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Old 01-11-2012, 08:28 PM
 
Location: IL
12,173 posts, read 6,124,184 times
Reputation: 11801

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellar View Post
This is not necessarily true. Some kids who are having allergic reactions throw up and others do not. My daughter did not have a throwing up incident until she was 7. When she was younger, her first sign of a reaction was hives and itching, which then would be followed by swelling, wheezing etc. Most kids have multiple symptoms during a reaction.
The most common food allergy symptoms include:

Tingling or itching in the mouth
Hives, itching or eczema
Swelling of the lips, face, tongue and throat, or other parts of the body
Wheezing, nasal congestion or trouble breathing
Abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting
Dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting
I was talking about severe allergic reactions to food. The majority of which are pre-empted by vomiting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellar View Post
As for using the Epipen, if you have a child with allergies you end up passing along an Epipen to all kinds of people when they are younger. I have given my daughter's Epipen to preschool teachers, teenage babysitters, camp directors and other parents. Many schools train all teachers on how to use an Epipen. I have trained many people myself. You certainly don't have to be a nurse to administer an Epipen.
Yes indeed that is true. You are taking my posts out of context. When I was talking about non-medical people giving Epi-Pens, it was in reference to the proposal that there be stock of Epi-Pen in schools in case children who had no authorization or medications of their own needed them. We were discussing who would make the determination that a child with no prior knowledge was indeed having an allergic reaction, and who would give the Epi-Pen.
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:11 PM
Status: "Truthiness Forever" (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
26,538 posts, read 17,907,833 times
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More on this tragic story.

Allergic Girl Who Died at School Got Peanut From Another Child - ABC News
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:22 PM
 
Location: IL
12,173 posts, read 6,124,184 times
Reputation: 11801
What a terrible tragedy.

It is quite surprising that a child with such a severe allergy would take food they know they are allergic to. My son is deathly afraid of the food he is allergic to, and has been since he was about 5.

What we can learn from this awful situation is that parents of children with severe allergies need to be vigilent, vigilent, vigilent, and then even more vigilent and make sure everyone, but especially the child, is educated regarding the allergy, and the consequences.
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: IL
12,173 posts, read 6,124,184 times
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There is some really interesting information in this article.

Girl's death highlights allergy safety in schools - CNN.com
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Old 01-11-2012, 10:22 PM
 
2,155 posts, read 2,378,415 times
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I am confused by this part "The girl had received a peanut from another child unaware of Ammaria's allergy, police said" from the story. They, the media, are trying to blame the girl who gave the child the peanut, but at 7yrs old, the child should have know she couldn't touch them let alone eat them

And then this "When it comes to a life-threatening allergic reaction, it's so simple to save that life," said Maria Acebal, chief executive officer of the Fairfax, Va.-based Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network, which championed the bill. "I have no doubt that the school where this little girl went had an EpiPen in the office -- it just didn't have Ammaria's name on it." So, what if they used someone else epi- than that child needed it? Why didn't this little girls mother have the epi-pen for her?

I do believe that there are true allergies, but I also believe that a lot of them are not as severe as both parents and doctors make it seem. Food sensitivies I will buy, but I have a hard time buying the "A well-regarded national study published in the journal Pediatrics this past summer estimated that 8 percent of children — that’s 5.9 million kids — suffer from food allergies.

The report also found that close to 40 percent of those children suffer severe reactions." as posted here: New peanut butter Cheerios triggers anger from parents

By the media and medical field creating hype of allergies and parents getting fearful and keeping their children away from certain foods even way before being diagnosed with any kind of allergy, all we are doing is creating more kids from becoming allergic to ingredients. We need to go back to the day when it was ok to play in the dirt and not have to anti-bacterial products in everything. Do you know how hard it is to find anti-bacterial soap anymore? Ugh

As for this "There is no cure for food allergies" That is not true, well exactly. Some doctors have started therapy to build up immunities against the allergen by injected into the body (via shots, food, liquid, ect) in small doses and increasing the dose over a period of time depending on the person reacted. I actually have seen two shows about it and was surprised how well a man overcame severe allergy to shellfood

JMHO
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Old 01-12-2012, 07:55 AM
 
500 posts, read 582,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
I was talking about severe allergic reactions to food. The majority of which are pre-empted by vomiting.

.
I am talking about severe reactions as well. You absolutely can have a severe reaction and not throw up. The second time I gave my daughter an Epipen she was not vomiting. At my kids' school, there was a boy who is allergic to tree nuts who had a severe reaction that also did not involve vomiting. He could not breathe because his throat was closing. It is dangerous to think that only a child who throws up could be having a severe reaction. Here is an example of a story of a child who died, who did not throw up during her final reaction:

Sabrina

And another one:
http://www.foodallergyangel.com/docu...;s%20Story.pdf

And another one where it does not appear vomiting occurred:

Teen dies after eating cookie containing peanut *| ajc.com

I think it is important for parents of allergy children to understand that they need to look for several signs of distress and not to just count on a pattern of reaction. In the worst reaction my daughter had, she did not react like she had done in the past, and this did confuse me at the time.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:01 AM
Status: "Truthiness Forever" (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
26,538 posts, read 17,907,833 times
Reputation: 31735
So I'm wondering: Does anybody know if public teachers are given any courses or info about these allergies? Not that it is their responsibility- but if I were in charge of 20+ kids I think I would want information about what signs to look for and first aid. or are they not even allowed to touch a kid in trouble anymore?

We certainly do ask a lot of our teachers these days.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:05 AM
 
Location: IL
12,173 posts, read 6,124,184 times
Reputation: 11801
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellar View Post
I am talking about severe reactions as well. You absolutely can have a severe reaction and not throw up. The second time I gave my daughter an Epipen she was not vomiting. At my kids' school, there was a boy who is allergic to tree nuts who had a severe reaction that also did not involve vomiting. He could not breathe because his throat was closing. It is dangerous to think that only a child who throws up could be having a severe reaction. Here is an example of a story of a child who died, who did not throw up during her final reaction:

Sabrina

And another one:
http://www.foodallergyangel.com/docu...;s%20Story.pdf

And another one where it does not appear vomiting occurred:

Teen dies after eating cookie containing peanut *| ajc.com

I think it is important for parents of allergy children to understand that they need to look for several signs of distress and not to just count on a pattern of reaction. In the worst reaction my daughter had, she did not react like she had done in the past, and this did confuse me at the time.
And hence my use of the word majority. This also reinforces that it is crucial to have school nurses in all schools. Relying on teachers to make a diagnosis is exceedingly dangerous.
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:28 AM
 
8,012 posts, read 4,078,589 times
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What are the risks of administering an epipen when it is unwarranted?
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: IL
12,173 posts, read 6,124,184 times
Reputation: 11801
Quote:
Originally Posted by somebodynew View Post
What are the risks of administering an epipen when it is unwarranted?
1) You are not treating the real medical issue.

2) Nasty side effect a: Very high heart rate. If you have an underlying heart condition, this could be lethal.

b: A terrible headache.

c: Gives you the shakes and nausea.

Side-effects take about 3 hours to wear off.

3) The injector must be trained, the injection must be given in the muscle of the outer thigh. Injecting into a vein is very dangerous. Injecting into the buttocks reduces the effectiveness of the drug.
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