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Old 12-11-2018, 08:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 191 times
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With my 10 yr old and my 8 year old girls its 1 warning then if it is still backchat or deliberate disobedience its a spanning on the bare with either hand or wooden spoon. My 4 year old time out still works
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:19 AM
 
11,571 posts, read 9,434,603 times
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I was in a dopey mood the first time it happened. My eldest gave me the large scale (not ignorable) eye roll and a giant sigh and moan when I asked him to do something. I gave him this look like wtf? A few minutes later, he asked what time dinner was. I eye rolled, sighed, moaned and said "I don't want to"! Next time he pulled an eye roll, I just asked "Do you still like eating"?
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Old 12-12-2018, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,252 posts, read 60,576,337 times
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Laugh at it and be happy that you are raising a normal child. we mostly just made fun of it.

If it gets rude, then you cannot tolerate it or they will begin to think rudeness is ok.
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:41 PM
 
Location: San Diego
1,129 posts, read 372,761 times
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Grew up in the 70's with my 2 sisters and brother plus a stressed out single mom. She told later on in life that she had to take control of us and set the tone or they might as well have carried her off to the cuckoo house. We certainly got our share of belt whippings but during our teenage years she started to take away things that we loved - for me it was tv. One time I smarted off to her and she turned around and said "well, you can kiss your love affair with The Bionic Woman goodbye tonight." NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! :c rying: Well played mother.

Also, her yes meant yes and her no meant no. She never veered from that and I think that was the key to keeping all of us in line because we knew that we couldn't "work her" so to speak. One of her favorite lines "dont play me for the fool." She was tough but her life lessons have served me well in my adult life.
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:49 PM
 
7,616 posts, read 2,988,376 times
Reputation: 20170
The ability to fake respect is an excellent skill, and will make your life much smoother than if you don't learn it.

But I don't think a child's relationship with a parent should involve always faking respect.

If a child rolls their eyes at a parent, that's when you say I know this is hard, and this is a disappointment to you.

Stuff like that. You don't immediately tell them they can't communicate frustration to you.
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Old 12-17-2018, 04:38 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 1,345,475 times
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"Let's try that again. And remember, I am not ________'s___ mom."
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Old 12-17-2018, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Wherever life takes me.
6,112 posts, read 6,493,314 times
Reputation: 3088
My mom ignored it for the most part.
It didn’t matter how I felt about something I still had to do it.
So to her I could huff and puff all I wanted I was still doing whatever it was.

Oftentimes I’d be doing dishes, my headphones in, my ears nearly bleeding the volume so loud, a scowl across my face, tears in my eyes.

She didn’t care, the dishes were being done.
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:18 AM
 
800 posts, read 282,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
My older child (8) has been getting very mouthy with me lately. He rolls his eyes, makes smart remarks, back talks and groans when I tell him to do something. How would you handle this?

Of course, he is a perfect angel at school!
Pop him in the mouth
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Texas
42,563 posts, read 50,636,843 times
Reputation: 68006
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
A couple times when my oldest has said something mouthy, I froze, gave her a long look, and then said, "I think I just hallucinated because you did NOT just say that to me." I am pretty easygoing but they all know not to wake the dragon.
Lol. This is me.
Jovial and goofy and easy going. I never yell.
But "the look" scares the pants off everyone.
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
2,188 posts, read 822,949 times
Reputation: 4558
Rap across the mouth was my method and it needed to be employed very few times, I can probably count on two hands the amount of times for all 4 of mine combined.
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