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Old 07-16-2011, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Macao
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When did you kid start speaking....not just nouns here and there. But using languge with the grammar, full sentences, etc.?
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Old 07-16-2011, 10:48 PM
 
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My oldest daughter did not speak until right around the time she turned three. She went from saying a handful of unintelligible words to speaking in full sentences. It was as if a light switch turned on. My younger daughter has been on a more typical trajectory with speech and is just now beginning to use 2-3 word sentences (not sure whether that is what you consider grammar and full sentences). She is 22 months.
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Old 07-16-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmom View Post
My oldest daughter did not speak until right around the time she turned three. She went from saying a handful of unintelligible words to speaking in full sentences. It was as if a light switch turned on. My younger daughter has been on a more typical trajectory with speech and is just now beginning to use 2-3 word sentences (not sure whether that is what you consider grammar and full sentences). She is 22 months.
That goes with one theory I have that the oldest is delayed, and the ones after that pick it up quickly from the oldest one.

Glad, to hear your story. My son is 2 1/2, and it's basically a handful of unitelligeible words. I'm hoping for that light switch A good friend of mine basically had the same situation with his son as you mentioned with yours. So, maybe my son is on that track
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Old 07-16-2011, 11:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
That goes with one theory I have that the oldest is delayed, and the ones after that pick it up quickly from the oldest one.
Not necessarily true! It's not uncommon for the older children to speak for the younger children, causing the younger children to have a delay in speaking because they have no need to speak. My sister didn't speak at all until she was 4 years old. Then one day, she spoke in complete full complex sentences!

The reason she didn't speak for so long is because our oldest sister spoke for her all the time. She'd say, "Sally's hungry." "Sally is thirsty." etc. The day Sally did speak was to give our older sister a piece of her mind. It was hillarious! The funniest part is my sister who had delayed speaking NEVER SHUT UP once she started talking! Fifty years later, she still talks and talks and talks. My parents alway said she had catching up to do!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Glad, to hear your story. My son is 2 1/2, and it's basically a handful of unitelligeible words. I'm hoping for that light switch A good friend of mine basically had the same situation with his son as you mentioned with yours. So, maybe my son is on that track
Are you sure that you're not so overly attentive to your son's needs that he doesn't have a reason to speak?
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
When did you kid start speaking....not just nouns here and there. But using languge with the grammar, full sentences, etc.?
Eldest was in full sentences and dialing her own long distance calls by two (only to Grandmama, she wasn't a BellSouth prodigy or anything). Youngest didn't really talk until nearly three (and then in full sentences)-- not that she couldn't; I suspect she just thought we were literally too boring for words. Middle ones were...well, in the middle, though closer to the eldest than the youngest (albeit without phone privileges).
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Old 07-17-2011, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Eastwood, Orlando FL
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My oldet barely spoke until 3. She' 19 now and I don't think she's stopped talking since. My boys, who are younger, spoke much earlier
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Old 07-17-2011, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Mebane
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My first was speaking in sentences at around 2 years old. My second is 27 months old and does not speak well. She is enrolled in early intervention and gets speech therapy twice per week. She is considered significantly delayed. We have been signing with her, and she can communicate pretty well with signs and is attempting to use more words too.

If you have any concerns, you can have a free evaluation done by your state's early intervention office under 3 years old. Over 3 goes to the public school system for intervention.
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Old 07-17-2011, 03:48 PM
 
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There are children who are simply late talkers, but if you have concerns an evaluation is in order. My own children spoke quite early. My son was saying words at 4 months (uhhh for up when he wanted to be pulled up by his fingers). Most people did not believe he was saying anything that was a word, but he was. Both my kids were using words that others could understand by 12 months - things like mama, bye, ball, etc. My daughter spoke so well at 18 months that the nursery school teachers her brother had thought she was close to 3.

OTOH, my granddaughter spoke at 16 to 18 months and then lost language due to ear infections and fluid in her ears. Her brother is still relatively non-verbal at 7, but he was dxed with autism at 18 months (not speaking at all at that time).

A child who is not speaking at 2.5 should definitely be evaluated - it may be nothing, but speech therapy cannot hurt and kids love to play with the adults who give them therapy. Children usually have around 4 to 6 words at least by age 2. The key is that late talkers can catch up. It's when they do not catch up that parents have problems.

You can try this website if you believe your child is a natural late talker.

Natural Late Talkers

Quote:
First and foremost, a medical evaluation should be completed in all cases in which a child is delayed in talking in order to rule out any medical factors contributing to the late onset of language. In addition, an audiological examination should be performed to ensure that hearing loss is not the cause of the late talking. If a child is not using true words by 18 months of age, this would be considered a form of late talking.

A number of clinical conditions include late talking as a symptom. The fourth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV, APA 1994) lists a number of conditions "first appearing in childhood" that include late talking. The most prevalent include Expressive Language Disorder, Mixed Expressive-Receptive Language Disorder, Phonological Disorder, Mental Retardation, and some of the Pervasive Developmental Disorders including Autism, Rhett's Syndrome, and PDD-NOS (not otherwise specified). Note that Asberger's syndrome is characterized in the DSM-IV as normal onset of language, indicating that late talking is not a symptom of this condition. And of course, there is also the possibility that a child is just a late bloomer.

In the Natural Late Talkers support group, parents are encouraged to seek out an accurate diagnosis based on careful observation of the child and a detailed examination of additional risk factors. In general, the fewer risk factors evident, the more likely the late talking is a developmental variation rather than a clinical condition.
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Old 07-17-2011, 04:57 PM
 
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My youngest didn't talk a lot until he got to kindergarten. We knew it was because he couldn't get a word in edge-wise with two very chatty older brothers who never shut up. So we would tell them (I suppose some people would say we should have politely asked them) to be quiet so their brother could talk. Once he got to school and away from them the problem was solved. (Until he got home.)

But.... He's the most observant of them. They were talk, talk, talk and he was noticing things. It evened out.

In answer to the original question, by 3.

Last edited by DewDropInn; 07-17-2011 at 05:07 PM..
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:57 PM
 
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My oldest daughter was using 3-4 word sentences when she was just shy of 2.....All of my children were using 3-4 words or more by 3 years.......but I have a cousin who never really spoke at all untill he was 5(he's now a colledge math professor).
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