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Old 11-13-2012, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Wherever life takes me.
6,134 posts, read 6,678,708 times
Reputation: 3134

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If I hear this statement one more time, I'm going to choke myself with my name tag at work.

I know a few may actually have them but I hear this statement way too much.
Waist bands of jeans bother them, they don't like the elastic part in camis, something is too itchy, something in the shoe bothers them, therefore they have "sensory" issues.

All the information I have gathered over the years does not make these things seem like sensory issues.

A woman returned a pair of boots because something in the boot was bothering her daughter, I felt in the boot, there was a clear ridge in the boot that easily felt, it would annoy me too, her excuse was her daughter has "sensory issues".

Same issue with the cami's so many parents excuse is that their child has sensory issues and the elastic bothers their daughters. Of course the elastic bothers your prepubescent daughter, the elastic sits somewhere different than sheis used to.

And jeans, little girls aren't used to jeans, it's no sensory issue that the jean material is too tight and annoying they aren't used to them.

I guess my beef is that people over diagnose stuff, self diagnose and label their kids.

Yes I do know clothing bothers kids with sensory issues but I forget who it is here that actually has a child with sensory issues, and something about finally able to watch a movie.

But honestly I find it hard to believe that all these children who have come in have actual sensory issues and are not just picky, within the past month I have been told this more than 5 times. Are sensory issues really all that common?

Cause then I must have sensory issues too as well as most of the world.....

Any insight as to the over diagnose madness????
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Old 11-14-2012, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,484 posts, read 43,747,138 times
Reputation: 47257
That would be me and my daughter who at age 10 finally was able to see her first movie without sticking her fingers in her ears.

I don't know if kids have more "sensory Issues" now than they used to but now at least we as parents have a name we can attach to this problem. When my now 31 year old son was little I must have gone through 4 dozen different brands of socks for him. God forbid he feel the ridge across the toes. We tried tube socks, loose socks, tight socks, etc. his plaintiff cry was "I can feel my socks!" To this day if he wears socks at home he pushes them down so that only half his foot is covered cause he can "feel his socks".

Txt I know you are young, have no children and very little experience with kids (being a nanny for a few months does not count). Many years ago there were no names for problems except bad, retarded and spastic. It's true that ADHD, autism, RAD and other terms are now applied to kids who previously would have had those unfortunate labels. If a kid was not coordinated, fell a bunch, was afraid of a ball coming at them, etc they were put in Spastic PE. No I guess the school didn't call it that but the kids surely did.
There was no individualized learning recognized. if a kid didn't get a concept then he was slow, retarded, dumb.

I'm so glad I live in a time where all kids are not bunched into a huge group with no individual attention.

My daughter with sensory issues has a very mild case. She walks with her hands over her ears at the beach, she didn't ride a bike without training wheels until she was almost 9 years old. She still cannot flush a toilet in a public restroom without great fear. Have you noticed how loud some toilets are? She still gets motion sick in a moving vehicle. She is afraid of balls or frisbees coming at her so she can't throw or catch very well. She will not go to BD parties in loud public places like Chunk E Cheese. Crowds are out of the question. Thankfully she does not have skin sensitivity issues. There are some kids with extreme sensory problems. Read The Out of Sync Child for more info.

When you have kids you will learn that you try to accommodate your child's sensitivities without spoiling her. You won't force her to go to a movie, wear a piece of clothing which irritates her. This is what a good parent does.

you are working in retail which is one of the hardest jobs around. if moms are bringing things back for whatever reason they are asked to say why the return. It used to be fit, size, fabric preference, style, color were not right. if parents are now using a new term (to you) about Sensitivity Issues just recognize they are using the preferred term and trying to do what is best for their kid.

You better buck up hon cause you are about to hit the biggest return season of all. Just realize you too would not want to pay for something that cannot be worn or used and your customers deserve your polite and kind response and a bit of understanding.
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Old 11-14-2012, 08:44 AM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,435,121 times
Reputation: 12165
Quote:
Originally Posted by txtqueen View Post
If I hear this statement one more time, I'm going to choke myself with my name tag at work.

