) while in Pre-K, seemed to me to be struggling compared to her fellow Pre-K-ers. She was adopted at 12 months and may have had delays as a result of her first year. She was already in speech through the local school (where her older sister goes) and they assured me that she was ready to start. While I had my concerns, my thought was that I would rather have her experience 2 years of kindergarten than another year of preschool, if indeed we found it necessary for her to repeat.

By early November, her teacher began hinting about maybe holding her back for another year in kindergarten. I don't know if the teacher was thinking we would disagree with that because she brought it up in such a roundabout way. Once I figured out that she was definitely saying she should probably repeat, I told her that I was in no way surprised and that was fine with me.

When it came to be time to tell my daughter that she was going to repeat, we told her that WE (meaning school and we her parents) made a mistake and started her in kindergarten a little too early. She took this in stride and said, in her usual upbeat way, OK! We requested a specific teacher, who we got, and my daughter just finished her 2nd year of kindergarten. It was SUCH a good decision. The signs of ADHD and anxiety that she was showing during her first kindergarten year were gone for the most part and she was as happy as a lark. She is a little bigger than most of her buddies, but she made friends easily and has remained friends with some of her buddies who stayed in Kindergarten only one year. She is totally ready to start 1st grade.

Some people advised me not to start her in kindergarten, but when I really thought about it, an extra year in kindergarten really was better, and would introduce her to higher levels of thinking, than another year in Pre-K. And if she had been ok, she would have gone on to 1st grade last year. We have NO regrets at all. Then again, both of her parents repeated (dad repeated kindergarten and I repeated 3rd grade.) My older daughter said she feels left out since she hasn't repeated :-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-16-2011, 04:19 PM
Status: "Autumn!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,917 posts, read 98,680,463 times
Reputation: 31331
OK, I'm going to post, again. I was hoping some more people would post before I did again, but I just can't keep my "research" to myself.

Last night, I google "redshirting" as opposed to the more scholarly terms I used the night before. I found a lot of information. I read several articles. All had different POVs (of course), but I did find some commonalities. I will post my own responses/reactions in red (for redshirting).

1. Redshirting is an upper middle class issue.

My guess is this is because lower income people cannot afford extra years of preschool and/or childcare for several kids. In addition, Head Start is set up for three and four year olds, who are then expected to go on to kindergarten when five.

2. Redshirting is a fairly new issue.

Perhaps, but I can recall my mom and her friends discussing kindergarten/1st grade cut off dates back when I was a kid in the 50s/60s. However, it is true that no one (that I knew of) redshirted kids, however, the school districts seemed to have more freedom to fail (their term) kids then, and the youngest kids were often held back at the end of first grade. I remember a story from my mom about a neighbor kid whose birthday was in September. He was sent to school when he was about to turn 6 (this district did not have kindergarten) and it just didn't work. His mom tried everything, the carrot (staying with him for a few hours), the stick (literally) and finally she gave up and waited a year.

My brother was advised to "redshirt" his daughter back in 1982, b/c she has a July birthday. Coming from the business world, not academics, DB had never heard of this. When I had my kids, in the 1980s, this was a hot topic in my mom's groups. A friend was advised in 1986 to redshirt her son with an August birthday. After much soul-searching, she did. At first, she was happy about it, but later felt it really didn't help much; he was bright and it was his social skills that were not quite all there, something that has never changed.


3. More boys than girls are redshirted.

Perhaps, again, but since I have girls and know more girls than boys, I know of quite a few girls who were redshirted.

4. A lot of redshirting is done for sports.

Indeed, I know of several redshirted boys. Interestingly, in club sports, team selection is often made by birthdate, not school grade, negating the advantage of redshirting. In Colorado, a student cannot participate in high school sports if s/he turns 19 before the beginning of the school year.

5. The upper-middle class parents of redshirted kids frequently advocate for a more academic kindergarten curriculum.

6. There is no real academic advantage, especially later in school, e.g. high school. Prior to high school, the differences become less as time goes on.

7. Older students, both redshirted and retained, have a higher high school drop-out rate.

No explanation of why, sorry, Zimbo.

8. Any cut-off date wil produce a class where there is a year's difference in age between the oldest and youngest students.

9. No matter where the cut-off date is set, some students will be younger than others.

States have moved the cut-off date up in many cases, just to see people holding a different group of kids back.

My younger daughter has a July birthday, and we considered holding her back. However, we finally decided that she would not benefit from another year of pre-school. She did fine, graduated in the top 10% of her class and is now in grad school. It is interesting to note that Indiana moved its cutoff date to June 1, then backed off and it is now August 1.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2011, 05:56 PM
 
