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Old 01-26-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Oxford, Connecticut
523 posts, read 835,949 times
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Where I live gifted programs function pretty much the same way they did when I was growing up. Out of a grade level with about 200 kids only 5 or 6 are considered "gifted" and are pulled out for enrichment purposes. Before 3rd grade it's considered "enrichment" and after 3rd they actually call it a TAG program.

To be honest I've never heard a parent call their child gifted in person. (OK that's not true I know one person who implies it but has never actually uttered those words) I've seen it all over a variety of forums but never in person. IRL I actually hear the opposite -people discussing a variety of learning disorders affecting their kids and why they aren't up to par. More complaints in essence.

I also don't understand it when I see people calling their child gifted because they read a few grade levels above their actual grade. More often on some of the parenting boards than CD. In my children's public school, last year over 95% of third graders met the grade level standards on the state proficiency test. Over 70% met the "goal" level which in actuality is a few grade levels ahead. That would make over 70% of the third grade class gifted! Please.
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Old 01-26-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
1,820 posts, read 3,903,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laulob View Post
Where I live gifted programs function pretty much the same way they did when I was growing up. Out of a grade level with about 200 kids only 5 or 6 are considered "gifted" and are pulled out for enrichment purposes. Before 3rd grade it's considered "enrichment" and after 3rd they actually call it a TAG program.

To be honest I've never heard a parent call their child gifted in person. (OK that's not true I know one person who implies it but has never actually uttered those words) I've seen it all over a variety of forums but never in person. IRL I actually hear the opposite -people discussing a variety of learning disorders affecting their kids and why they aren't up to par. More complaints in essence.

I also don't understand it when I see people calling their child gifted because they read a few grade levels above their actual grade. More often on some of the parenting boards than CD. In my children's public school, last year over 95% of third graders met the grade level standards on the state proficiency test. Over 70% met the "goal" level which in actuality is a few grade levels ahead. That would make over 70% of the third grade class gifted! Please.
Exactly! Our school ranks in the 90% for reading & math...
Unfortunately though, we do see this argument consistently at our PTA meetings... That parents feel their children should be placed in the higher performing groups...
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:08 PM
 
556 posts, read 673,483 times
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I see more parents jumping on the syndrome wagon because they're kids are mediocre . The bad behaved have ADD, the really bad behaved ADHD, bad eaters have sensory disorders, slow reader = dyslexia, no friends aspergers. The answer is NEVER mediocrity or ineffective parenting.
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:13 PM
 
Location: here
24,477 posts, read 28,789,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kel6604 View Post
I see more parents jumping on the syndrome wagon because they're kids are mediocre . The bad behaved have ADD, the really bad behaved ADHD, bad eaters have sensory disorders, slow reader = dyslexia, no friends aspergers. The answer is NEVER mediocrity or ineffective parenting.
I'm sure there is some of that going on, but by no means is it the majority. Please don't judge people you don't know anything about. There are real neurological issues out there, that you obviously haven't had to deal with, and know nothing about.
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:39 PM
 
1,135 posts, read 1,986,578 times
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Come to central Vermont. Here we have a special ed epidemic. No, I'm not talking about kids with autism or classic learning disabilities that require special attention and services.

Rather, half our education budget goes to "special" children who can't sit still, respect their teachers, or interact with their classmates without beating them up. Many need a personal para-educator "kid cop" to shadow them throughout the day.

Then of course you have the child that needs access to an indoor swing b/c of sensory issues, the kid who needs horse-therapy (administered off site and billed to the school) and the kids who need a taxi cab service to and from school b/c they are too disruptive on the bus and their parents can't/won't drive them.

Because all of the money that's used for these services, we haven't added a program for non-special students (gifted or not) in years and two years ago we slashed several excellent teachers who haven't been replaced.

I wouldn't mind having some of these "my child is gifted" parents instead of "I can't parent my child so let the schools do it" type of parents.

Last edited by LisaMc46; 01-26-2012 at 02:42 PM.. Reason: added autism to first paragraph
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:50 PM
 
12,932 posts, read 19,837,337 times
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We have never been able to request our kids go into gifted classes. In each case, the request came from their teachers, and required confirmation via IQ testing, teacher recommendations, and grades.

I think the push by parents to get their children into these programs is a result of county schools rather than neighborhood schools. When we moved from NJ to FL, our youngest had been identified as eligible for the gifted program in NJ. FL didn't care, told us the gifted track was full, and he would be placed in a regular ed class. It was a horrible year for him. He was in a large class, and one his teacher admitted was behavior-challenged. It was a male teacher, and he was deemed more able to handle behavioral issues.