I know a few may actually have them but I hear this statement way too much.
Waist bands of jeans bother them, they don't like the elastic part in camis, something is too itchy, something in the shoe bothers them, therefore they have "sensory" issues.

All the information I have gathered over the years does not make these things seem like sensory issues.

A woman returned a pair of boots because something in the boot was bothering her daughter, I felt in the boot, there was a clear ridge in the boot that easily felt, it would annoy me too, her excuse was her daughter has "sensory issues".

Same issue with the cami's so many parents excuse is that their child has sensory issues and the elastic bothers their daughters. Of course the elastic bothers your prepubescent daughter, the elastic sits somewhere different than sheis used to.

And jeans, little girls aren't used to jeans, it's no sensory issue that the jean material is too tight and annoying they aren't used to them.

I guess my beef is that people over diagnose stuff, self diagnose and label their kids.

Yes I do know clothing bothers kids with sensory issues but I forget who it is here that actually has a child with sensory issues, and something about finally able to watch a movie.

But honestly I find it hard to believe that all these children who have come in have actual sensory issues and are not just picky, within the past month I have been told this more than 5 times. Are sensory issues really all that common?

Cause then I must have sensory issues too as well as most of the world.....

Any insight as to the over diagnose madness????
Many people (not just kids) don't like certain fabrics, strong smells, find loud noises disturbing, are bothered by blinking lights, etc. They don't need a medical diagnosis to know these things. Sensory issues covers any sort of response to the senses.

What difference does it make if you call it sensory issues or pickiness? I wouldn't make my kids wear clothes that itchy or bother them regardless of what you call the problem. I also wouldn't force them to see a movie if loud noises bother them. Whether you call it sensory issues or just say they don't like loud noises I still can't see why you would force those things on a child.
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Old 11-14-2012, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
43,197 posts, read 41,793,678 times
Reputation: 82972
I'm guessing txt is concerned more with the question of whether these complaints are true "diagnosable" issues, or are they a sign of our society's becoming less disciplined, more enabling?

My dad is convinced it is. He constantly talks about "all these kids with food allergies," and how no one had food allergies when he was growing up (1950s/1960s). He thinks it's just a lot of people who want an excuse to "be special and have things their way." To him, everybody now has autism/Asperger's, ADHD, allergies and a learning disability.

My SIL can be this way, with hypochondriacal tendencies and hypersensitivity when it comes to her daughter. As a toddler, she told the family their daughter had cystic fibrosis, then they found out she was just still learning to walk well. Then at 4 she developed a dairy allergy that no longer exists at 7.

I know there are true allergies and sensory processing issues, and I KNOW no one would choose to live that way or "have it their way." One of my sons has some of these sensory problems. But the prevalence of certain syndromes today, and people who jump on a bandwagon for attention, can raise suspicions in some people, like txtqueen.
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Old 11-14-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,160 posts, read 20,451,301 times
Reputation: 26438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
Then at 4 she developed a dairy allergy that no longer exists at 7.
You can grow out of an allergy. At 5, my daughter had a severe allergy and we had to carry epi-pens. Four years later, she no longer has allergic reactions to the same thing and we don't need the epi-pens.

My other daughter was lactose-intolerant as an infant and had to have soy formula. She can now drink milk without any problems.
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Old 11-14-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,160 posts, read 20,451,301 times
Reputation: 26438
Quote:
Originally Posted by txtqueen View Post
If I hear this statement one more time, I'm going to choke myself with my name tag at work.

I know a few may actually have them but I hear this statement way too much.
Waist bands of jeans bother them, they don't like the elastic part in camis, something is too itchy, something in the shoe bothers them, therefore they have "sensory" issues.

All the information I have gathered over the years does not make these things seem like sensory issues.

