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View Poll Results: Based on the situation below, do you feel the parents are:
Morons because they couldn't find the kid. 10 18.87%
Correct for calling the police, because it's an understandable situation. 43 81.13%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-07-2014, 10:10 AM
 
9,056 posts, read 6,722,316 times
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Here's a classic case of damned if you do and damned if you don't.

Parents take the risk of being ridiculed on the national stage if they get anyone outside the home (hell maybe even in it) involved in anything. For gods sake they couldn't find their child, they did the right thing - the main thing is that he's found safe. Who are we to judge their decision?

Calling them moronic is, well... moronic.

 
Old 08-07-2014, 10:29 AM
 
2,321 posts, read 2,360,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Here's a classic case of damned if you do and damned if you don't.

Parents take the risk of being ridiculed on the national stage if they get anyone outside the home (hell maybe even in it) involved in anything. For gods sake they couldn't find their child, they did the right thing - the main thing is that he's found safe. Who are we to judge their decision?

Calling them moronic is, well... moronic.
I'd say the first time this happens and they call the police is excusable. Now the parents need to create a plan to be able to find their own kid in their own house if this happens again. Perhaps putting some kind of bracelet on him that will beep via a remote control or something like that.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 10:36 AM
 
579 posts, read 717,030 times
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When my kids were younger I "lost" them four times on our property. One time, one was hiding in the back of a closet (yes I checked the closet, they hid very well). Second time hid inside a clothes drying rack full of drying laundry. Third time was outside- every time I called her name in the back, she came to the back, but by that point I'd run to the front looking for her, rinse and repeat a few times. Fourth time hiding under a computer desk at 3am... checked her bed and it was empty, but she had snuck to the computer to play video games. When she heard me coming down the stairs she hid.

One problem is when parents freak out they start screaming the kid's name.... and of course the little kid thinks you're angry so they make more effort to hide.

I believe one of Princess Diana's sons once his so well the police were called in to search the castle and they found him in an alcove.

Each incident lasted less than 10 minutes but was utterly terrifying. I'm not sure when we would have called police... after 15 minutes? 20 minutes? I hope to never experience it again.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,471 posts, read 15,905,878 times
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Something similar happened to me.

Our son was about 2 and we both laid down for a rest one afternoon. I must have fallen asleep. When I woke up he was not next to me in bed or playing in the bedroom. I searched all over, calling his name again and again very loudly. The front door and door to the basement were both locked so he had to be someplace in the house.

After searching our tiny condo for almost an hour we finally found him. He had crawled under the bed in the same room. There was a very tiny space between the wall and a suitcase under the bed and that is where he was sound asleep. When I looked under the bed all I saw was the suitcase, which appeared to me to be up against the wall.

I had already called my husband home to help search and we were just about to call the police when we found our son. So, strange things do happen to regular people.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,471 posts, read 15,905,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaylahc View Post
I have heard of kids falling asleep in closets or laundry baskets and "go missing".
(snip)
My little brother (now 56 years old but still my "little brother") was constantly getting lost when he was a preschooler. He often would decide to suddenly take a nap at odd times and in odd places, behind the sofa, under furniture, on soft hay in the haymow, next to baby kittens in the barn behind sacks of feed, in a shed or the garage in an open box and yes, very often in the back of closets and under clothes in laundry baskets.

And, on a large farm, it sometimes took the entire family searching for quite some time to find him.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 10:59 AM
 
9,056 posts, read 6,722,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Molli View Post
I'd say the first time this happens and they call the police is excusable. Now the parents need to create a plan to be able to find their own kid in their own house if this happens again. Perhaps putting some kind of bracelet on him that will beep via a remote control or something like that.
Regardless, if they think the child is in danger - calling the police is the right move. I don't want people to ever get the idea that they shouldn't because they will be judged to have done something "inexcusable" by their peers. Time is of the essence in these instances. Better to feel a bit silly and have your child rather than waste precious time should you be correct in your fears.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 11:08 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,940,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Regardless, if they think the child is in danger - calling the police is the right move. I don't want people to ever get the idea that they shouldn't because they will be judged to have done something "inexcusable" by their peers. Time is of the essence in these instances. Better to feel a bit silly and have your child rather than waste precious time should you be correct in your fears.
I think Molli is upset because a dog was shot as a result of this. Of course they should have called the police, but I hope they are feeling something other than a bit silly since their neighbor's dog was shot. The odds are slim something like that would happen. Parents lose their kids everyday without it making the news. This one made the news because the dog was shot. It's really the officer's fault though, not the parents who called the police.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 11:53 AM
 
9,056 posts, read 6,722,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I think Molli is upset because a dog was shot as a result of this. Of course they should have called the police, but I hope they are feeling something other than a bit silly since their neighbor's dog was shot. The odds are slim something like that would happen. Parents lose their kids everyday without it making the news. This one made the news because the dog was shot. It's really the officer's fault though, not the parents who called the police.
How could they possibly foresee that happening?
 
Old 08-07-2014, 11:56 AM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 2,945,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I think Molli is upset because a dog was shot as a result of this. Of course they should have called the police, but I hope they are feeling something other than a bit silly since their neighbor's dog was shot. The odds are slim something like that would happen. Parents lose their kids everyday without it making the news. This one made the news because the dog was shot. It's really the officer's fault though, not the parents who called the police.
When we give guns to novice police officers, we're asking for trouble. We're violating common sense, and suffering the consequences of that violation. We're just lucky he didn't shoot a bunch of kids. What if a bunch of kids were throwing rocks at him, or something that looked like a grenade? He doesn't have time to think. He can only react, from all his years of experience as a novice police officer.

So go ahead and blame the officer. We can't blame those really responsible for the rules that let novice police officers carry guns. Because those people, the voters, are us. And it would not be human for us to blame ourselves.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 12:19 PM
 
44,564 posts, read 43,091,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
In the 80s, a child went missing in an area near where I lived. I believe the child was about 4 or maybe 5 years old.

No one had noticed the child wandering in the neighborhood but the house had been searched and so the whole community was frantic. And of course, an abduction was suspected after a day or so.

As it turned out, the father had a metal tool chest of some sort, and the child had managed to crawl in, the lid close and he suffocated in the chest. The chest was right there in the home - maybe on a porch or in an outbuilding - I can't remember the circumstances exactly. Because the chest was comparatively small (not big like a trunk) no one had perceived a child could crawl in it, but with knees to chin (fetal position), yes, a child fit in that tiny space.

There was no suspicion about child abuse and no sign of the child being abused, so the parents/family were never under suspicion of actually "stuffing" the child into the box.

So yes, a child can hide and even die on the premises. A child can drown in only 2 inches of water, for example, and if the pond is surrounded by tall grasses, it could take folks a while to notice a child was missing and/or in distress.

Best to call law enforcement as soon as a parent realizes he/she doesn't know where a child is.
Interesting that you mentioned the 1980s. It reminds me of an episode of Punky Brewster. Cherie was playing hide and seek with her friends in the lot near her apartment. Henry Warnimont put his old refrigerator out there. Cherie picked the refrigerator as a hiding spot, where she later passed out.
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