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Old 03-23-2012, 03:06 AM
 
11,036 posts, read 9,557,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimme it View Post
I've heard Brittany and Tiffany referred to as, "Walmart names". And then there are people who think names like, Adelaide and agatha are elegant. I think it often depends on which part of the country you live in. In my area lots of girls have old fashioned names. Not an Ashley or Madison for miles And there are parts of the country that would be turned off by, "Charlotte, Elizabeth and Hazel".
I agree! I said that I favored names that were not stripperesque or stodgy.

Naming a child a name to show the world that you don't shop at Walmart, attend a church in a building that resembles an airplane hanger, or have a 35 year old grandmother seems pretentious.

I don't like lumpy frumpy names. I think that there are so many perfectly lovely names that are distinctive, not over used, and "lifespan flexible."

I'm originally from NYC, and later, the North Shore of Long Island, BTW; and I do not know of any "Tiffanys" or "Brittanys here in my part of PA. My children's friends were born in the 1990s
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:17 AM
 
2,019 posts, read 2,628,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
She is from Ireland originally. I think she knows how to pronounce her daughter's name. They go back to see her mom and dad every summer.
No need to get so defensive. People one town over might pronounce the name a different way. I have heard my own name pronounced a bunch of different ways in Ireland. It is all about where you are in the country.
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Old 03-23-2012, 10:15 AM
 
21,973 posts, read 12,770,324 times
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Pronunciation of ANY name is heavily dependent on the speaker's regional dialect. There is no "correct" way to pronounce a name. (Or a word.)

English speaking native residents of Hamilton, New Zealand, San Francisco, CA, and East London, UK will pronounce the name Benjamin three very different ways. That's the beauty of language.
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Old 03-23-2012, 10:54 AM
Status: "Happy Thanksgiving Week!" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,707 posts, read 59,955,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UnexpectedError View Post
The problem with the ranking system is that it's done by the frequency of the name, not really the popularity. If every boy this year were given a different, entirely unique name except two who were both named Michael, that becomes the number 1 most popular name even though it would be quite uncommon. These lists are much more relevant during decades when people used the same few names over and over and every Tom, Dick, and Harry really was named Tom, Dick, and Harry.
Yes and no. If out of 100 boys, 30 are named Michael and one each are named Ezekiel, Ichabod, and Herkimer, Michael is the more popular name than those.
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:54 PM
 
27,713 posts, read 21,742,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Pronunciation of ANY name is heavily dependent on the speaker's regional dialect. There is no "correct" way to pronounce a name. (Or a word.)

English speaking native residents of Hamilton, New Zealand, San Francisco, CA, and East London, UK will pronounce the name Benjamin three very different ways. That's the beauty of language.
You mean like cawfee?
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
You mean like cawfee?
Not to mention: flowiz and numbuh.
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Old 03-23-2012, 01:04 PM
 
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Yep!

(And the fact that I say, "yep" tells something about me, lol.)
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Old 03-23-2012, 01:06 PM
 
Location: IL
12,150 posts, read 6,011,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Pronunciation of ANY name is heavily dependent on the speaker's regional dialect. There is no "correct" way to pronounce a name. (Or a word.)

English speaking native residents of Hamilton, New Zealand, San Francisco, CA, and East London, UK will pronounce the name Benjamin three very different ways. That's the beauty of language.
Exactly. My name was fairly common for my generation, but I have had to change the way I pronounce it in the US. My family pronounces it one way, and everyone else another way.
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Old 03-23-2012, 01:17 PM
 
3,518 posts, read 2,906,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes and no. If out of 100 boys, 30 are named Michael and one each are named Ezekiel, Ichabod, and Herkimer, Michael is the more popular name than those.
Yes, but what I was saying is that there are more names in the pot these days so it's more relevant to consider the percentage of babies named Michael and how that percentage has changed over the years than to consider the ranking alone.

Michael could be ranked #1 for the past 50 years but in the 1950s, people were more eager to give their kids traditional, standard American names so 15% of boys might have been named Michael. But today, maybe only 2% of boys are named Michael but because there is more diversity in the names parents are choosing, it could still be #1 even if far fewer Michaels are walking around.

I was reading my pregnant sister's baby book, The Baby Name Wizard, and it tracks name popularity over time by how many babies are getting that name, not by the SSA ranking.
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Old 03-23-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
12,284 posts, read 11,857,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
You mean like cawfee?
sorta like vinegar & earl
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