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Old 12-30-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,089 posts, read 99,190,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
I don't entirely agree. The packaging and the advertising is very gender-specific for a lot of toys. The parents can do their best to counteract that, but won't always be successful, assuming they even want to.

Over the holidays i dug out a box of of toys that contained some wooden puzzles from about 30-40 years ago. The girl puzzle had baby carriage, an armoire full of clothes, and an iron! At least we've made progress from that!
It seemed to me, when my girls were little, that toys for the younger ones were more gender-specific than ones for the older kids. As they get older, puzzles, games and sports equipment are more popular, and more neutral. That said, we always felt we gave our kids a lot of gender free stuff, but then we'd go to a home with boys and find out how different their toys were.

Having been a kid in the 50s/60s, I agree that things have improved a lot since then. I never even had sports equipment, there were no sports leagues for girls, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I'm torn. On one hand, I agree that the blue-pink segregation is not ideal, but on the other hand I sometimes feel like people think it's a bad thing for girls to like girly things. It's okay for a girl to play with Legos, have a doctor kit, kick a soccer ball, run around outside, play with trucks and bugs and dinosaurs, and do things that boys do. I get the feeling sometimes that it's not okay for girls to like wearing pink things, baking cookies, dressing up like a princess, or playing with dolls.
I just repped you over on the breast feeding thread, so I'll just say, I agree completely, esp. with the underlined. I always noticed when my kids played with boys, they did either neutral or "boy" things, never girly things.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:53 PM
 
Location: North America
14,212 posts, read 9,670,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
So do you think that Polly Pocket should not exist? Or should Polly Pocket expand into Timmy Tiny, with a bunch of unisex playsets? Do you think that boys would play with them?

I think if your daughter wants a polly pocket then let her get that. But if she shows no preference then give her an equal amount of boy and girl toys. Her personal style will show through as she gets older, and she wouldn't believe that she is required to like certain things because she is a girl.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:43 PM
 
11,617 posts, read 19,788,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidkitty View Post
I think if your daughter wants a polly pocket then let her get that. But if she shows no preference then give her an equal amount of boy and girl toys. Her personal style will show through as she gets older, and she wouldn't believe that she is required to like certain things because she is a girl.
I agree that when kids get older they ask for things that they like. The one thing I remember from my sons being little is that it was difficult to buy a toy kitchen that wasn't girly looking. My boys liked the toy kitchen and all three of them played with it but it was really hard to find one that didn't look really girly.

As my boys aged they asked for mostly boy specific toys. However, I do remember that my youngest son asked me for a baby doll. My other sons never asked for one. I always thought it was because when my older boys were little I had a real baby in the house. My youngest never experienced that. I bought my son the baby doll he asked for. I never thought it was a big deal, it was just a toy.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,109,599 times
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I got a toy kitchen for my son too, Momma_bear. Target had a nice, sturdy wooden one in blue a few years back. My mom got one for my nephew in a beautiful deep red, which is cool because the real kitchen in her house has accessories in the same red. So the little kitchen goes perfectly in there.

Kidkraft Deluxe Let

I agree that it's great to be able to find kitchens that will appeal to boys and girls, like the one above. The similar toys that are shown on that page all include boys and girls.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:03 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,793,730 times
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If you really want to make gender-free toys, then you need to do away with Barbie entirely. And all dolls, both male and female. Baby wetsalot would no longer exist, since you have to make it gender-free, and that means no penis, and no -lack- of penis to imply a female either.

Pink has always been a "traditional" color for girls, and blue has always been a "traditional" color for boys. Some people LIKE tradition. Some people don't. And for that reason, I'm glad there is still a choice. You don't like pink, fine. Get purple instead. But don't tell me I can't pick pink for my god-daughter just because the idea is offensive to you.

