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Old 12-20-2011, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,019 posts, read 98,876,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADVentive View Post
Exclusive breastfeeding usually refers to no food or drinks besides breastmilk, which I'm thinking is not what you mean here.
According to one of the articles I cited, it means no more than 5-10% of nourishment from sources outside of breast milk.
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Old 12-20-2011, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,957,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
According to one of the articles I cited, it means no more than 5-10% of nourishment from sources outside of breast milk.
I did notice that in your article, but I've never seen that before. WHO defines exclusive breastfeeding as no food or drink besides breast milk, including water, with an exception for vitamins and medication.

From WHO: WHO | The World Health Organization's infant feeding recommendation
"Exclusive breastfeeding" is defined as no other food or drink, not even water, except breast milk (including milk expressed or from a wet nurse) for 6 months of life, but allows the infant to receive ORS, drops and syrups (vitamins, minerals and medicines).

"Predominant breastfeeding" means that the infant's predominant source of nourishment has been breast milk (including milk expressed or from a wet nurse as the predominant source of nourishment). However, the infant may also have received liquids (water and water-based drinks, fruit juice) ritual fluids and ORS, drops or syrups (vitamins, minerals and medicines).


Also, CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/dat...data/index.htm
Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as ONLY breast milk NO solids, no water, and no other liquids.

For the purposes of LAM, some sources go so far as to define exclusive breastfeeding as to mean no pumped milk, no bottles, and even no pacifiers.
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Old 12-20-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,019 posts, read 98,876,691 times
Reputation: 31456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADVentive View Post
I did notice that in your article, but I've never seen that before. WHO defines exclusive breastfeeding as no food or drink besides breast milk, including water, with an exception for vitamins and medication.

From WHO: WHO | The World Health Organization's infant feeding recommendation
"Exclusive breastfeeding" is defined as no other food or drink, not even water, except breast milk (including milk expressed or from a wet nurse) for 6 months of life, but allows the infant to receive ORS, drops and syrups (vitamins, minerals and medicines).

"Predominant breastfeeding" means that the infant's predominant source of nourishment has been breast milk (including milk expressed or from a wet nurse as the predominant source of nourishment). However, the infant may also have received liquids (water and water-based drinks, fruit juice) ritual fluids and ORS, drops or syrups (vitamins, minerals and medicines).


Also, CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/dat...data/index.htm
Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as ONLY breast milk NO solids, no water, and no other liquids.

For the purposes of LAM, some sources go so far as to define exclusive breastfeeding as to mean no pumped milk, no bottles, and even no pacifiers.
Well, apparently that was the definition in the study the article reported out. It does say that pumping is less vigorous than suckling and may reduce the maternal neuroendocrine response, and thus not be as preventive of ovulation.

10% other foods would mean a bottle of formula every tenth feeding, not even once a day in an older infant. 5% would mean a bottle every 20th feeding, maybe 1-2 X/week or so. This defintion would also allow for a little cereal (maybe once a day).
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Old 12-20-2011, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Central, NJ
2,313 posts, read 4,819,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I breastfed my son exclusively until he was 2 years old. He went straight from breast to sippy cup with no bottle at all.

I started my periods about a month after he was born and probably could have gotten pregnant again except I took clomid to get him. I had regular periods the entire time I nursed. I could tell he was not happy with the taste of the milk when I was in my period but he kept on nursing as he had no alternative.
Same here, except it started the 3rd month. And he wasn't going 4 hours between feedings even overnight.
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Old 12-20-2011, 04:25 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 13,985,408 times
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for the OP, do 1/2 breast milk half formula then gradually add more formula. I was worried my child would not like formula, she could have cared less and drank formula as easily and happily as breast milk. when to stop BF is individual, do it when you want to.
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Old 12-20-2011, 06:17 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,662,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
Ah, I see. Well, I can understand that sentiment. A lot of people are grossed out by bodily functions. Most people do not talk about pooping, sweating, coughing up phlegm, etc. Breastfeeding is not really any different. Your body's glands are making a liquid that secretes from your nipples, and another person swallows it. It's no different from, say, licking the sweat off somebody, or drinking their saliva. You find breastfeeding to be inoffensive, but that's simply your perspective. Finding one normal, natural function gross or requiring privacy and modesty (pooping, for instance) and another to be okay to do in front of others (breastfeeding) is merely arbitrary.
I sort of agree, when you put it that way. However, poop, sweat, and phlegm aren't intended to nourish another human being. When you add that into the mix, it changes things a bit. I personally don't find breastfeeding offensive. I just get uncomfortable seeing it, because I was never exposed to seeing womens' breasts growing up, except in the occasional Playboy magazine. So by the time I was already grown, the link between breast and sex had already been firmly implanted. I think that's pretty common in this culture, since exposed breasts are still not allowed on prime time network TV and regardless of the laws, you don't see women walking around topless in this country's cities, or in most towns, in any shopping mall, etc. etc.

