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Old 02-24-2012, 09:26 AM
Status: "Ka Pow Za!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: hunt valley
5,546 posts, read 2,285,136 times
Reputation: 2663
Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
Speaking of raising children with a sense of importance.

Assuming your children are indeed very intelligent, so intelligent they are clearly smarter than 50% of the adults out there (waow) - and you still wouldn't have to leave them with the impression that they are smarter than those adults.
Let alone that this is 99.9999% likely NOT TRUE.
Most of the time adults are not too bright either
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Old 02-24-2012, 09:29 AM
Status: "Ka Pow Za!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: hunt valley
5,546 posts, read 2,285,136 times
Reputation: 2663
Quote:
Originally Posted by springfieldva View Post
Lol. So true. I had a few jobs waiting tables at a variety of different restaurants.

My main complaint with kids was that they could be messy eaters and some of the parents didn't even try to control where food was being thrown/smeared/spilled. It always took a while for their tables to be cleaned and bussed which meant a delay in my next party being seated, which meant less tips for me...

But the truly obnoxious, loud, rude, whooping, hollering ones weren't the kids.
Yeah the messy part can be irritating i agree. But the most issues i have to deal with kids is being loud. I also don't have to contend with little boys unlike their adult counterparts attempting to grab/smack my ass,make rude comments,ask me what a pretty girl like me needs to be working for etc etc etc.
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Old 02-24-2012, 09:43 AM
 
2,308 posts, read 2,212,762 times
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I love the idea of child free restaurants, B&B's, resorts, etc. It's nice to have a few places that are only for adults. I am pleasantly surprised to see so many parents who agree. It's not that I don't like children (I have none presently), but sometimes you want a quiet dinner or a quiet, romantic weekend. I don't know about other people, but screaming or jumping or running or spitting up kids sort-of kill my romance.

I wanted to just say a quick thing about another topic discussed here. Recently, I have become friends with a couple of Korean ladies. They spend a lot of time asking me questions about American culture, and I ask them a lot of questions about Korean culture and Asian culture in general. From an Easterner's perspective (in general), American children are rowdier and more rambunctious than kids from other cultures. My Korean friends were horrified to hear children at the bus stop and the schools yell at their parents or talk back. This was not done in their experiences in Korea or any Asian country they visited. It is my experience also that my generation (the late 20s-30s crowd) gives their children more "freedom of expression", as some say. In my opinion, it's a lack of control over their children. I see my friends striving to be friends with their kids instead of being parents. I think that's a bad thing. That's just my opinion though.
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Old 02-24-2012, 09:52 AM
 
323 posts, read 249,908 times
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This is sad that it is coming up again but can you blame a child under the age 6 melting down sitting there having nothing to do. Come On Parents play games with them or do something is usually the problem. The children are not the problem it is the parents that bring their children there. Get a babysitter if you are going to spend $30.00 a plate for food let the child enjoy a night also without you. The child does not want to sit there with nothing do. Problem is the parent not using their common sense.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:04 AM
 
Location: The #1 sunshine state, Arizona.
10,745 posts, read 8,856,902 times
Reputation: 58894
Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtisG View Post
It has to do with some factors. Is it a restaurant geared towards kids? Mcdonalds. taco bell... ect. you can't go in there and complain about kids.
How about a buffet restaurant. Kids need to be acommpanied to the food area. A level of respect is to be given to the people after you. Kids handling the food in this area can get sloppy. however I'm told people who work in kitchens won't eat out cause they"know what happens" in the kitchen behind closed doors.
Fine dinning should have kids behave like a young adult should and if out of control be asked to leave.
It doesn't matter whether it's restaurant, retail store or church, parents need to manage their children in public. If your child is upset, don't force strangers to suffer through it. Promptly remove your child from the situation and deal with the issue. It's a matter of common courtesy that people seem to be lacking these days. No need to blame the child.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:15 AM
 
3,485 posts, read 2,780,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidkitty View Post
Most of the time adults are not too bright either
The vast majority of adults are mediocre. Just like children.
Heard of the "bell curve"?

What makes you believe that most adults are not "too bright" (true) yet children are somehow brighter than most of those mediocre adults. Or are you just talking about your own very special bright child?

Do you really think the state of "childhood" is this magic IQ improver in and of itself? Because this is what it sounds like when parents imply that they'd rather pay attention to their awesome, special child (oh the innocent, deep wisdom) than to half of those adult dim-wits out there?

Most adults are mediocre.
Most children are mediocre.
Comparing the child and adult populations (not specific individuals) is ridiculous in and of itself.

Then why is this even discussed here?
"My child is so smart I'd rather hear him talk than all those half-wit adults out there".

Then we wonder why we are raising the most Narcissistic generation in history.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:24 AM
 
3,485 posts, read 2,780,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
"more interesting than" does not mean "smarter than"
Could it be that you find more interesting what the child does/says instead of what an adult has to say because you see the child as an extention of yourself? Oh, the inherent "interesting"-ness of mini-me-s!

This is exactly one of the fundamental differences between today's generation of parents and those of yesterday:
parents found quite interesting what other adults had to say (it was called having an actual marriage and a social life which children were invited to step away from) and much less interested in what their children had to say.
They were more likely to expect the child to pay attention to THEM (and other important adults in their life, aka the teachers) than for THEM to pay attention to the child.

This has changed today. We al have "mini-me"-s and what they say/do/prefer/breathe at every step of the way it is way more important than what any adult has to say. Unless, of course, they make a comment about our little darling, which they usually don't because they are way too busy making comments about their OWN little darlings.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:41 AM
 
Location: In Line For The E Ticket Ride
20,516 posts, read 10,908,951 times
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Actually, I've known children who are in the top percentiles of intelligence. VASTLY smarter than the average adult.

Without being taught manners and how to behave in public they can be just as rude and annoying as anyone else.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
11,848 posts, read 10,275,834 times
Reputation: 12949
I love the idea, nothing more i hate is going out to dinner after a whole days work and have to hear some one elses child, talking, singing, screaming or watever...now it isnt the childs fault, they do not know...it is the parents fault because they are idiots not to know that their child is freaking annoying.



OK, but the trick is to go to a better, more upscale restaurant, most sensible parents do not bring their kids, and the poor people cannot afford it.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
11,852 posts, read 5,236,957 times
Reputation: 11000
Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
Could it be that you find more interesting what the child does/says instead of what an adult has to say because you see the child as an extention of yourself? Oh, the inherent "interesting"-ness of mini-me-s!

This is exactly one of the fundamental differences between today's generation of parents and those of yesterday:
parents found quite interesting what other adults had to say (it was called having an actual marriage and a social life which children were invited to step away from) and much less interested in what their children had to say.
They were more likely to expect the child to pay attention to THEM (and other important adults in their life, aka the teachers) than for THEM to pay attention to the child.

This has changed today. We al have "mini-me"-s and what they say/do/prefer/breathe at every step of the way it is way more important than what any adult has to say. Unless, of course, they make a comment about our little darling, which they usually don't because they are way too busy making comments about their OWN little darlings.
Hmm, I enjoy social interactions with my children such as dining out, and my children understand appropriate restaurant behavior. I also enjoy socializing with my husband, and with friends. Balance is good and healthy. I am also an older parent who was raised in a very strict "children must be seen and not heard" environment, which I find to be emotionally bankrupt, and would never follow that path with my family. I was not raised here either. Generalizing is tricky when it fails.
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