U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-20-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Sudcaroland
10,664 posts, read 7,732,627 times
Reputation: 31964

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorthy View Post
If people think breastmilk is nasty, they should probably rethink their dairy consumption.
I agree with you! After all, we drink milk which originally is for babies of another species, and only for them... while breastmilk is made for human babies!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-20-2011, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,974,208 times
Reputation: 2620
1) I've been breastfeeding for 5+ years straight while working full-time. I have pump weaned twice (2 kids). For pump weaning, the best way is to first decrease the amount of time per pumping. So if you normally pump for 20 minutes, start pumping for only 10 minutes. Then skip or delay pump sessions to decrease the number of times per day you are pumping. Once you are down to 1x per day, you might skip some days but not others - you might pump MWF for example. Then you can drop it all together. If you are feeling too engorged, you can just pump a short while just to relieve the pressure. You might keep the pump around at work for a few weeks just in case you are feeling engorged. I think it will take about 3-4 weeks to completely pump wean this way, but it will be much more comfortable for you than quitting cold turkey. If you stop too suddenly, you also risk mastitis. It is also completely possible to stop pumping at work but continue nursing at home. I've been doing it with this one for a year now.

2) Breasts sag due to pregnancy, not breastfeeding. It's just that when you are breastfeeding, you delay the change until you are done, wheras if you do not breastfeed, the change happens after the birth. Aesthet Surg J. 2008 Sep-Oct;28(5):534-7.

3) Breast cancer risk is reduced by 4.3% for each year of breastfeeding, plus 7% for each birth. The Lancet 2002; 360:187-195 This effect is even greater for women with BRCA1 mutations. For these women, 1 year or more of breastfeeding reduced risk by 45%. National Cancer Institute 2004 96(14):1094-1098 Of course, reduced risk does not mean zero risk. There are no guarantees.

4) Pregnancy while breastfeeding is certainly possible. When very specific rules are followed, breastfeeding is effective as birth control for the first 6 months, but most people don't/can't follow all the rules and it only lasts 6 months anyway. I got pregnant while nursing my 2 year old and went on to tandem nurse.

5) Breastmilk is not "sterile". Breastmilk contains live cells from the mother, and can also contain other microorganisms such as bacteria. Not that it matters to the point at hand, but just sayin', "sterile" is not the word for it.

6) Are we really talking about breastfeeding in public now? How does a thread about pump weaning turn into that?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 11:56 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,116,354 times
Reputation: 42377
To everyone in the thread, I apologize if you felt my posts were over the top. I meant them in good humor and did not mean to truly hurt anyone. I can be too outspoken at times.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADVentive View Post
6) Are we really talking about breastfeeding in public now? How does a thread about pump weaning turn into that?
I am sorry, that was my fault. Ordinarily I'd be watching for threaddrift and saying something if it was causing a problem, so I might not be completely objective right now. Plus infracting myself might cause a rift in the universe and is rumored to create the elusive Higgs boson.

Okay, I'll be quiet now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,096 posts, read 99,227,733 times
Reputation: 31574
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFWgal View Post
Yep, my professor even said that breastfeeding was considering as birth control in certain cultures. Go figure.

Thanks for your stories. DH and I were thinking of having two kids really close together, and after my instructor said it was hard while breastfeeding I was worried, but I guess it's possible.

Now, I'm a cup D, and I've heard so many horror stories about saggy boobs, etc. that I may consider a lift. Don't want to be kicking the boobies after having kids LOL (Have any of you considered/done it?)
Here's the skinny on breast feeding and pregnancy:

Medscape: Medscape Access
Women who are amenorrheic and exclusively breastfeed at regular intervals have the same protection against pregnancy for the first 6 months postpartum as women taking combined oral contraceptives (98% efficacy).[7] Effective use of this method depends on several important points: 1) regular intervals are defined as no intervals greater than 4 hours between feedings during the day or 6 hours at night; and 2) exclusive breastfeeding means that supplemental food should not exceed 5% to 10% of total feedings. Supplemental feeding increases the risk of ovulation and pregnancy, even in women who are not menstruating.[7,8] Expressing milk by hand or by pump is less vigorous than suckling and may reduce the maternal neuroendocrine response and increase the risk of ovulation and fertility.[After 6 months, or with the resumption of menstruation, the chance of ovulation and risk of pregnancy increase (although with exclusive breastfeeding the contraceptive efficacy of lactation at 1 year is still high [94% efficacy]).