The idea that exposed breast = taboo is pretty common. And so, it shouldn't be surprising to anyone that the idea of breastfeeding, even talking -about- it- might make some people uncomfortable.

I don't find it gross though, not at all.
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Old 12-20-2011, 06:23 PM
 
11,230 posts, read 9,239,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I sort of agree, when you put it that way. However, poop, sweat, and phlegm aren't intended to nourish another human being. When you add that into the mix, it changes things a bit. I personally don't find breastfeeding offensive. I just get uncomfortable seeing it, because I was never exposed to seeing womens' breasts growing up, except in the occasional Playboy magazine. So by the time I was already grown, the link between breast and sex had already been firmly implanted. I think that's pretty common in this culture, since exposed breasts are still not allowed on prime time network TV and regardless of the laws, you don't see women walking around topless in this country's cities, or in most towns, in any shopping mall, etc. etc.

The idea that exposed breast = taboo is pretty common. And so, it shouldn't be surprising to anyone that the idea of breastfeeding, even talking -about- it- might make some people uncomfortable.

I don't find it gross though, not at all.
The thing about this kind of conversation is the assumption that a grown mind can't CHANGE. You were not exposed growing up. I was not exposed to gay couples being openly affectionate growing up. Yet when I see it now, it is not uncomfortable. When the mind is open, it can change.

I think this is happening slowly but surely, never as quickly as we rabid activists would like. But in my mother's day, in rural New England, she would NEVER have nursed in public. She mostly kept the fact that she nursed at all to herself. So we have come a long way.
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Old 12-20-2011, 06:25 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,662,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trackwatch View Post
Why not? You don't gag with the thought of drinking Cow's milk do ya?
I would gag if I had to try drinking the cow's milk right from the cow's udder. MY milk, though, comes to me in the supermarket, in a white carton with red markings that declare it to be homogenized and pasteurized.

Perhaps if women were to express their milk in a factory where it would then be homogenized and pasteurized and put in nice neat containers with pink markings, a lot of people who currently feel uncomfortable about the idea of drinking breatsmilk, wouldn't even give the idea a second thought.

But, they don't. And so they do.
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Old 12-20-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: TX
6,009 posts, read 4,948,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I never said I see them as the same thing. I said that I understand the mindset. I am amused how bodily secretions like sweat and saliva are frequently seen as icky and gross, while another (breastmilk is the secretion of the mammary gland--no different) is viewed as this beautiful, sacred thing. There is nothing more special or wonderful about breastmilk than there is about sweat. They're both juices our bodies make. I do not think breastmilk is gross, but I also don't think sweat, urine, poo, or other bodily secretions and excretions are gross. It's because I recognize them for what they are.
I agree 100%. Breastfeeding, while not inherently "gross", is not a beautiful thing by a long shot. It serves a purpose, just as the other bodily functions you mentioned (which I do not place on a separate, lower pedestal than breastfeeding because they are ALL essential to our survival). But it isn't beautiful, and it should be well expected and accepted that some people consider breastfeeding in public rude, inconsiderate, and THEREFORE "gross".

Some things are just not for the public eye.
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Old 12-20-2011, 06:30 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,356,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I would gag if I had to try drinking the cow's milk right from the cow's udder. MY milk, though, comes to me in the supermarket, in a white carton with red markings that declare it to be homogenized and pasteurized.
MY milk comes to me - fresh and unpasteurized - twice a day from my goat, Zilli.

However, I wouldn't necessarily want to drink it straight from her udder; it's much better if it's brought into the house, strained into a sterilized jar, and chilled in the refrigerator before drinking.

No white carton with red markings for me. Yum!
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