A woman returned a pair of boots because something in the boot was bothering her daughter, I felt in the boot, there was a clear ridge in the boot that easily felt, it would annoy me too, her excuse was her daughter has "sensory issues".

Same issue with the cami's so many parents excuse is that their child has sensory issues and the elastic bothers their daughters. Of course the elastic bothers your prepubescent daughter, the elastic sits somewhere different than sheis used to.

And jeans, little girls aren't used to jeans, it's no sensory issue that the jean material is too tight and annoying they aren't used to them.

I guess my beef is that people over diagnose stuff, self diagnose and label their kids.

Yes I do know clothing bothers kids with sensory issues but I forget who it is here that actually has a child with sensory issues, and something about finally able to watch a movie.

But honestly I find it hard to believe that all these children who have come in have actual sensory issues and are not just picky, within the past month I have been told this more than 5 times. Are sensory issues really all that common?

Cause then I must have sensory issues too as well as most of the world.....

Any insight as to the over diagnose madness????
Maybe some stores have refused to take returns because the garments were irritating to the child, and so the parents hope that by saying it's a medical condition, you will be more likely to allow them to return it. I rarely shop at Target because they are so difficult about returns...not even talking about returning something because it's uncomfortable to my child, but the other day I bought a string of Halloween lights and it didn't work and when I went to take it back, the customer service girl was being unbelievably difficult about it.

I think the current economy makes people more likely to want to return something than they used to be. It used to be, if something didn't fit right or your kid just didn't like it, or it gave them wedgies or they could feel a bump in the shoe, you stuck that item in the donate bag, or the hand-me-down bag and gave it away to someone. Now people feel like they have less money, that makes them want the items they buy to give good value for their money, and they want to return it if it isn't comfortable.

I'm glad I don't work retail anymore. It was frustrating enough 15 years ago, I can't even imagine doing it now.
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Old 11-14-2012, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,586 posts, read 24,997,443 times
Reputation: 20847
funny how when you are a child you have these issues with sensory and clothing feels, but they stay even as an adult.
As a child i hated my socks to slouch down, i still feel that way, cannot stand loose socks on my feet, and i have grown boys too.

I also hated wearing anything new that was not washed. My mother liked newness ????, I felt it was uncomfortable.
So now anything I buy i take the tags off and put it in the hamper. LOL


some things never change.
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Old 11-14-2012, 02:42 PM
 
12,887 posts, read 15,424,246 times
Reputation: 14853
I have`"sensory issues"...just a new, more fancier way of saying somethings bothering me.
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Old 11-14-2012, 02:53 PM
 
32,532 posts, read 30,646,320 times
Reputation: 32347
Maybe the customers just don't want to give an in-depth explanation of why their child can't wear the item to the stranger (that would be you) behind the counter.

"Why are you returning this?"
"My child has sensory issues and she can't wear it." Easy peasy. And it's a reason, not an excuse.

If I returned something and the salesperson started asking me for a detailed explanation of why, I'd quit shopping there. (Especially if the clerk had a look on her face that said she was about to choke on her name tag because she didn't like my answer. I'd be out of there mucho pronto.)

Last edited by DewDropInn; 11-14-2012 at 03:02 PM..
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Old 11-14-2012, 02:59 PM
 
12,130 posts, read 9,875,697 times
Reputation: 15782
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
I'm guessing txt is concerned more with the question of whether these complaints are true "diagnosable" issues, or are they a sign of our society's becoming less disciplined, more enabling?

My dad is convinced it is. He constantly talks about "all these kids with food allergies," and how no one had food allergies when he was growing up (1950s/1960s). He thinks it's just a lot of people who want an excuse to "be special and have things their way." To him, everybody now has autism/Asperger's, ADHD, allergies and a learning disability.
No one likes to hear it. But the leading mask for ADHD is bad behavior due to ineffective parenting. Says so right in the beginning of the AAP book. Pediatricians themselves sure can't say it.
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