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Old 10-17-2011, 02:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo61397 View Post
Just because a child can do his ABCs, etc does NOT mean that it's not autism. Autism is a spectrum of disorders. And many children have splinter skills. So yes it is rude to assume that this child and his mother are not having issues.
Yep, both my grandchildren knew their ABCs early. The younger one was very nonverbal except for things like reciting ABCs and numbers. The older one had not only the names of the letters, but their sounds before she was 2. She still has asperger's syndrome.

 
Old 10-17-2011, 04:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo61397 View Post
Before my son was diagnosed with autism, I was told by family members that I had Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy. A big thing that tells me that this is NOT the case is that it would be nearly impossible to induce those symptoms with medication. Most cases of Munchausen the parents medicate the child to induce symptoms, and then take the child to the doctor for diagnosis. I think it's kind of sad that people feel the need to armchair quarterback a parent. I don't believe this parent has Munchausen.

As I stated earlier subtle symptoms will not be caught by regular pediatricians. My son has autism, he was well spoken at 2 years old (he lost many words at that time), he walked on his toes, was echolalic, and he was a severe insomniac. Of course I was blamed for nearly every single one of his symptoms, and my husband's commander's wife sought fit to announce to the entire spouse's group that I was making up the fact that my son had autism, and she knew better than I did, because she met him three times and was a special education teacher. There was nothing wrong with him. After watching these videos I can completely sympathize with this poor woman.


While I agree that it's pretty hard to induce these symptoms, why can't the boy just be a little more active/high strung/energetic ect..? Lately it seems like anytime a child is out the normal bracket, they must be austistic. My youngest was crying when he was born and breaks down in tears at the slightest worry. He gets into trouble on a daily basis. He breaks things, takes things apart and is constantly losing things. He's rough with animals. He worries about everything to the point that it consumes his life. He cannot sit still and by that I mean he literally cannot sit in a chair for more than five minutes without fidgeting. He is a pessimist to no end, has trouble making friends and when he does make a friend, worries non-stop that he will lose his friend to someone else. He had colic from the time he was three months old until he was seven months old. I actually lost hearing in one ear because he cried so much all the time. He ran away when he was two because he couldn't ride his pony the second he asked. We had to lock all of our vehicles up all the time because he would get in them and mess the wiring up. (we live in a VERY rural area and don't lock anything up). Do I think he has any underlying diseases/medical issues other than he may have anxiety? No Way! Does his Doctor who by the way has known him since the day he was born and see's him on a daily basis as his child attends the same school in the class next to my sons? Not in the least bit. He is however, a very energetic, high strung boy who tends to get into more situations than his brothers ever did. Has Autism or ADD/ADHD ever crossed my mind? Nope. He is above average in school, and aside from the fact that he gets into a little more trouble in school than his brothers ever did, a very normal little boy. I don't deny that many children have Autism but I see a trend very much like the ADD/ADHD trend of over-diagnosing.
 
Old 10-17-2011, 05:24 PM
 
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I just watched the video about going to church. It is apparent that these parents do not know how to discipline/control their son. They actually stopped going to church because of him. He is controlling their lives. She even says that he screams when they pick him up at church to keep him from running all over. This is a tactic that children (when allowed to do so) do to get their way, nothing more. This kid is controlling the family the way he wants to.
 
Old 10-17-2011, 05:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magoomafoo View Post
I just watched the video about going to church. It is apparent that these parents do not know how to discipline/control their son. They actually stopped going to church because of him. He is controlling their lives. She even says that he screams when they pick him up at church to keep him from running all over. This is a tactic that children (when allowed to do so) do to get their way, nothing more. This kid is controlling the family the way he wants to.
This is also a sign of autism. He didn't like being picked up as an infant (first video), unless it was a certain way, another sign of autism. He doesn't sleep, another sign of autism. He is hyperactive, another sign of autism. He toe walks, another sign of autism. He flaps his hands, another sign of autism. He speaks echolalically, another sign of autism.

It hurst no one to get him looked at for those symptoms. Autism is not over-diagnosed. It's actually quite difficult to get an autism diagnosis, especially when the child is high functioning. I know people who took 9 years to get the right diagnosis and the right help for their child. But people are too fearful of labels and they have this stupid stigma against parents for actually seeking a diagnosis. Autism can be overcome with behavioral therapies.
 
Old 10-17-2011, 07:49 PM
 
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It's also a sign of numerous other medical conditions and/or behavioral problems, not JUST Autism.
 
