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Old 12-30-2011, 11:05 AM
 
1,677 posts, read 1,970,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
I'm not so sure. The themes may have changed, but the stereotypes are still there.



I agree that society has socialized children to engage in gender-specific play, and that is to be accepted to a degree. But it goes beyond that when camping gadgets, puzzles, and science related toys are gender-oriented, don't you think?
I think any toy can be gender neutral. It is the manufacturer that specifies what gender their toy is for. Any child can play with board games, video games, legos, blocks, balls, puzzles, and a number of other things. But the manufacturer will package it a certain way, use a specific gender child for advertising, and it becomes a girl or boy toy. For Christmas I got my dd a Fisher Price doctor set. There were two offered, on with blue doctor case and a little boy on the packaging, and one pink on with a little girl advertised. They both had the exact same things in them. I got her the pink one, just because she likes pink better than blue, but if there had been no pink available blue would have been fine. I really didn't see the purpose of having a girl and a boy doctor set or anything else. Kids know what they like to play with and shouldn't be made to feel that they can't, because it's for "girls" or "boys".
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:19 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
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I'm torn. On one hand, I agree that the blue-pink segregation is not ideal, but on the other hand I sometimes feel like people think it's a bad thing for girls to like girly things. It's okay for a girl to play with Legos, have a doctor kit, kick a soccer ball, run around outside, play with trucks and bugs and dinosaurs, and do things that boys do. I get the feeling sometimes that it's not okay for girls to like wearing pink things, baking cookies, dressing up like a princess, or playing with dolls.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:53 AM
 
Location: North America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioChic View Post
I honestly couldnt tell you why. It's kind of like in the thread about the little boy asking for the doll and carriage. It's just strange. i guess if he REALLY wanted them what could I do? I would get them. But I wouldnt introduce them to him without him asking first.

Because society has conditioned you to believe that barbies are for little girls and not for boys.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:55 AM
 
Location: North America
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I think parents should let the kids choose themselves on what THEY prefer and not ramrod it down their throats nor deny them the choice by making it all gender neutral. Growing up gender neutral i developed my own sense of tastes and styles. My sister likes frilly stuff, but hates girlish pastel colors. I can't stand frilly things, but pink/purple and my 2 favorite colors of all time. Your child's natural personality is going to come out as they get older no matter what toys you allow them to have.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I'm torn. On one hand, I agree that the blue-pink segregation is not ideal, but on the other hand I sometimes feel like people think it's a bad thing for girls to like girly things. It's okay for a girl to play with Legos, have a doctor kit, kick a soccer ball, run around outside, play with trucks and bugs and dinosaurs, and do things that boys do. I get the feeling sometimes that it's not okay for girls to like wearing pink things, baking cookies, dressing up like a princess, or playing with dolls.
If a little girl naturally likes pink and girly things, that's one thing. For a parent to automatically assume, because they have a girl, everything needs to be pink and fluffy and not offer any alternative, that's another thing. Some little girls would rather play with dinosaurs and trucks. Some little boys would rather play with dolls. I think no matter what a child's preference is, they should be allowed to play with what they want.

I admit to trying not to be "too" girly with my dd. I used to hate when she was younger, shopping for clothes and finding nothing but pink. I didn't mind her being a girly girl, but it's the whole "princess" attitude I was worried about.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaNomus View Post
If a little girl naturally likes pink and girly things, that's one thing. For a parent to automatically assume, because they have a girl, everything needs to be pink and fluffy and not offer any alternative, that's another thing. Some little girls would rather play with dinosaurs and trucks. Some little boys would rather play with dolls. I think no matter what a child's preference is, they should be allowed to play with what they want.

I admit to trying not to be "too" girly with my dd. I used to hate when she was younger, shopping for clothes and finding nothing but pink. I didn't mind her being a girly girl, but it's the whole "princess" attitude I was worried about.
yeah clothes wise I get comments all the time about DD dressing in "boy" clothes. I have lots and lots of baby blue stuff with cars or trucks on them I think there cute so what its not pink with flowers.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:09 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
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I hear that, Anna. I don't like the princess attitude either. I am just not convinced that toys like Polly Pocket and Lego Ladyfigs (which look very much like Polly Pocket) are pigeonholing them somehow. Like I said, I'm torn.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
We have an "issue", if you can call it that, with Thomas stuff for our daughter. She loves everything Thomas, and we have a whole bunch of Thomas clothes, icluding underwear, that are boys.

Now I don't mind her wearing boys' stuff at all, but it would be nice if they realized that girls like Thomas too, and would make a small line of Thomas specific clothes for girls.

As for the other stuff, she doesn't mind that tools and whatnot are packaged for boys, but if she was a boy and into Barbie, I can see that might be a different story, as far as adults feeling comfortable buying it at least.
When I see a girl proudly carrying a Thomas the Tank lunch box I see a confident girl who says, "Pffffffttt" to the marketers who want to pigeon hole her in a demographic. She's saying "I'm going to do what best suits ME".

Yeah. I LIKE the little girl with the Thomas the Tank stuff!
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:33 PM
 
Location: North America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I hear that, Anna. I don't like the princess attitude either. I am just not convinced that toys like Polly Pocket and Lego Ladyfigs (which look very much like Polly Pocket) are pigeonholing them somehow. Like I said, I'm torn.

It gives the message that only girls like polly pocket....or that only girls like pink. That is the main issue i have problems with, the fact that we condition boys and girls from birth to accept certain things. OhioChic *just using her as an example is all * makes a perfect example in saying that she would not buy her boy a Barbie if he asked. Then she would have to give the explanation that barbies are for little girls but G.I. Joes are for little boys etc etc. Little things like this build up, and over time spill into how we view gender roles and other views on what men and women should be.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidkitty View Post
It gives the message that only girls like polly pocket....or that only girls like pink. That is the main issue i have problems with, the fact that we condition boys and girls from birth to accept certain things. OhioChic *just using her as an example is all * makes a perfect example in saying that she would not buy her boy a Barbie if he asked. Then she would have to give the explanation that barbies are for little girls but G.I. Joes are for little boys etc etc. Little things like this build up, and over time spill into how we view gender roles and other views on what men and women should be.
So do you think that Polly Pocket should not exist? Or should Polly Pocket expand into Timmy Tiny, with a bunch of unisex playsets? Do you think that boys would play with them?
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