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Old 10-12-2007, 07:40 PM
 
1,094 posts, read 2,589,603 times
Reputation: 723

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Hi everyone,

I have a wonderful and energetic four year old idaughter. When she was about two and half, she became very moody and started throwing uncontrollable fits. She is not my only child, so I knew these were not your normal everyday temper tantrums. I have tried every tactic I can think of, all to no avail. Diabetes (sp?) runs in the family and we have had her checked, she does have borderline low blood sugar, but I really don't think that is the only cause. (Of course I could be wrong) She has tactile sensitivity, and sometimes something as simple as the line on her socks rubbing her toes the wrong way, can set her off. Its almost like you can see it in her eyes, she goes almost blank and sometimes just has to cry / scream / kick it out before she can stop. I realize there are times when she throws normal tantrums, but that's not what I'm talking about. And please don't tell me she's just spoiled, as stated before, she's not my only child.

I'm really worried, she is such a sweet little girl most of the time. I have tried to make sure she eats small regular meals to keep her sugar levels stable, limit sweets, caffiene, etc, but this really hasn't changed her behavior. Also, don't know if this means anything, but she drank a few sips of a mountain dew vault one time and literally within ten- fifteen minutes she was in an all out rage. Besides diabetes, there is bipolarism and depression in the family.

Could she just be a "high maintence" child? I tried to find info on "glutten sensitivity", but not really getting anywhere with that.

PLEASE HELP!
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:00 PM
ARC
 
181 posts, read 707,891 times
Reputation: 99
I'm not going to pretend to know the cause of your daugther's tantrums. However, your daughter sounds very much like mine (who is now almost 10 years old). My daughter is tactile sensitive, too (have to cut all the tags out of her shirts, is very picky about clothes because of the way they feel, etc.)

We've dealt with my daughter's tantrums and mood swings since she was about 2 years old. Lately they've gotten worse and she deliberately tries to start fights/annoy everyone, so we took her to a psychiatrist, who diagnosed her with ODD (oppositional defiant disorder). My husband has bipolar disorder and depression and anxiety disorder occur on both sides of the family. My daughter is in counseling and it is slooooowly getting better. I'm not saying your daughter has ODD, but she sounds like my daughter at that age and I just wanted to suggest another avenue to investigate.

Hope this helped. Good luck.


Quote:
Originally Posted by happeemommee View Post
Hi everyone,

I have a wonderful and energetic four year old idaughter. When she was about two and half, she became very moody and started throwing uncontrollable fits. She is not my only child, so I knew these were not your normal everyday temper tantrums. I have tried every tactic I can think of, all to no avail. Diabetes (sp?) runs in the family and we have had her checked, she does have borderline low blood sugar, but I really don't think that is the only cause. (Of course I could be wrong) She has tactile sensitivity, and sometimes something as simple as the line on her socks rubbing her toes the wrong way, can set her off. Its almost like you can see it in her eyes, she goes almost blank and sometimes just has to cry / scream / kick it out before she can stop. I realize there are times when she throws normal tantrums, but that's not what I'm talking about. And please don't tell me she's just spoiled, as stated before, she's not my only child.

I'm really worried, she is such a sweet little girl most of the time. I have tried to make sure she eats small regular meals to keep her sugar levels stable, limit sweets, caffiene, etc, but this really hasn't changed her behavior. Also, don't know if this means anything, but she drank a few sips of a mountain dew vault one time and literally within ten- fifteen minutes she was in an all out rage. Besides diabetes, there is bipolarism and depression in the family.

Could she just be a "high maintence" child? I tried to find info on "glutten sensitivity", but not really getting anywhere with that.

PLEASE HELP!
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:08 PM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,384,279 times
Reputation: 3170
Her reaction to the Mountain Dew makes me think bi-polar. Mountain Dew is a stimulant like Ritalin and stimulants/Ritalin is known to make bi-polar symptoms worse. My son had the sensitivity issues and occupational therapy really helped him in that area. You can get some at home OT ideas from the book The Out of Sync Child. So many of these issues overlap - ADHD, Sensory Integration Disorder, LDs, autism, PDD, bi-polar, Tourettes, speech issues. It's hard to weed through them all and see what's there and what isn't. Knowing family background helps since there is a hereditary component to it all. You might be able to get her into the free special ed public preschool. It's a tough road. Pace yourself.
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Old 10-13-2007, 07:45 PM
 
Location: In the sunshine on a ship with a plank
3,413 posts, read 7,835,342 times
Reputation: 2214
I would recommend talking to your pediatrician about ordering a neuropsychological evaluation on your daughter. I'm not sure if four is too young for this test but it's very intensive and will help to diagnose any developmental or psychological disorders. I will further recommend that you try to have this done at a teaching hospital- one that's tied into a University. Usually a couple of graduate students administer the test and professors will review the findings and give you a comprehensive report on any issues they can find. They will also recommend courses of treatment- be they OT/PT, counseling, social or coping skills, etc.

Four sounds so young for a BPD diagnosis but my neighbor's granddaughter was diagnosed at 5 years old.

