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Old 01-17-2012, 01:43 PM
 
Location: North America
14,212 posts, read 9,611,695 times
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How upset would you be with them? And i mean a 180 sort of situation, not they switch churches sort of deal. They become pagan, or Islamic, or Hindu
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,696,560 times
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I would not be happy... but it's their choice!
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:50 PM
 
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Not very. We raise our kids within our belief system, but as they get older it is ultimately their choice as to what they want to believe. I think I would be more afraid of my kid becoming so taken up in our religion that they put the blinders on and stop questioning things, then I would be of them choosing a different religion that appeals to them.

We want to give our kids a foundation so that they have a frame of reference for what we believe and our culture and traditions that we value as a family. We also believe that they should be given the tools to ask questions and explore other ideas. If that exploration leads them down another spiritual (or lack of spiritual) path, then so be it.

One of the things that my wife and I have been grappling with is the idea of confirmation. In most mainstream Christian churches this is done between 12 and 14 years of age. In our opinion this is simply too young for someone to make the types of pledges and promises that are made at that time. I would rather them wait and make that type of pledge when they are older and making the choice for themself. I only mention this as an example of the general philosophy we are taking.
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:57 PM
 
1,933 posts, read 3,135,227 times
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A forewarning Lucidkitty, if you are going to start same topic on a closed thread then remember to keep it on topic. The last one got closed because it veered off topic.

Children and Religion - question.
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:57 PM
 
12,913 posts, read 19,782,209 times
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I wouldn't care, at all. There was a very recent thread about this same subject, btw.
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:58 PM
 
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Ah Mrs X, that's the one I was thinking about.
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Old 01-17-2012, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,226 posts, read 23,743,496 times
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Isn't religion kind of brainwashing?

I am what my mother told me to be,

like she was what her mother told her

...and on and on.
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Old 01-17-2012, 02:51 PM
 
14,777 posts, read 34,490,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
Isn't religion kind of brainwashing?

I am what my mother told me to be,

like she was what her mother told her

...and on and on.
I think religion is different things to different people. Whether or not it appeals to you in general or a certain religion in particular is entirely subjective.

Many things are tantamount to brainwashing in the same way you say religion is. School would be one thing that comes to mind. Now, most people find a much more practical application for school then they do for religion; but school at its core, is essentially there to train children to function appropriately in society and buy into the commonly accepted version of events. Is there really a difference between reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and reciting, say the Lord's prayer?

Religion to me has a lot to offer in terms of tradition and values. There is a lot that can be learned there as long as one can look past the dogma.
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Old 01-17-2012, 02:55 PM
 
Location: North America
14,212 posts, read 9,611,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOriginalMrsX View Post
A forewarning Lucidkitty, if you are going to start same topic on a closed thread then remember to keep it on topic. The last one got closed because it veered off topic.

Children and Religion - question.

Oh lord did i reply in that one too ? ~having a blond moment~....and i'm not blond.
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Old 01-17-2012, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Wherever women are
19,022 posts, read 24,673,685 times
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Is there a way to write a will that the kiddie gets nothing if he becomes atheist?

My old country allows that.
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