Breast-feeding and postpartum ovulation. [IPPF Med Bull. 1982] - PubMed - NCBI

Anecdotally, I have this:

*My maternal grandmother got pregnant breast feeding my mother, who was 9 months old at the time.
*My mother got pregnant breast feeding me when I was 4 months old.
* I got pregnant while breast feeding my daughter, who was 15 months old at the time.

Because I had infertility problems and took 2 1/2 years to get pregnant, we were not using birth control. After DD #2 was born, DH got a vasectomy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
0,0
Im sure Im going to regret asking, but isnt there a shot they can give you after the baby is born that stops you from leaking/making milk? I read somewhere its used on mothers who give away babies immediately after birth for adoption.
I don't believe it is used any more. Do you know, Zimbo?

Re: the relationship between breast feeding and breast cancer, here is a scientific article. Breast feeding lowers your risk; it does not eliminate it. Keep doing those breast exams, and, when you're old enough, those mammograms.

Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk - National Cancer Institute
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 01:43 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,392,655 times
Reputation: 6452
Hmmmm......interesting information, Katiana.

In my case, boy #3 was about 6 1/2 months old when I got pregnant. As far as the nursing intervals, my kids were always nursed "on demand," which probably only rarely exceeded those four hours, including at night.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,096 posts, read 99,227,733 times
Reputation: 31574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
Hmmmm......interesting information, Katiana.

In my case, boy #3 was about 6 1/2 months old when I got pregnant. As far as the nursing intervals, my kids were always nursed "on demand," which probably only rarely exceeded those four hours, including at night.
There's always someone who didn't read the research, lol! My breast feeding pregnancy was the only pregnancy I had that didn't require Clomid. Go figure!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,849,811 times
Reputation: 47049
I breastfed my son exclusively until he was 2 years old. He went straight from breast to sippy cup with no bottle at all.

I started my periods about a month after he was born and probably could have gotten pregnant again except I took clomid to get him. I had regular periods the entire time I nursed. I could tell he was not happy with the taste of the milk when I was in my period but he kept on nursing as he had no alternative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
12,976 posts, read 11,844,159 times
Reputation: 14681
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't believe it is used any more. Do you know, Zimbo?
You are correct Kat, medications are no longer recommended to suppress lactation, even in cases of infant death, adoption, or HIV.

Parlodel and Bromocriptine used to be the drugs of choice, but both posed significant health risks (blood clots, heart attacks, strokes).

Dostinex (Cabergoline) is used in some parts of the world to suppress lactation, and sadly has made it's way into the US on the black market, and is also prescribed by less than scrupulous physicians. The primary seekers are those who want to retain perky boobs, not understanding that the de-perking takes place primarily during pregnancy, and not due to lactation. This drug also poses signifant health risks (permanently damages heart valves).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,096 posts, read 99,227,733 times
Reputation: 31574
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I breastfed my son exclusively until he was 2 years old. He went straight from breast to sippy cup with no bottle at all.

I started my periods about a month after he was born and probably could have gotten pregnant again except I took clomid to get him. I had regular periods the entire time I nursed. I could tell he was not happy with the taste of the milk when I was in my period but he kept on nursing as he had no alternative.
Well, I took Clomid to get pg too, and I still got pregnant breast feeding when the DD was 15 mos old. It was the only pregnancy that I did not have to take Clomid for. Sadly, I miscarried at ~8 wks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
You are correct Kat, medications are no longer recommended to suppress lactation, even in cases of infant death, adoption, or HIV.

Parlodel and Bromocriptine used to be the drugs of choice, but both posed significant health risks (blood clots, heart attacks, strokes).

Dostinex (Cabergoline) is used in some parts of the world to suppress lactation, and sadly has made it's way into the US on the black market, and is also prescribed by less than scrupulous physicians. The primary seekers are those who want to retain perky boobs, not understanding that the de-perking takes place primarily during pregnancy, and not due to lactation. This drug also poses signifant health risks (permanently damages heart valves).
Great info, Zimbo!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2011, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,974,208 times
Reputation: 2620
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I breastfed my son exclusively until he was 2 years old. He went straight from breast to sippy cup with no bottle at all.
Exclusive breastfeeding usually refers to no food or drinks besides breastmilk, which I'm thinking is not what you mean here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top