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Old 12-19-2011, 12:46 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 34,966,446 times
Reputation: 42369

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My sister and I were involved with ballet for many years, and this morning my sister sent me a hilarious set of videos on YouTube, featuring a few adults performing a parody of dance. One of the related videos caught my eye.


Next Generation Dancers - Mini Floor Rockers - YouTube

The girl in the foreground is in several similar videos, and I watched a few of them. I think my face looked kind of like this.



We were recently talking about whether we censor our children's music. I said that I do not (for the most part), and I pointed out how I listened to Cyndi Lauper and Madonna and managed to stay off the pole. However, those videos still make my face do that. One of them shows the little girls dancing to Lady Gaga's "Kaboom." Here are some of the lyrics:

You wanna get that?
You wanna get that?
You wanna get that?
Then I need the money.
He talking to me, like I'm a groupie
He's like a pirate, he wanna touch my booty
We all up in this club, I'm tryna leave so, so what's up
No drink left in my cup, better wake your soldier up.
Don't want love just give me your bling bling,
Listen to me boy cause I need your thing thing,
Hey there boy, not tryna be funny
Ima big girl and I need milk money.


Back when I was in dance, I remember that three of our best dancers performed a routine to Prince's "Get Off." There was a big uproar. Those girls were 14 or so, too ... this girl is eight.


Next Generation Dancers - Sierra Neudeck - TJ & the Lil Mama's - YouTube

A thread that was active today involved a young toddler and his mom, who apparently posts video blogs, or vlogs, to YouTube. The thread was closed, but there was a pretty good discussion about privacy and parental expectations. We have had similar discussions about the Duggars, pictures of children with "leashes" or strollers on humor websites, etc.

The comments on this girl's videos are almost universally positive: the dancers are praised as "amazing," "talented," and "gorgeous"; the main girl is a "star" and "going to be famous someday,"; and everyone is "jealous." One negative comment is that the costumes are "showy," but that's about the extent of it. I can't readily find a comment of disapproval--however, when I posted the video on my sister's Facebook, her response was dismay and distaste. Other people commented, and they were all negative. I imagine that the comments here will mostly be negative as well.

Bringing it back to Minnesconsinite's thread about the vlogs, what if this little girl's parent saw this thread, or the Facebook conversation I'm having about her? Do you think it would be a case of "How dare a bunch of strangers talk about my daughter??!1" or would it be more like, "Any press is good press"? Paris Hilton, Kim Kardashian, and similar socialites are famous for being famous, and they are willing to maintain their celebrity status at any cost (e.g., sex tapes, contrived scandals). Does the little girl in all these videos have a right to expect only positive comments? Do you think she even knows?
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Old 12-19-2011, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Wherever life takes me.
5,944 posts, read 6,378,467 times
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I think they know its posted, I couldn't putting something with my child in it on youtube and not telling her/him about doing so. I bet they see the comments, I bet they know some people probably don't agree with how showy they are.

And she by now, probably knows that she's not always going to get a good comment and some people will disagree.

I have to say if I had even 1/4 of that skill I would be happy. I can't dance to save my life and if I could do anything it would be stuff like that.

Regardless of if they are too young to dance like that, they sure as hell do it well and will probably grow up and get into dancing and make a career of it and make more money than I ever will.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:04 PM
 
Location: North America
14,212 posts, read 9,611,695 times
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Believe it or not i think this is somewhat more generational. I think it's a tad much for a girl that young to be dancing like that but i have come accros a lot of girls my age who find it cute and nothing wrong it it. That being said i'd sure her parents expect some level of criticism over it.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:04 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,490,118 times
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I think when you make the conscious choice to put your life out there for others to view that it also comes with a certain expectation of criticism. In that way putting your life out there for public consumption isn't all that different from posting your thoughts/opinions on CD. Someone is bound to disagree with you and level criticism in your direction.