After that year, I joined the ranks of parents who weren't willing to see their kids sacrificed because of class limits. In this case, it was easy,. because DS aced the standardized tests and his teacher had sent the recommendation anyway.

When I went to school, the classes and schools were smaller. The brightest weren't held back because the less bright were not ready to move on. That was their problem, and the parents were urged to either work with them or find somebody who would. If not the kids were held back. Social advancement was not an issue.
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:51 PM
 
Location: here
24,477 posts, read 28,789,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaMc46 View Post
Come to central Vermont. Here we have a special ed epidemic. No, I'm not talking about kids with autism or classic learning disabilities that require special attention and services.

Rather, half our education budget goes to "special" children who can't sit still, respect their teachers, or interact with their classmates without beating them up. Many need a personal para-educator "kid cop" to shadow them throughout the day.

Then of course you have the child that needs access to an indoor swing b/c of sensory issues, the kid who needs horse-therapy (administered off site and billed to the school) and the kids who need a taxi cab service to and from school b/c they are too disruptive on the bus and their parents can't/won't drive them.

Because all of the money that's used for these services, we haven't added a program for non-special students (gifted or not) in years and two years ago we slashed several excellent teachers who haven't been replaced.

I wouldn't mind having some of these "my child is gifted" parents instead of "I can't parent my child so let the schools do it" type of parents.
I'm betting (and hoping) this is a gross exaggeration. My experience has been the exact opposite. I know only 1 child with a para, and only for part of the day (he quite obviously needs extra help); and I read about kids every day, all over the country who can't get an eval let alone any kind of special service from their school district.
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Old 01-26-2012, 03:00 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,034,820 times
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Oof, there's a lot of anti-gifted stuff out there.

You know that little boy in Parenthood, Steve Martin's kid, who amuses himself by spinning in circles until he falls down? The one who put a bucket on his head and runs into stuff? That's my boy.

I think it's pretty normal for parents to say proud things about their children. Can some of them be overbearing and tactless? Sure. It's also pretty normal for parents to worry about their children, and sometimes one of the ways that manifests is to envy other kids and put them down.
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Old 01-26-2012, 03:00 PM
 
15,777 posts, read 13,210,633 times
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I teach at a public science magnet, meaning we take the top 1-10% of students in each district in our state (assuming they all want to come to our school). Therefore out of our 75 or so freshman who enter, most are above average, some are average, and maybe 7 or 8 are truly gifted.

Many of our parents like to beat their chests and brag about their "gifted" students. I even overheard one parent telling another their kid was the top ranked sophomore which is a joke as we do not rank our students at all.

Eh, after teaching some very gifted kids for the last 7 years, I will bet on the success of a kid with a great work ethic over someone with 15 more IQ points anyday of the week.
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Old 01-26-2012, 03:05 PM
 
15,205 posts, read 16,080,075 times
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My daughter has been in a GT magnet program since first grade and while there are a couple of kids in the program who do appear to be truly "gifted," the majority are the offspring of educated, upper- income parents who value education and spend lots of time with their kids. I think most of the parents recognize that that's the reason their kids are in the program and only one parent comes to mind who is obnoxious about her kids. And she is truly annoying.

I was glad that my daughter got into the program because she was reading in kindergarten (again--not because she was particularly gifted, but because we'd read to her since she was an infant) and some of the kids in her class didn't know the alphabet. She zoomed through the sight words and the teacher was having her test the other kids on their words. She loved it, but I was happy for her to get to move to the other school where she was able to advance when she was ready. The basic curriculum was the same, but in the GT program they would do the regular course work in 4 days and do enrichment activities 1 day a week.

Bragging about one's kids to others is almost always aggravating to the listener, but that doesn't mean that there isn't a place for GT curriculum in a school district.

What I think is sad is that if the main difference is parental involvement, it's a shame that all kids can't start school with the reading and math skills that the so-called GT kids have. It's really just the result of parents reading to their kids and spending lots of time looking at and talking about the world and engaging them in activities that develop different skills.

When my daughter was in kindergarten we dropped the kids off in the cafeteria in the morning and I would sit with the kids til the teacher came to pick them up. Sometimes I would help them with their sight words or read stories with them. Somehow the subject of having books at home came up and one little girl--very bright, very cute, but who struggled with the sight words--said something about not having any books at home and that no one ever read to her. Later I noticed that her mother, who probably had her as a teenager, had the little girl's name tattooed on her neck. I thought to myself, in an admittedly tacky and condescending way, that some parents show their love by having their kids' names tattooed on their necks and some show their love by reading to them. My point is just that as the OP pointed out, there are few truly gifted kids, but most kids can do well academically if adults in their lives value education and provide opportunities for them to learn.
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