I DO think it's silly for Leggo to do the whole girl thing, because traditionally, Leggo is already gender neutral. They are now -adding- a gender-traditional color, which never existed in their products before. That, I think is silly. But hey - if it sells, who am I to complain? I just won't get the pink Leggos and stick to the traditional ones.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:10 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,109,599 times
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I don't know if this should go in this thread or the specific "Legos for girls" thread, but touching on what you said, Anon, I wonder how well the Harry Potter Legos are selling among boys and girls. Harry Potter seems to appeal to both. Most of the Lego sets are more boy-oriented, with all-boy minifigures. Harry Potter at least has Hermione as one of the central characters.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
3,388 posts, read 3,236,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I'm torn. On one hand, I agree that the blue-pink segregation is not ideal, but on the other hand I sometimes feel like people think it's a bad thing for girls to like girly things. It's okay for a girl to play with Legos, have a doctor kit, kick a soccer ball, run around outside, play with trucks and bugs and dinosaurs, and do things that boys do. I get the feeling sometimes that it's not okay for girls to like wearing pink things, baking cookies, dressing up like a princess, or playing with dolls.
I tend towards a moderation in all things approach to most parenting issues, including this one. My son has a kitchen and a doll because he loves cooking and was about to have a baby sister. When my daughter gets old enough for toys, I'll be purchasing what she's interested in, regardless of branding. Princess stuff makes me cringe, but if that's what she likes at any particular point in time, I'll support that, as much as I'll support if she wants erector sets or monster trucks.

I agree that in the quest for "gender neutral" some people can end up forcing their views on their kids ("Jimmy must have a doll; Sally shouldn't play princess dress up"). In my mind, that is just as bad as forcing girls to have "girl toys" and boys to have "boy toys." What I'd like to see is kids playing with what they like, regardless of who it is marketed towards and parents encouraging a wide variety of toy types while pushing none of them.

Interesting topic, Zimbo!
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:16 PM
 
11,617 posts, read 19,788,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I got a toy kitchen for my son too, Momma_bear. Target had a nice, sturdy wooden one in blue a few years back. My mom got one for my nephew in a beautiful deep red, which is cool because the real kitchen in her house has accessories in the same red. So the little kitchen goes perfectly in there.

Kidkraft Deluxe Let

I agree that it's great to be able to find kitchens that will appeal to boys and girls, like the one above. The similar toys that are shown on that page all include boys and girls.
My kids are older than yours. My oldest is almost 18 years old. Little Tikes did make a neutral toy kitchen that my kids played with for years but I had to drive around to a whole bunch of stores to find one that had the gender neutral color scheme.

BTW-all three of my sons LOVED housekeeping toys and they are really masculine all boy type boys.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:17 PM
 
11,617 posts, read 19,788,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastwesteastagain View Post
I tend towards a moderation in all things approach to most parenting issues, including this one. My son has a kitchen and a doll because he loves cooking and was about to have a baby sister. When my daughter gets old enough for toys, I'll be purchasing what she's interested in, regardless of branding. Princess stuff makes me cringe, but if that's what she likes at any particular point in time, I'll support that, as much as I'll support if she wants erector sets or monster trucks.

I agree that in the quest for "gender neutral" some people can end up forcing their views on their kids ("Jimmy must have a doll; Sally shouldn't play princess dress up"). In my mind, that is just as bad as forcing girls to have "girl toys" and boys to have "boy toys." What I'd like to see is kids playing with what they like, regardless of who it is marketed towards and parents encouraging a wide variety of toy types while pushing none of them.

Interesting topic, Zimbo!
Agreed. It's easy to over think these things. They are just toys.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:20 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,109,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastwesteastagain View Post
I tend towards a moderation in all things approach to most parenting issues, including this one. My son has a kitchen and a doll because he loves cooking and was about to have a baby sister. When my daughter gets old enough for toys, I'll be purchasing what she's interested in, regardless of branding. Princess stuff makes me cringe, but if that's what she likes at any particular point in time, I'll support that, as much as I'll support if she wants erector sets or monster trucks.

I agree that in the quest for "gender neutral" some people can end up forcing their views on their kids ("Jimmy must have a doll; Sally shouldn't play princess dress up"). In my mind, that is just as bad as forcing girls to have "girl toys" and boys to have "boy toys." What I'd like to see is kids playing with what they like, regardless of who it is marketed towards and parents encouraging a wide variety of toy types while pushing none of them.

Interesting topic, Zimbo!
One of my little cousins is six, and my uncle has a post-Christmas picture of her last year in a tutu (from my mom) and pink sparkly boots (from us), in the middle of a spectacular spinout in her racing go-cart (from him). It's awesome.
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