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Old 01-09-2012, 07:56 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,824,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltheEndofTime View Post
Studies have shown anything more than 15 hours is usually detrimental to one's school work.
Can you cite the source for that?

I know many who worked more than 15 hours and still managed to make dean's list...
including my kids!
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:28 AM
 
530 posts, read 961,177 times
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The studies I've read said it can be detrimental for teens to work more than 20 hours during the school year:

- USATODAY.com

Problems Seen For Teenagers Who Hold Jobs - New York Times

Should Your Teen Work?
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:39 AM
 
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Our kids have summer jobs. They are too busy with school, school activities, etc. to work during the school year. They started these summer jobs when they were 15. They work about 20 hours/week in the summer until marching band starts then they cut back because marching band runs about 8 hours/day. They have the rest of their lives to work and only a very short time to be a kid. As long as they are involved in school activities they won't have jobs. I couldn't imagine forcing my child to work 40 hours/week while they are still in high school (which is illegal here anyway).
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,744,189 times
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I have to agree with golfgal and other who see school work and extra curriculum activities as more important than working. Our son and daughter were both very active in Marching band (DD drum major her sr year), scouts (DS Eagle Scout at 16), taking AP courses and other individual activities. We gave them a reasonable allowance for all their clothes, haircuts, social activities and we let them decide how to spend it.

For example DS decided he would rather have money for music so he started cutting his own hair and not caring about clothes.

DD worked in hair salon on Saturdays when she could. DS worked at Ace Hardware and Home depot after he decided working was more important than marching band. We let them make their own decisions and never coerced them either way. We supported with transportation to and from but we never bought them a car.

From what I read, jobs for teens are hard to come by these days. I think you can instill a good work ethic by example and without forcing your teens to get a job while they are in high school. After they graduate it is either more schoool or work. No hanging around home on the dole.
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:53 AM
 
Location: here
24,477 posts, read 28,802,318 times
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I started working at 17, and worked all the way through college minus one semester abroad. I think having a summer job or a part time job in college helps establish a work history and helps with getting a full time job later. Working in high school was a little hard. Working in college is no big deal because fewer hours are spent in class. I guess what I expect of my kids will depend on what they want to spend money on. My parents didn't have to tell me to go out and get a job. I wanted to on my own. Hopefully when the time is right, my kids will do the same.

ETA I had a few friends in college who never worked. They were able to get jobs after college and seemed to have a fine work ethic. At the time they seemed spoiled, but they turned out ok.
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:58 AM
 
Location: here
24,477 posts, read 28,802,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
Can you cite the source for that?

I know many who worked more than 15 hours and still managed to make dean's list...
including my kids!
I think it depends on the kid. I got a job as Christmas help at a dept store at 16. It was 2 weekday evenings and weekends. I completely quit doing my math homework and went from an A to a C. I didn't work the rest of that school year, but got a job the next summer and worked more manageable hours the following school year. I didn't do a bunch of extracurriculars either though.
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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I started working at 11 (delivering newspapers, back when kids could still do that), started working weekends and summers at an amusement park at 14, and worked as a bank teller during the summers/breaks during the day throughout college, also waitressing at night and on weekends. It was expected that the kids in my family contribute to our own expenses and savings, but my parents made our academics a priority over work and taught us to balance them. DH was also expected to work as soon as he was able to, but his mom didn't put the same emphasis on academics.

We will expect our kids to have some kind of gainful employment during the summers starting when they can get working papers. I'm not a fan of work competing with academics during the year, so if we can avoid that, we will. I believe the right balance of work instills a sense of pride, self-reliance and responsibility. I think too much work (which will depend on the teen and the other obligations, of course) can be stressful and interfere with school responsibilities. JMO.

ETA: I do think it's kind of messed up to reference a thread from another sub forum. I have no idea what that person's situation is/was and it's not mine to judge.

Last edited by eastwesteastagain; 01-09-2012 at 09:17 AM..
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Old 01-09-2012, 10:14 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 89,161,157 times
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I totally agree with everyone else that school and activities are more important than work. Going to school is their job.

If mine wanted to work, they could work as long as it didn't interfere their achievement at school. I never dictated work.
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Old 01-09-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Wherever women are
19,022 posts, read 24,725,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omigawd View Post
My daughter has been working since she's about 5 or 6. She's done a lot of acting and modeling work. However, when do I expect her to get regular job? Probably around 14 when she can get working papers. Even if she's only working 10 hours a week, it will still teach her something. By the time she's 16, I expect her to be working 25 hours per week. By 18? 35-40 hours per week. I don't think I'll ever have to "make" her work since she knows if she wants certain things, she has to earn her own money to get them (currently, through her allowance or extra household chores).

There's no way --- barring disability or chronic illness --- that I would have a 25 year old loafing around my home, never having worked.
omigawd
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Old 01-09-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Wherever women are
19,022 posts, read 24,725,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltheEndofTime View Post
How old is too old to never have a job? I started working at 17, my brother 16, and my mom was 13/14 when she started working on a tobacco farm. I'm just so shocked and disgusted at the number of twenty and thirty somethings out there that have never worked. I think it is a fundamental part of growing up and learning how to stand on your own two feet.

That being said, when will you MAKE your child get a job? At what age do you expect your kid to start working a paid job?
I have to defend Gen Y. Becoz their paltry situation and ruined outlook of a post-college life is a direct consequence of baby boomer excesses and a culture of debt which was perpetrated by the parents of today which has severely diminished employment, fueled globalization and has brought salaries to ground zero levels. It's economics. People need to stop individualizing families and look at the broader economic perspective. Gen Y will have to compensate for your failures over the next 3 or 4 decades, that's the sad truth.
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