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Old 01-31-2012, 12:26 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,102,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientist Mom View Post
I have found this to be not true. The school-age summer program at our (reasonably priced) daycare is more expensive than their year-round infant or toddler care. Granted, they bus the school-age kids to a park once a week and on some other kind of field trip once a week but they really need this because their outdoor facilties are not well-suited for older kids. And THIS IS THE CHEAPEST OPTION for summer care for my school-age child. Most of the summer I am paying more to send her to higher quality camps.

AND the cost will only go down during the school year if the child attends public school. When DD started K in Catholic school with aftercare our monthly cost pretty much stayed the same during the school year, but definitely more expensive in the summer.
Oh wow. I guess it definitely varies by area. My experience was just like what num1baby says above. The outing rate was a bit more ($10 or so), and I think there were additional registration fees. But all in all, our biggest expense by far was when we had two in full-day daycare. The girls are only 19 months apart, so the elder was still in diapers when her sister had to go to daycare too. I think we topped out at some point around $1300 a month. Summers were not so bad. They don't need as many teachers when they are bigger, so costs generally went down where we lived.
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Old 01-31-2012, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,971,529 times
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I have one child in kindergarten and one in daycare. (We both work) During intersession breaks and in the summer (she is in a year-round school), we use camps. The camps vary in cost from about $125 per week to $300 per week, based on what kind of things they do all day. The basic school gym camp is the cheapest, also the YMCA camp and the county parks and rec camp are on the cheaper side. The specialized camps, ie sports, horseback riding, adventure, theatre, etc type camps, are on the more expensive side. For comparison, we pay $230 per week for my 2 year old's daycare. When school is in session, my older daughter goes to the school's aftercare program, which costs $42 per week.
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Old 01-31-2012, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Swisshelm Park, Pittsburgh, PA
356 posts, read 758,603 times
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Definitely must vary by area.

As I said, the daycare camp is one of the cheaper options here and it is $40/day with a 3 day minimum. So that makes $200 per week while they are charging me $500/ month for my preschooler. I think he was $600/month when he was 1. We did look into the YMCA day camp and that was around ~$175 per week but we were not impressed with the program and heard very mixed reviews from other parents. Most of the other camps range from $250-$360 a week once you add before/aftercare to cover the whole workday.

During the school year, our aftercare (at the school) is dirt cheap ($100/ month) and tuition is ~$400/ month. so we go from paying $500 per month for DD during the school year to paying ~$1000-$1200/ month during the summer. I have no idea if we will be able to afford it in summer 2013, when DS completes K.
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Old 01-31-2012, 06:25 PM
 
Location: You know... That place
1,899 posts, read 2,358,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientist Mom View Post
Definitely must vary by area.

As I said, the daycare camp is one of the cheaper options here and it is $40/day with a 3 day minimum. So that makes $200 per week while they are charging me $500/ month for my preschooler. I think he was $600/month when he was 1. We did look into the YMCA day camp and that was around ~$175 per week but we were not impressed with the program and heard very mixed reviews from other parents. Most of the other camps range from $250-$360 a week once you add before/aftercare to cover the whole workday.

During the school year, our aftercare (at the school) is dirt cheap ($100/ month) and tuition is ~$400/ month. so we go from paying $500 per month for DD during the school year to paying ~$1000-$1200/ month during the summer. I have no idea if we will be able to afford it in summer 2013, when DS completes K.
It might not hurt to look around at other day cares in your area and see what they offer. I know that some around here don't offer school drop-off and pick-ups, but many do. We didn't go with the after school care at the school because they were more limited with summer options and options for winter and spring breaks.
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Old 01-31-2012, 08:54 PM
 
8,240 posts, read 14,930,275 times
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Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Sure when you take it out of context it sounds like it is derailing a conversation but it is 100% relevant to this conversation whether you like it or not. I know many people that are working to pay daycare costs and when they sit down and figure it out, they are not netting out very much money and actually end up BETTER off if one person stays home. It is something they should examine in their finances--taxes, insurance, commuting costs, daycare expenses, etc. If you are netting out $1000/month, you can earn more than that working part-time retail or waitressing in the evenings and weekends and have flexibility in your schedule to deal with the kids and whatever comes up. We had some friends that were actually LOSING money each month with the wife working but until they put it on paper, they didn't realize that.

Without one parent with some job flexibility, it can't work so they need to look at other options. Sure, having other mom's help out in a pinch is great but would you really ask your neighbor to watch your child every time they are sick, I think not.
I didn't take it out of context, the comment itself was out of context. I have no issue with arguing the 'right' decision....but this thread isn't about that. It's about someone who has already chosen what they're planning to do (work) and are trying to figure out how to make it work.
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:49 AM
 
606 posts, read 766,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blakeas View Post
My question is - How do other people do it in terms of when your child goes to kindergarden and has the summers off? Do other people just use camps for all summer? We both have full time jobs with no flexibility except we both get 2 weeks vacation.
I worked from home until my daughter was 4 1/2, so we didn't have to deal with that problem until the summer before Pre-K. The summers she was 4 and 5 were the most meager in terms of options because a lot of the full-day programs here require that kids be six or older.

We ended up with a wonderful situation for chunks of both of those summers, and you might be able to arrange something like that if you start looking now: we had a full-time sitter who was just tremendous. She moved away two years ago and my daughter still talks about her very fondly. We got a recommendation from the director of her old preschool; we've also had good luck in the past getting recommendations from a nearby university that sometimes has students work in their daycare. The big pro is that our sitter could adapt to the kiddo's energy level. Some days they'd spend all day at the playground or do a scavenger hunt around the neighborhood; some days they'd stay in reading or doing crafts most of the day.

Two pieces of advice on camps: 1.) We found that our daughter much prefers camps that last for more than a week at a time. It takes a few days for kids to feel really comfortable in a new group dynamic, and it's hard when that cycle resets every Monday. 2.) Camps vary really dramatically in how well-organized they are, how much effort they put into making sure the kids get to know each other and feel comfortable, and in how much the kids enjoy them. It's tough to gauge that from their publicity materials, but ask around; friends with kids a little older than yours will be more than happy to give you the scuttlebutt.
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