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Old 02-12-2012, 09:05 PM
 
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I'm not disputing this happens, but my daughter's in preschool and they go on a morning walk around the neighborhood, then outside in the play yard for an hour, unless it's pouring rain, and if it is they go up to the auditorium and ride scooters. They also dance on a regular basis.

I agree that not letting them outside is awful. I don't see anyone parents at our school requesting that the kids stay inside and read, though. That's a first. Oh, and we're in a big city hood.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaMc46 View Post
Of course, recess is only 20 minutes, but at least it gets them moving. They also go outdoors a lot during phys ed. In the winter months they'll often cross-country ski or snowshoe along trails behind the school.
How much recess did you get in elementary school? We had a morning recess, lunch (which we walked home for, ate, then ran back to school so we could play tether ball for 15 minutes before we had to go inside again), another afternoon recess AND either morning or afternoon phys ed for 40 minutes when the teacher took the entire class outside for an organized game of soccer, or basketball or dodge ball.

Yes. The school let us play dodge ball. And we used a hard-as-a-rock kick ball. The teacher kept score. 1960's. Nobody was worried about a kid getting a welt because they weren't fast enough and the ball smacked 'em in the shin. True. Dark Ages. We had a GREAT time.

I think the point the author is making is all of that has been DRASTICALLY reduced and it's one of reasons so many kids are over-weight and out-of-shape. I agree with her.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Location: BK All Day
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I was never allowed outside for gym until high school! I hated gym and the teacher hated me. She would make us run laps for the whole 60 minute class. Her motto was "if you can talk and run you are doing something wrong" and if you stopped running you had to do jumping jacks until you were ready to run. I used to dread gym class.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
How much recess did you get in elementary school? We had a morning recess, lunch (which we walked home for, ate, then ran back to school so we could play tether ball for 15 minutes before we had to go inside again), another afternoon recess AND either morning or afternoon phys ed for 40 minutes when the teacher took the entire class outside for an organized game of soccer, or basketball or dodge ball.

Yes. The school let us play dodge ball. And we used a hard-as-a-rock kick ball. The teacher kept score. 1960's. Nobody was worried about a kid getting a welt because they weren't fast enough and the ball smacked 'em in the shin. True. Dark Ages. We had a GREAT time.

I think the point the author is making is all of that has been DRASTICALLY reduced and it's one of reasons so many kids are over-weight and out-of-shape. I agree with her.
I wonder how much our litigious society has to do with this? Not to mention that Johnny's going to emergency room for a broken arm could bankrupt mom and dad. It's a shame.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:34 PM
 
Location: here
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
I have no idea where the statistics in that article came from. I worked in daycares in Illinois and kids played outside every day except when weather did not permit it (the rule was if the temp was below 20 degrees, we could not take them out). In the centers I worked in on days when we could not go out, kids went to a gym area inside as well.

In the YMCA daycare, kids had gym twice a week, swimming twice a week and outdoor play as well.
This is what I was thinking too. My kids have been in some form of preschool or day care for most of their lives, and they all had ample outdoor time. The all day kindergartners at our elem school have 3 recesses/day unless it is below 23 degrees.

If we're talking about parents not getting the kids out, that has also not been my experience. The moms in my circle all recognize the need to get the kids outside to play. It makes the day better for everyone. In the winter we go to open gym time at the rec center.

ETA re PE, when I was in elem school our regular teacher took us outside and attempted to have us play some kind of game pretty much every day. Now my kids' school has a dedicated PE teacher who knows what she's doing, but on the down side, the kids only get PE one week out of the month, rotating with art, tech, and music.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
How much recess did you get in elementary school?
I went to a city school and we didn't have recess. We had an hour for lunch and after eating we'd go outside unsupervised on the playground. Some kids ran around. Others would just hang out. The teachers didn't seem to care either way.

Phys ed was a nightmare for those of us who weren't good athletes. The two best athletes were allowed to pick teams and nothing was worse than being picked last. Then it was 40 minutes of dodge ball or kickball where the slow kids and the fat kids were living targets. The memory makes me shudder.