Location: New England
1,239 posts, read 1,648,752 times
Reputation: 928
My son will be 3 in September. Our cutoff here is September 30, so he can start kindergarten early by 11 days. I'm having a tough time with this already. He is speech delayed but has tested out of EI. His last test put his comprehension skills at the level of a 4.5 year old. He can already do "the oven is hot, an ice cube is ______" fill-ins. He's also gigantic....46 lbs and 3'5"+ tall. He looks like he's 4 years old. He's already going to be the largest in his class...if I hold him back, he'll be massive and may feel awkward. But I worry about maturity. Hopefully his pre-K teacher will have good feedback for me.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2011, 06:24 PM
Status: "Autumn!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,917 posts, read 98,680,463 times
Reputation: 31331
Quote:
Originally Posted by rizzo0904 View Post
My son will be 3 in September. Our cutoff here is September 30, so he can start kindergarten early by 11 days. I'm having a tough time with this already. He is speech delayed but has tested out of EI. His last test put his comprehension skills at the level of a 4.5 year old. He can already do "the oven is hot, an ice cube is ______" fill-ins. He's also gigantic....46 lbs and 3'5"+ tall. He looks like he's 4 years old. He's already going to be the largest in his class...if I hold him back, he'll be massive and may feel awkward. But I worry about maturity. Hopefully his pre-K teacher will have good feedback for me.....
I know this sounds like a brush off, but this isn't something you have to decide now. You have a good year and a half to make this decision.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 08:06 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,638,258 times
Reputation: 22152
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmom View Post
Next year my dd will turn 5 about a month before the cutoff date for beginning Kindergarten in our school district (in other words, if she were born a month later she would not be eligible to begin until the following year). I have considered starting her in Kindergarten a year later mainly because of some minor developmental delays. She generally has been slower to develop (usually at the late range of what is considered normal), and significantly behind in a few specific areas (e.g. she did not begin to speak until age 3). She still receives therapy for these delays, but does appear to catch up and reach milestones on her own eventually. There has been no formal diagnosis other than developmental delay. My thinking is that she might be more successful and experience fewer barriers in school if she has that extra year of development under her belt.

The other reason might seem silly, but it sticks out in my mind. My younger daughter was born right after the same cutoff. So even though they are just over two years apart in age, if we went by the cutoffs provided by the school district, they would be three years apart in school, which seems odd to me.

I've known people who waited until age 6 to begin Kindergarten and say it was a good choice for their kid. Other people have told me that she will later resent me for the decision, as she will realize that she could be one year ahead in school.

I do not want to set her up to fail, or put her in a position of later having to repeat a grade (if they even still do that).

Any insights, especially from parents who have been in this situation, would be greatly appreciated. Would like to hear pros, cons, experiences, etc. Thank you!
Go with your gut. No one knows your child better than you and you can later make up some reason why it didn't work out for him to start -- if it ever comes up, you never would have to tell the child it was because you thought he was slow.

In some parts of the country, people hold back kids who are not even close to the age cut off because they want their child to come out at the top or be better athetically because being a full year older than most of the others certainly provides some very nice advantages.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 08:21 PM
 
Location: here
24,467 posts, read 28,688,010 times
Reputation: 31035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

4. A lot of redshirting is done for sports.

Indeed, I know of several redshirted boys. Interestingly, in club sports, team selection is often made by birthdate, not school grade, negating the advantage of redshirting. In Colorado, a student cannot participate in high school sports if s/he turns 19 before the beginning of the school year.


States have moved the cut-off date up in many cases, just to see people holding a different group of kids back.

My younger daughter has a July birthday, and we considered holding her back. However, we finally decided that she would not benefit from another year of pre-school. She did fine, graduated in the top 10% of her class and is now in grad school. It is interesting to note that Indiana moved its cutoff date to June 1, then backed off and it is now August 1.
re sports: my kids are young, but I think it is strange that the cut off date for sports (so far) is July 31, and the date for entering school is Oct 1. So, my just turned 8 yo is playing with kids a grade higher than he is in, (because we started him at 6 not 5) and he's the youngest on the team; but my almost 6 yo is the oldest on his team, and is playing with his classmates, even though he is starting K at age 6 too.

Anyone turning 19 before the school year starts has had more of a set back than just starting K a year late. Mine were 6 in July and Sept prior to or just after starting K and will turn 18 at the beginning of their senior years.

When we lived in CA the cut off was Dec 1! We most likely would have started both kids on time there. I think I heard CA is adjusting it's date.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2011, 12:19 AM
Status: "Autumn!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,917 posts, read 98,680,463 times
Reputation: 31331
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
re sports: my kids are young, but I think it is strange that the cut off date for sports (so far) is July 31, and the date for entering school is Oct 1. So, my just turned 8 yo is playing with kids a grade higher than he is in, (because we started him at 6 not 5) and he's the youngest on the team; but my almost 6 yo is the oldest on his team, and is playing with his classmates, even though he is starting K at age 6 too.

Anyone turning 19 before the school year starts has had more of a set back than just starting K a year late. Mine were 6 in July and Sept prior to or just after starting K and will turn 18 at the beginning of their senior years.

When we lived in CA the cut off was Dec 1! We most likely would have started both kids on time there. I think I heard CA is adjusting it's date.
Cut off dates vary by sport. In my kids' gymnastics league, the cutoff was April 1. The only reason I can think of for that is that the season started on ~ May 1. My older daughter's birthday is March 14, so the April 1 cut-off did not work to her advantage. For the younger one, with a July 4 birthday, it was probably the only time she was one of the oldest in a group.

High school sports go by grade, so an older kid is at an advantage.

Here is the exact wording from CHSAA (Colorado High School Activities Association) regarding age:

"The student may not participate in the upcoming school year if he/she reaches the 19th birthday before August 1."

So yeah, there is some leeway there.

I read some articles about California planning to change its date, but never read if they did or didn't.

http://www.chsaa.org/about/pdf/Handbook_2011.pdf (broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:38 AM.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top