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Old 01-15-2012, 08:30 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,551 posts, read 50,819,831 times
Reputation: 60578

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My daughter worked on weekends cleaning out the stables and turning the horses out at the place where she took her lessons. This was when she was around 13 - 14.

She got a job in Dunkin Donuts when she was 16 and worked there for most of high school. She did some work-study in her freshman year of school, transferred to another school and didn't work her sophomore year, and she just returned from studying abroad in Asia, where she did some modeling and some hostess work at special business events. She was hired because she was a foreigner there and different-looking. She also tutored some Chinese students in English.

I'm hoping she either finds an internship or a job for the summer this year.

She knows I will not tolerate her sitting around unemployed after college!!!!
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Old 02-09-2012, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,809,051 times
Reputation: 47043
Default Unrealistic to expect 20 something to be self sufficient?

This economy has affected so many aspects of our lives but apparently most parents don't even expect their 20 somethings to be independant. The old adage "At your age I owned a house had 3 kids and a savings account" is comparing apples to oranges.

Do you agree?
How are you prepared to keep supporting a young adult way past normal age?
Are you sacrificing your own retirement to do that?

Life Inc. - Generation Y remains upbeat, thanks to Mom and Dad
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Old 02-09-2012, 06:44 AM
 
11,617 posts, read 19,777,687 times
Reputation: 12056
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
This economy has affected so many aspects of our lives but apparently most parents don't even expect their 20 somethings to be independant. The old adage "At your age I owned a house had 3 kids and a savings account" is comparing apples to oranges.

Do you agree?
How are you prepared to keep supporting a young adult way past normal age?
Are you sacrificing your own retirement to do that?

Life Inc. - Generation Y remains upbeat, thanks to Mom and Dad
I would not mind supporting my kids into young adulthood as long as they are productive in their lives. My oldest has been accepted to college. We intend to support him through college. If he goes to Navy (he has possible medical issues) he will have a job when he gets out of college. If he goes to a civilian college he will have to look for a job when he graduates, just like everyone else.

We are financially comfortable. We have a big house with plenty of space. If my kids were on the road to self sufficiency I would continue to support them until they were finally there. Especially if they were under employed, or having difficulty finding employment. My kids are pretty independent and I cannot see them sitting around the house doing nothing.

Our kids are all very good students and have college aspirations. We are prepared to help them through college which means that we know that they will not be financially independent at age 18, or even 20. The economy has not changed that for us. However, if the situation is that they need support for longer we are prepared to help them as long as they need our help.

My parents and my husband's parents helped us get started as young adults. My parents paid for school, provided a place for me to live until I got married (at 22) and helped me buy my first car. My husband's parents gave us a car when we first got married and lent us money to buy our first home. We still needed help as new college graduates and the economy was much better when we graduated (1987 for me, 1988 for dh).

That said, parents are not obligated to help young adult children.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:11 PM
 
541 posts, read 799,390 times
Reputation: 525
Default How old is it to live with parents?

I'm just curious on how old do you think is too old to be living with parents....

I'm 30 and still live with my parents.



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Old 02-15-2012, 09:17 PM
 
2,779 posts, read 4,511,890 times
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Sounds like a personal problem.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:18 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,766,605 times
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In which country, as a member of which culture?

In the USA, under most circumstances, you wouldn't "still" be living with your parents at age 30. You might have moved *back* to their house, especially given today's economy. But generally speaking you'd have moved out either during your college years, or shortly thereafter, to experience life as an independent contributing member of society.

In some cultures, you stay home til your parents arrange a marriage for you (such as the Travelers). But in the case of the Travelers, a girl would be married by the time she was 17 and in some Traveler communities, 12- and 13-year old brides are not unheard of. So in the case of the Travelers, if you were a girl, you'd be moved out of your parents' house before you finished puberty.

Not sure what culture invites their children to -stay- at home til 30. Unless you're caring for your elderly parents and providing for them financially, I'd say you probably outlived your welcome around 10 years ago.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:18 PM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,237,794 times
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I wouldn't say there's an age that it's too old if it works out for everyone. Ofcourse, if you're 30 and leeching off your parents (not paying rent or contributing to the household), then that's more of a problem for you than your parents in the long-run.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:23 PM
 
Location: here
24,483 posts, read 28,837,213 times
Reputation: 31077
It depends on the circumstances. I'd be a little more lenient with the number given the current job market.

Why do you still live with your parents?
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,967,130 times
Reputation: 17414
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryhoyarbie View Post
I'm just curious on how old do you think is too old to be living with parents....

I'm 30 and still live with my parents.




Until they say you can't bring chicks over to spend the night anymore.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:33 PM
 
541 posts, read 799,390 times
Reputation: 525
I was just curious........I don't have a problem with it at all.



I did live with my older brother while in college for 3 years from 2002 to 2005 until I graduated, then I moved back in with the parents.


As to why I still live with my parents, lack of decent paying jobs, although I just got a contract job for 14 dollars an hour, which is the highest paying job I've ever had.
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