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Old 03-17-2012, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
4,189 posts, read 6,831,415 times
Reputation: 2842
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoppySead View Post
That's no laughing matter. My husbands friend is a carpenter, makes a great living and built his own home, wow, it's amazing, paid off and he is a happy guy. All of my husbands friends are in trades of some kind, they are all pretty well off and like working with their hands. My husband wouldn't work well at a desk all day. Construction companies, plumbing companies, cabinet shops, parts companies are all the second step of most in the trade area. They don't do bad at all, have less dept starting out and seem pretty content in my neck of the woods.
It really depends on the personality of the child. You've got an energetic kid who likes to work with his hands then they could do pretty well if they decide to go into a trade, work it for 5 years and then start up a company. Takes about as long as the degree except most are making money during the process, not spending it. If they save for 5 years, work hard, they have a nice start up fund for the biz.
A lot of my friends and clients are in the trades, and my father was also in the trades. A lot of them are extremely successful, very intelligent and have done very, very well for themselves.

It takes a good work ethic and a knack for the skill. The good ethic we (as parents) can instill. The knack or skill is often God given. I would not feel one bit disappointed if my kids were carpenters or skilled workers. I would feel very, very proud as long as they do they best job they are capable of doing.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:48 AM
 
167 posts, read 182,193 times
Reputation: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
"Would you encourage, or just expect your child to go to college ? "

We expected AND encouraged our kids to go to college.
Exactly what I thought as soon as I read the title. I don't care if my son wants to be a garbage truck driver or if he wants to follow his parents and join the military but he will have a degree first. Trade school's I look at as college as well. We are very fortunate in that recently a set of well off grandparents have offered to put a considerable amount of money into the kid's college fund.

I know that many people succeed without one and if my kids can manage that themselves so be it. Until they reach that point though I will continue to teach them to work hard to get scholarships instead of giving them delusions of grandeur that they will be the next Facebook creator without a degree. I guess a good thing for them to see is how I struggle finding a job without a degree having been a SAHM for 9 years now.
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Old 03-19-2012, 10:21 AM
Status: "Vacation!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: The Millennial Republic of Arlington, Virginia
14,507 posts, read 16,217,384 times
Reputation: 14559
I was necessarily expected to go to college by my mother but expected to do something after high school that would give me the opportunity to advance. My mother is retired USAF so she encouraged th path if I wasn't going to do college. Her bottom line is you ain't about to be around here working 20 hours a week at a McJob and doing nothing else. I decided on college and graduate in May but I wonder what would have happened if I decided to do the military instead.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:29 AM
 
2,658 posts, read 2,662,882 times
Reputation: 1432
I don't mean to offend anyone in the thread, but some of the posts make me shake my head as people talk about their advanced degrees yet exhibit very poor writing/grammatical skills...
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Old 03-19-2012, 06:48 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 672,419 times
Reputation: 917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
I'm not ignoring it. I'm just sharing my personal experience. My parents paid for college for my sister and I. I hope to do the same for my kids. I will admit that with the economy the way it is, we might not be able to fully cover college for 2. I think trade school is a fine option, but I hope mine will want to go to college, and I will encourage them to.
Not everyone is so fortunate to have parents who can shell out thousands of dollars each year for college.
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Old 03-19-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Location: here
16,651 posts, read 12,980,578 times
Reputation: 13310
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiltheEndofTime View Post
Not everyone is so fortunate to have parents who can shell out thousands of dollars each year for college.
I never said they were. We were asked if we would expect and/or encourage our kids to go to college. My answer is yes.

http://www.bargaineering.com/article...nvestment.html
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Old 03-19-2012, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,069 posts, read 1,951,574 times
Reputation: 4237
Expect it..no...encourage it...yes. I recently read somewhere that todays BA degree is equal to that of a high school diploma .... 30 years ago. Is it true...I have no clue.
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Old 03-22-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Southern Girl
591 posts, read 421,046 times
Reputation: 1551
From experience I am encouraging my 3rd child to go to college and making sure she's taking the classes needed in high school to be accepted she is a junior and wants to go and I think she would do well.
My older child high achiever got a full scholarship to college did great graduated with degree in chemical engineering 25 years olds got a job before she graduated makes more than my 53 year old husband, also college grad.
2nd child boy good grades in high school but disorganized a little immature we expected him to go to college even though he had no idea what he wanted to do. He dropped out after 1 1/2 years couldn't keep it all together, didn't attend class etc. We wasted $15,000.00. Now works full time makes minimum wage but lives on his own and seems happy.

You just never know.
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Old 04-01-2012, 02:45 PM
 
13 posts, read 6,386 times
Reputation: 19
I've already had the chat with my eldest that after high school she's got three options: straight to university, community college then university, or she can enlist and then go to college. The emphasis the entire time was that no matter what she's going to get a degree (if she wants our financial support), so she might as well just get it right off the bat.
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Old 04-01-2012, 03:05 PM
 
47,586 posts, read 32,411,840 times
Reputation: 21467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven Nation Army View Post
I've already had the chat with my eldest that after high school she's got three options: straight to university, community college then university, or she can enlist and then go to college. The emphasis the entire time was that no matter what she's going to get a degree (if she wants our financial support), so she might as well just get it right off the bat.
Yikes -- now I see this right after you wondered about a suicide note. Sometimes there is ANOTHER option.

My suggestion would be to back off the pressure, let her choose her life's vocation herself, let her know that if she doesn't go to college right now, she can always go later on.

In fact I have a couple of sisters that did things quite differently. One pressured herself to get two degrees in 4 years, then she married and chose to be a stay at home mother. When she finally looked for a job 25 years later, her two degrees meant nothing and she said "all that hard work for nothing".

The other went to college in her 30's and right into a good paying job. It is actually better to get the degree when you're going to be ready to use it. Pushing hard to get one doesn't necessarily pay off.
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