In many of these cases the parents (and sometimes even the kids) are doing it in the hopes of garnering attention and in that realm you deserve whatever the world chooses to give you and you have no right to an expectation of it being universally positive. Even in social media there is a way to make those kinds of things private so that only certain people can see them. For example my cousin posts videos of his kids on his YouTube channel as his parents live on the other side of the country. These are private videos that you need a password to see, so it's not as if it is impossible to use those services without a reasonable amount of privacy.

So, overall it is ultimately up to the parents in terms of posting videos or exposing their kids. However, they should not go into it with an expectation of only positive comments or a level of privacy. When you put your life out there for public consumption you invite a lot of things in and not all are going to be positive. I think a lot of people out there would benefit from taking a minute to stop and think before exposing their children like that.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
12,976 posts, read 11,788,166 times
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Great topic. First off, interesting double-standard with the outfits. The girls have ridiculously skimpy, provocative outfits, and the boys are all covered up.

I think there are 2 major issues at play here. Firstly, some parents have their children engage in activities that would engender a mixed response from the public at large. This dancing being a good example. When these videos are displayed beyond the small family or social circle of the child, the responses are going to be a mixed bag. Some parents don't seem to anticipate this.

Secondly, once information/video/photographs are posted on a public domain, such as Youtube, I don't think one can have any expectations regarding the tone of the responses.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,434 posts, read 41,608,566 times
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I think the costumes were too skimpy and the dance moves too provocative and it all may come back to bite them in the butt some day. I would not allow my 8 year old to perform such a routine. Reminds me of Toddlers and Tiaras. a pedophile's dream comes true.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:29 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,490,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
First off, interesting double-standard with the outfits. The girls have ridiculously skimpy, provocative outfits, and the boys are all covered up.
I have no direct evidence of a trend in this regard, but have heard passing mentions of it in conversation and in the media. There seems to be a growing trend of protecting the sexual exploitation of boys (perhaps owing to the high profile cases regarding this recently) while simultaneously turning a blind eye to it among girls.

It's almost as if the attitude has become that boys should be a little more modest as to not draw the attention of male predators, while girls being in suggestive clothing is almost seen as a natural thing.

I remember being on the boardwalk this past summer and inline for ice cream and watching a mother force her ~11 year old son to put a shirt on as "perverts might look at you", meanwhile her younger daughter was wearing a bikini top and shorts.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:31 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,319,241 times
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I'm an old fuddy-duddyette who can't understand why parents don't protect their children. The scenario I see is the 8-year old, who is just building self-esteem, going to school and the other kids are saying, "Nah, nah, nah, nah. I saw your first poop on the internet!!" Followed by the closely-related, "And my mommie posted that you looked stupid so now the whole world knows how stupid you are."

Unless we're circling the drain so fast that someday it's expected that you put your child's first poop on the internet.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:44 PM
 
11,229 posts, read 9,225,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
Bringing it back to Minnesconsinite's thread about the vlogs, what if this little girl's parent saw this thread, or the Facebook conversation I'm having about her? Do you think it would be a case of "How dare a bunch of strangers talk about my daughter??!1" or would it be more like, "Any press is good press"?
I don't know about any press is good press.

Both things are going to happen. Some parents are going whine how dare you. People are people. People are going to comment as well, even unkindly.

My issue is one of safety. When you put your child out there on the internet, you are exposing them to ridicule that they will have to deal with as well as exposing them to real danger from internet predators. Scary stuff. My 11 yo wants a Facebook page. I said No Way. You can play mind craft or whatever on cousin's private server... but no WAY is he ready to understand the dangers of putting oneself out there.

(That one would allow your 8yo to be performing in such a hyper-sexualized dance outfit leads me to suspect one's judgement is out to lunch from the get go.)
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: California
29,580 posts, read 31,900,225 times
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People post this stuff knowing and not caring about any controversy since the point is to get their name out there and be "discovered". That's how people become famous these days. Parents have been pimping out their kids in all kinds of ways since the beginning of time. This is just the newest way.
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