My kids definitely have healthier recess/phy ed programs than I did. Their schools seem to be focused on building each child's individual strengths and promoting lifelong exercise rather than rewarding kids who are naturally athletic. The gym teacher even offers an optional extra-help class before school for the less athletic kids where they do fun activities to improve their strength, speed and coordination.
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Old 02-12-2012, 10:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
I don't see anyone parents at our school requesting that the kids stay inside and read, though. That's a first. Oh, and we're in a big city hood.
I didn't see or hear about such direct requests either.
However, there is lots of indirect pressure all around.
My daughter's teacher (she is in a 3yo-s class) told me how other parents have been asking them when they will start letters, writing their names, etc. Parents are clearly anxious about academics and want to make sure their child will be ahead.
During the Holiday show, the school had some pre-K children read out loud from a script and at the end of the show the teachers emphasized how the school is so proud that they already have readers.

Do you think these indirect pressures do not change what the schools choose or not choose to do with the children?

It is not just the parents and it is not just the schools. It is both and it so much more. It is a vicious cycle resulted from the increased competitiveness of a world full of anxiety about scarce resources.
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Old 02-12-2012, 11:11 PM
 
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Let's dissect this a little differently.

A typical preschoolers day in the child care center where I worked for 11 years the schedule went something like this:

6:30-8:30 AM - children and teachers arriving in main room, breakfast cooked and served, instructions passed from parent to teachers and from management to teachers and children taken to classrooms upon arrival of their teacher.

8:30-8:45 - Personal belongings put away, bathroom needs met, transition into morning group
8:45-9:00 - Attendance, group lesson of the day, calendar, weather etc
9:00-9:45 - Center based play where lessons are supported in varying ways, snack time included.
9:45-10:00 - Bathroom needs met
10:00-11:00 - Outside time
11:00-11:15 - Bathroom needs met, wash hands for lunch
11:15-12:00 - Lunch
12:00-12:30 - Clean up from lunch, bathroom needs met, get ready for nap/rest time
12:30-2:30 - Nap/rest time
2:30-3:00 - Put away nap things, shoes back on, bathroom needs met,
3:00-4:00 - Outside time
4:00-4:15 - Bathroom needs met
4:15-5:00 - Child led play time, including afternoon snack
5:00-5:30 - Music/movement time
5:30-6:30 - Classes combining as children leave along with staff.

During the 8:30-5:30 time frame where the kids are actually in their classes .....that works out to

540 minutes total:

120 minutes outside time
+30 minutes 'vigorous activity' indoors
=150 minutes total - almost 28% (far more than 2-3%)

120 minutes rest/nap time - just over 22% (1 hour is required by state, however a 2 hour rest time allows those that take longer to fall asleep to get adequate rest as well)

120 minutes personal needs being taken care of - toileting, hand washing etc. - just over 22% (this may seem like a very long time, but when you are dealing with 15-18 kids at once it just takes that long. It is far different than just dealing with your own 1,2,3 kids)

105 minutes for learning/center time - about 20%

45 minutes lunch around 8%

Now let's look at the kids who arrive at 6:30 AM and are not picked up until 6:30 PM. They are there 720 minutes and now their 'vigorous activity' time is cut to about 21%, which is still far greater than 2-3 %.
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Old 02-13-2012, 07:04 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
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My son is in second grade. He has recess mid-morning, another recess after lunch, and gym every day. My daughters are in junior high and high school, and they have gym every day. At the high school, the athletic director is a young guy with a enthusiastic outlook about physical exercise. Their credo there is that daily activity is not only vital to physical health, it's also beneficial to the learning process. There are studies indicating that learning is more effective after physical activity, and the school will go so far as to rearrange a kid's schedule so that he or she takes a troublesome class right after P.E.

I don't know why some schools can manage it and others are so overbooked, but I'm glad we live where we do.
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Old 02-13-2012, 07:28 AM
 
Location: here
24,477 posts, read 28,782,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
I didn't see or hear about such direct requests either.
However, there is lots of indirect pressure all around.
My daughter's teacher (she is in a 3yo-s class) told me how other parents have been asking them when they will start letters, writing their names, etc. Parents are clearly anxious about academics and want to make sure their child will be ahead.
During the Holiday show, the school had some pre-K children read out loud from a script and at the end of the show the teachers emphasized how the school is so proud that they already have readers.

Do you think these indirect pressures do not change what the schools choose or not choose to do with the children?

It is not just the parents and it is not just the schools. It is both and it so much more. It is a vicious cycle resulted from the increased competitiveness of a world full of anxiety about scarce resources.
that doesn't mean the parents want them inside learning instead of outside playing. It just means these parents are paying for preschool and want their kids to learn something while they're there.
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