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View Poll Results: Based on the situation below, do you feel the parents are:
Morons because they couldn't find the kid. 10 18.87%
Correct for calling the police, because it's an understandable situation. 43 81.13%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-08-2014, 08:05 AM
 
28,411 posts, read 14,127,306 times
Reputation: 19545

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Yes, better safe than sorry, but calling the police doesn't actually make you safe. The best compromise might be to get the neighbor's dog to search for your child. The dog would be glad to do that to avoid capital punishment.
So your recommendation for any parent whose child goes missing is to not call the cops but instead ask the neighbor with the dog to perform a search.

 
Old 08-08-2014, 08:17 AM
 
10,157 posts, read 9,907,643 times
Reputation: 3914
Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
There is a recent story in the news where a non-vocalizing 3-year-old went missing which lead to a police search. In the story, the 3-year-old went down to the basement, wrapped itself in a blanket under a box and fell asleep. A short time later, the parents began searching for the child, and when not found, called the police. The police did a search and also could not locate the child in the house.

Do you feel it is "reasonable" that a parent was unable to locate the child and call police in this situation?

Yes. When i was three i crawled under a double bed way back in the corner and went to sleep. The search took 45 minutes they said.
 
Old 08-08-2014, 10:35 AM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,153,006 times
Reputation: 3833
Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Yes, better safe than sorry, but calling the police doesn't actually make you safe. The best compromise might be to get the neighbor's dog to search for your child. The dog would be glad to do that to avoid capital punishment.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
So your recommendation for any parent whose child goes missing is to not call the cops but instead ask the neighbor with the dog to perform a search.
No, eok's point was to make a snide remark tied to a fairly recent story about how a missing child search prompted a policeman to enter someone's backyard and ultimately shoot the dog who lived there who ran barking and snarling towards him (the child was ultimately found in their own house after a fairly extensive search). But that's one story, happens very rarely, and shouldn't be used as a reason to believe that parents should use untrained neighborhood dogs to perform missing person searches.
 
Old 08-08-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Maui County, HI
4,131 posts, read 6,064,045 times
Reputation: 3357
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
My little brother (now 56 years old but still my "little brother") was constantly getting lost when he was a preschooler. He often would decide to suddenly take a nap at odd times and in odd places, behind the sofa, under furniture, on soft hay in the haymow, next to baby kittens in the barn behind sacks of feed, in a shed or the garage in an open box and yes, very often in the back of closets and under clothes in laundry baskets.

And, on a large farm, it sometimes took the entire family searching for quite some time to find him.
If a child does weird things like that, I would think the parents should get him some kind mental health check. Obviously something is wrong if a kid is just running off and "taking naps" in closets and under clothes like a damn cat. That's not normal behavior for a human being.
 
Old 08-08-2014, 02:58 PM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,153,006 times
Reputation: 3833
Quote:
Originally Posted by winkosmosis View Post
If a child does weird things like that, I would think the parents should get him some kind mental health check. Obviously something is wrong if a kid is just running off and "taking naps" in closets and under clothes like a damn cat. That's not normal behavior for a human being.
They obviously lived on a large farm, and the kid probably had his run of the place. Falling asleep next to kittens (was probably playing with them), in laundry (warm and cozy), on a haystack (cushy), or even any of those other places doesn't mean the small child had a mental disorder. You must've been a crazy helicopter parent or someone with zero imagination if you think a child is exhibiting a mental disorder because he falls asleep at various places on a farm. There are plenty of people who are able to fall asleep almost anywhere they happen to be, and they don't have mental disorders.
 
Old 08-08-2014, 04:15 PM
 
5,413 posts, read 4,816,219 times
Reputation: 9351
Quote:
Originally Posted by winkosmosis View Post
If a child does weird things like that, I would think the parents should get him some kind mental health check. Obviously something is wrong if a kid is just running off and "taking naps" in closets and under clothes like a damn cat. That's not normal behavior for a human being.
That is very normal kid behavior...especially if the kid is a bit of an introvert or a 'dreamer'. Where do you get mental illness in any of that?
 