I wish you the best- but I do think a proactive approach is your best bet.
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Old 10-13-2007, 08:34 PM
 
Location: South FL
9,444 posts, read 14,986,181 times
Reputation: 8014
Quote:
Originally Posted by happeemommee View Post
Hi everyone,

I have a wonderful and energetic four year old idaughter. When she was about two and half, she became very moody and started throwing uncontrollable fits. She is not my only child, so I knew these were not your normal everyday temper tantrums. I have tried every tactic I can think of, all to no avail. Diabetes (sp?) runs in the family and we have had her checked, she does have borderline low blood sugar, but I really don't think that is the only cause. (Of course I could be wrong) She has tactile sensitivity, and sometimes something as simple as the line on her socks rubbing her toes the wrong way, can set her off. Its almost like you can see it in her eyes, she goes almost blank and sometimes just has to cry / scream / kick it out before she can stop. I realize there are times when she throws normal tantrums, but that's not what I'm talking about. And please don't tell me she's just spoiled, as stated before, she's not my only child.

I'm really worried, she is such a sweet little girl most of the time. I have tried to make sure she eats small regular meals to keep her sugar levels stable, limit sweets, caffiene, etc, but this really hasn't changed her behavior. Also, don't know if this means anything, but she drank a few sips of a mountain dew vault one time and literally within ten- fifteen minutes she was in an all out rage. Besides diabetes, there is bipolarism and depression in the family.

Could she just be a "high maintence" child? I tried to find info on "glutten sensitivity", but not really getting anywhere with that.

PLEASE HELP!
First of all - hugs.
I am not a child psychiatrist, but sounds like normal tantrums to me. Some children have very intense tantrums, some don't.
I know you are trying to eliminate sweets, but I suggest to take her to food allergist if you haven't already. Sounds like food sensitivity. Does her diet have any artificial sweeteners or coloring? Does she get enough iron? Vitamin D?

Also, try to see if there is pattern to her tantrums - does she get enough sleep?


I mean, I'm not against taking her to child behavior specialist, but the downside is that so many children are not misdiagnosed with ADHD and bipolar disorder. I would be nervous that the doctor will insist on medications that could be unneccessary.
I would first eliminate any allergy triggers/make sure she gets enough nutrition and sleep and just generally see if there had been a change of athmospere in the house.
You might also want to read "The Explosive Child" by Dr. Greene.

If you find that nothing is helping and you can't seem to find solution, then you might want to see specialist. But just so you know, I had spoken to many moms before who have children with the most outrageous tantrums and as the time went on, they subsided.

By the way - does she only throw these tantrums with you?...or does she do it with your partner? Caregiver?
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Old 10-13-2007, 10:33 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,354 posts, read 5,627,670 times
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I would schedule an evaluation soon. Try to find a developmental pediatrician. Write the list of things she does that are concerning to you and bring that to the appt.

My child has tactile issues, she is also autistic. She also cannot stand the sewn line in socks and has very similiar meltdowns. She now wears her socks inside out so the seam won't bother her. She also has to carefully position the seam line before her shoes go on.

Is your child struggling in any other areas like speech delays, motor skills, anything to suggest developmental delays?
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Old 10-15-2007, 10:46 AM
 
Location: The Raider Nation._ Our band kicks brass
1,854 posts, read 8,524,033 times
Reputation: 2302
I think Max's mama may be onto something. When my daughter was that age, she also had unexplainable tantrums. We finally figured out it was an allergy to red and yellow food dyes. It also explained why I would have strange cravings for orange cheese puffs, Kraft Dinners, and red pop. She got the allergy from me, and we sometimes crave what we are allergic to. I guess it's the way a junkie craves crack.

We both watch what we eat, and she is now a straight A student on a college scholarship. There's hope.
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Old 10-15-2007, 01:32 PM
 
1,094 posts, read 2,589,603 times
Reputation: 723
My instinct was telling me food sensitivity, but I'm not sure if it's wishful thinking or denial. She is fine developmentally and advanced in some areas. I've tried to pay attention to her reaction to certain foods, lack of sleep, my stress level etc. And of course, less sleep = more tantrums and also my stress level directly affects hers. I have a large family ( 4 other daughters and two grandkids, plus hubby and son in law all in same house) she seems to have these fits more for me and hubby, but does have them for my daughters, too, just not as much. I've talked to her about it and she said "she feels itchy inside". Also, if anyone yells at her she really loses it. I've tried to explain to hubby and son in law, that yelling makes it worse but they just think she should listen and control herself no matter what.

I will find that book and will also get her an appointment. I want to cover all my bases!

Thanks again everyone and please keep it coming.
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Austin TX
1,209 posts, read 5,671,395 times
Reputation: 412
I feel your pain. The tantrums you describe are not typical preschooler tantrums. I've been there! My son had the exact type of tantruming you describe from about age 18 months to about 2.5 years old. He could tantrum from 5 to 8 times a day and each tantrum would last up to an hour. We couldn't touch him, hug him, deal with him in any way. Nothing worked. We got him evaluated and he had a severe speech impairment and sensory issues. Is your daughter seeing an OT for her tactile problems? Has she been fully assessed for any other sensory issues (vestibular, proprioceptive, etc.)

Once we were able to figure out how to address my son's sensory seeking behavior, and get him what he needed from a stimuli standpoint, his tantrums went away very, very quickly. I think you've gotten great advice on this thread and would definitely encourage you to pursue more thorough assessments, pursue the food sensitivity question and to def. read the Out of Sync Child. Best of luck to you and don't let people tell you you have a high maintenance, problem or spoiled child. They've likely not ever walked in your shoes. Once you figure out the cause I'll bet you'll be able to snap her out of them pretty quick. It may be a long process of trial and error, but you'll get there. Good luck!
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