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View Poll Results: Based on the situation below, do you feel the parents are:
Morons because they couldn't find the kid. 10 18.87%
Correct for calling the police, because it's an understandable situation. 43 81.13%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-07-2014, 12:52 PM
 
28,411 posts, read 14,144,643 times
Reputation: 19545

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I appreciate the voting and the replies. I was in a "debate" over in Current Events, and a few people over there felt that it was essentially negligent to call the police in this situation. It was my contention that it was possible to have a "missing" child in the home and calling the police was reasonable.

The background to this is that police were called for a missing non-verbal 3-year-old who was eventually found wrapped in a blanket under a box sleeping in the basement. When the parents couldn't find the child, they called the police. When the police arrived, they searched the home and didn't find the child either.

Additional officers began to arrive and search the surrounding area. One officer entered a fenced backyard to check some bushes and a shed for the child. After he checked the shed and was walking back through the yard, he was confronted by the homeowner's dog. The officer shot and killed the dog claiming he was in fear of being attacked.

I think it's horrible this dog died and feel really bad for the dog's owner; however, my belief it that the situation that put the officer in the backyard (not his actions once there, but that put him there) were reasonable.

I felt the parents acted reasonable for calling the police, and I felt the police were reasonable for searching the yards in the immediate area of the child's home. There is way too much speculation based on a lack of facts, since there was no video or additional witnesses, to say whether the cop was justified in shooting the dog.

Anyways, this thread just allowed me to demonstrate that calling the police in such a situation was reasonable.

Thank you again.

Edit: Link fixed. Thank you Scarlet.

Geist: A Dog Shot by a Policeman

Last edited by PedroMartinez; 08-07-2014 at 01:45 PM..

 
Old 08-07-2014, 01:28 PM
 
5,413 posts, read 4,821,663 times
Reputation: 9351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I think Molli is upset because a dog was shot as a result of this. Of course they should have called the police, but I hope they are feeling something other than a bit silly since their neighbor's dog was shot. The odds are slim something like that would happen. Parents lose their kids everyday without it making the news. This one made the news because the dog was shot. It's really the officer's fault though, not the parents who called the police.
Two very separate issues. Call the officer in question moronic if one must namecall.....but not the parents.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 02:00 PM
 
12,921 posts, read 19,803,871 times
Reputation: 33954
Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
When we give guns to novice police officers, we're asking for trouble. We're violating common sense, and suffering the consequences of that violation. We're just lucky he didn't shoot a bunch of kids. What if a bunch of kids were throwing rocks at him, or something that looked like a grenade? He doesn't have time to think. He can only react, from all his years of experience as a novice police officer.

So go ahead and blame the officer. We can't blame those really responsible for the rules that let novice police officers carry guns. Because those people, the voters, are us. And it would not be human for us to blame ourselves.
The entire gun culture in the US lacks common sense, but taking them away from police offices is hardly the answer.

The dog is a regrettable victim. The police absolutely should have been called, and unless I was positive one of my kids could not get out of the house, I would have done the same thing.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 04:00 PM
 
2,321 posts, read 2,363,674 times
Reputation: 2645
Quote:
Originally Posted by FinsterRufus View Post
Regardless, if they think the child is in danger - calling the police is the right move. I don't want people to ever get the idea that they shouldn't because they will be judged to have done something "inexcusable" by their peers. Time is of the essence in these instances. Better to feel a bit silly and have your child rather than waste precious time should you be correct in your fears.
Oh I agree with you. My point was only to say that now that the parents KNOW about this possible problem they should at least try to work on a solution to try to avoid using up the resources of the police department. The first time they didn't know. Now they know.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
55 posts, read 25,751 times
Reputation: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molli View Post
Oh I agree with you. My point was only to say that now that the parents KNOW about this possible problem they should at least try to work on a solution to try to avoid using up the resources of the police department. The first time they didn't know. Now they know.
What is it that the parents know now, though? It sounds to me as though the kid was just being a kid.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 04:43 PM
 
2,321 posts, read 2,363,674 times
Reputation: 2645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemissa View Post
What is it that the parents know now, though? It sounds to me as though the kid was just being a kid.
No its a little more than that. The articles have said that the kid is non-verbal. So the parents know that if they are calling out for the kid he isn't going to answer. If he hides, they need to have some sort of monitor on him (like a bracelet) that could emit some sort of signal re his location, etc. Think about it -- they were lucky this time! The kid could wander away from his house and if he is nonverbal they need a way to locate him. I would think that there is already devices on the market for nonverbal kids to help locate them.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,491 posts, read 15,940,606 times
Reputation: 38845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemissa View Post
What is it that the parents know now, though? It sounds to me as though the kid was just being a kid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molli View Post
No its a little more than that. The articles have said that the kid is non-verbal. So the parents know that if they are calling out for the kid he isn't going to answer. If he hides, they need to have some sort of monitor on him (like a bracelet) that could emit some sort of signal re his location, etc. Think about it -- they were lucky this time! The kid could wander away from his house and if he is nonverbal they need a way to locate him. I would think that there is already devices on the market for nonverbal kids to help locate them.
There are a number of different types of devices for children & adults with special needs as well as for the elderly with dementia. Some are alarmed to start beeping or to set off an alarm if the child/adult gets too far away from the monitor or goes through an invisible fence and others have GPS tracking inside so the child/adult can be located if they go missing. There probably are other types of devices, as well.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 05:07 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,864 posts, read 18,910,587 times
Reputation: 25118
I wouldn't be able to lose my kids in my house, but I remember once my parents lost me when I was a teen. We were staying in a condo at the beach and I had a bad allergic reaction that caused me to become really disoriented. Somehow I decided to crawl under a spare mattress in the closet in the master bedroom (I think because it was dark and quiet and I had a headache and a fever). My parents looked everywhere for me, even outdoors. I woke up and crawled back out and they were mad because they thought I'd hidden on purpose, until they realized how ill and confused I was. So I can understand it happening, and it would be even more frightening with such a young child.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 05:26 PM
 
15,294 posts, read 16,849,408 times
Reputation: 15020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molli View Post
Oh I agree with you. My point was only to say that now that the parents KNOW about this possible problem they should at least try to work on a solution to try to avoid using up the resources of the police department. The first time they didn't know. Now they know.
If you have never had a non-verbal child who is an elopement risk, you have no idea what you are saying. Yes, parents need to attempt to make sure the child is safe, but autistic children are often quite adept at escaping (and often head toward water).

Also, sometimes children like this like to squeeze into small spaces.
 
Old 08-07-2014, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,992 posts, read 98,847,978 times
Reputation: 31412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molli View Post
No its a little more than that. The articles have said that the kid is non-verbal. So the parents know that if they are calling out for the kid he isn't going to answer. If he hides, they need to have some sort of monitor on him (like a bracelet) that could emit some sort of signal re his location, etc. Think about it -- they were lucky this time! The kid could wander away from his house and if he is nonverbal they need a way to locate him. I would think that there is already devices on the market for nonverbal kids to help locate them.
Back in the late 80s/early 90s, when the kidnapping hysteria was going on, there were all sorts of devices like that on the market. Sadly, many times when they were really needed, they didn't work. I'm sure technology has improved in the last 30 years, but the product still may not function when you need it. And kids are as adept as pets at getting such devices off their person.
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