Old 10-17-2011, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Upper Midwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magoomafoo View Post
I just watched the video about going to church. It is apparent that these parents do not know how to discipline/control their son. They actually stopped going to church because of him. He is controlling their lives. She even says that he screams when they pick him up at church to keep him from running all over. This is a tactic that children (when allowed to do so) do to get their way, nothing more. This kid is controlling the family the way he wants to.
I agree with this. They are good parents, but they have a passive parenting style. I was thinking the same thing. I was thinking about how he gets up in the middle of the night too. I don't think 2 1/2 years old is too old to lay down the law when it comes to that. Telling him, "We stay in our beds at night, and that's that." Or the Supernanny technique. She has a great technique for getting kids to stay in their beds.

But she also said that he's been sleeping well since he's been diagnosed (and getting insulin). So maybe it was diabetes related? OR... he's just worn out from all the new excitement around him (the hospital, the doctors, all the shots)? Who knows.

As far as the major health assumptions, I'm not taking any part in that anymore. It's ignorant, imo, and that's all I'm going to say about it.

Oh not only did they stop going to church, they switched churches. They now go to one about 23 miles away. It's better in the sense that it has a nursery and they have friends that go there. But still... Henry did all that. Even the oldest churches now have make-shift baby areas/day cares these days though... even if it's just the basement with a few toys and a few women who volunteer to watch the kids. Their old church IS kind of behind the times in that regard.

I have to wonder if they even attempted to lay down the law when it came to church services. Any age-appropriate consequences for misbehaving.... anything. It'd be interesting to find out.
 
Old 10-17-2011, 09:01 PM
 
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I wish you could here my tone in this post. I am not trying to sound flip or smart at all. I know very little about autism. But if he does have a very light case (is that the right phrase?) of autism so what?? I know it sounds bad the way I am wording it, please forgive me. I just mean if it is so light does it even need to be treated? Could it be treated? How would it be treated? How would he act as he gets older? If it is such a light case could the treatment be too much. Would it be better to just let him be a hyper kid who likes to walk on his toes? Would he get worse as he gets older?
 
Old 10-18-2011, 09:36 AM
 
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It's just that 20 years ago, if your child had behavioral problems, ADD/ADHD was the diagnosis. Now diagnosis's of Autism are skyrocketing. Am I the only one who see's a trend? I also notice even in our little town the number of new parents who seem VERY passive to say the least. Too many parents want to be their children's friend and not the parent.
 
Old 10-18-2011, 07:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzyQ123 View Post
I wish you could here my tone in this post. I am not trying to sound flip or smart at all. I know very little about autism. But if he does have a very light case (is that the right phrase?) of autism so what?? I know it sounds bad the way I am wording it, please forgive me. I just mean if it is so light does it even need to be treated? Could it be treated? How would it be treated? How would he act as he gets older? If it is such a light case could the treatment be too much. Would it be better to just let him be a hyper kid who likes to walk on his toes? Would he get worse as he gets older?
Light cases... don't go away or get grown out of. Being hyper becomes more of a problem as a child gets older and goes to school. Attention span can also be a problem as he gets older. Autism often becomes *more* apparent as a child gets older. Also, children with any special need are more likely to be bullied than other kids. This is especially so for children with social deficits and that is the major autistic deficit.

Walking on toes (if done frequently) can cause problems with shortened hamstrings (just as wearing heels all the time does). Walking on the toes or the ball of the foot is fairly common in children who are just beginning to walk. Most children outgrow toe walking by age 2.

Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

Quote:
Persistent toe walking in otherwise healthy children occasionally requires treatment, such as casting the foot and ankle for about 6 weeks to help stretch the calf muscles.
Every child with autism will have different symptoms and can get better or worse as they age. With treatment, things become better because the child is getting the help he needs to learn how to cope with the environment.

Try watching Parenthood for a good view of an older child with aspergers syndrome. There is more than one story line going on in this show, but one story line involves Max who has aspergers syndrome. The portrayal is pretty good. Of course, if you haven't watched before you will miss the back story of when he was diagnosed and what his parents were feeling, etc.

http://www.nbc.com/parenthood/video/...aby.../1356651

http://www.nbc.com/parenthood/video/nora/1361576

Last edited by nana053; 10-18-2011 at 07:19 PM.. Reason: Putting in a link
 
Old 10-18-2011, 08:41 PM
 
781 posts, read 828,333 times
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Thanks nana053 for the reply. This is something I think I have purposefully tried not to give much thought too. Some days I think my 3 yr old dd is a "little off" in some slight way. Then other days I don't see it so much. I am still trying to figure out if she is just a personality thing or if something more is going on. Sometime I just ignore it or maybe I have just gotten used to it.

Would a doctor think I was crazy if I tell them that sometimes she cries a lot for really no reason (don't most 3 yr olds do that) and that she will go from crying and taking a fit to perfectly happy and laughing in 5 seconds. She will get stuck on a thought sometime and can't think or talk about anything else for 30 minutes at a time kind of repeating the same things(again is that just a 3 yr old thing?) She holds her ears when we flush the potty because its so loud. Her speech is a little behind too?
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