Old 08-08-2014, 04:33 PM
 
15,287 posts, read 16,833,735 times
Reputation: 15019
Quote:
Originally Posted by smommaof3 View Post
If he's three and not talking, he probably has some sort of mental illness/retardation. Even more reason he shouldn't be left alone.
A nonverbal child can actually be very smart. What you don't know about the subject would probably fill an encyclopedia.

Nonverbal children might be deaf (in which case they learn sign language, but still won't hear you calling their name)
Nonverbal children can have apraxia (oral motor problems lead them to not being able to speak).
Nonverbal children can be simply speech-delayed (these kids catch up with speech therapy)
Nonverbal children can be autistic (these kids can learn to speak with therapy, but some never learn and use voice technology to communicate - Ipads are very helpful for many of these kids).

These children have IQs that range from very low to very high. See the story about Jacob Barnett who was diagnosed with autism at 2 when he was not communicating and who not only learned to speak and read, but who is currently doing original research in physics at 15. His professors say if his research pans out, he will be headed for the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Most kids are more average than genius, but you never know. You cannot tell at 3 or 4 which nonverbal child will do amazing things.

As for not leaving a child who is nonverbal alone - you cannot always be with a child. You may need to go to the toilet or shower or do laundry or do dishes. Most of the time, the child will probably be playing in the same room with you, but kids are quick and you can turn your back for just a minute or two and they can hide. He might even have been playing hide and seek.
 
Old 08-08-2014, 04:45 PM
 
15,744 posts, read 13,171,628 times
Reputation: 19636
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
A nonverbal child can actually be very smart. What you don't know about the subject would probably fill an encyclopedia.

Nonverbal children might be deaf (in which case they learn sign language, but still won't hear you calling their name)
Nonverbal children can have apraxia (oral motor problems lead them to not being able to speak).
Nonverbal children can be simply speech-delayed (these kids catch up with speech therapy)
Nonverbal children can be autistic (these kids can learn to speak with therapy, but some never learn and use voice technology to communicate - Ipads are very helpful for many of these kids).

These children have IQs that range from very low to very high. See the story about Jacob Barnett who was diagnosed with autism at 2 when he was not communicating and who not only learned to speak and read, but who is currently doing original research in physics at 15. His professors say if his research pans out, he will be headed for the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Most kids are more average than genius, but you never know. You cannot tell at 3 or 4 which nonverbal child will do amazing things.

As for not leaving a child who is nonverbal alone - you cannot always be with a child. You may need to go to the toilet or shower or do laundry or do dishes. Most of the time, the child will probably be playing in the same room with you, but kids are quick and you can turn your back for just a minute or two and they can hide. He might even have been playing hide and seek.
All true but if you have a nonverbal child you have a responsibility to have a plan in place, which should probably use some technology, for limiting the areas they can wander off too. Nonverbal three year olds, and probably all three year olds should not have access to basements and other areas of the home where they can get "lost".
 
Old 08-08-2014, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,481 posts, read 15,913,707 times
Reputation: 38756
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
My little brother (now 56 years old but still my "little brother") was constantly getting lost when he was a preschooler. He often would decide to suddenly take a nap at odd times and in odd places, behind the sofa, under furniture, on soft hay in the haymow, next to baby kittens in the barn behind sacks of feed, in a shed or the garage in an open box and yes, very often in the back of closets and under clothes in laundry baskets.

And, on a large farm, it sometimes took the entire family searching for quite some time to find him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by winkosmosis View Post
If a child does weird things like that, I would think the parents should get him some kind mental health check. Obviously something is wrong if a kid is just running off and "taking naps" in closets and under clothes like a damn cat. That's not normal behavior for a human being.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisfitBanana View Post
They obviously lived on a large farm, and the kid probably had his run of the place. Falling asleep next to kittens (was probably playing with them), in laundry (warm and cozy), on a haystack (cushy), or even any of those other places doesn't mean the small child had a mental disorder. You must've been a crazy helicopter parent or someone with zero imagination if you think a child is exhibiting a mental disorder because he falls asleep at various places on a farm. There are plenty of people who are able to fall asleep almost anywhere they happen to be, and they don't have mental disorders.
Hey, Winko! You are talking about my baby brother! Chill out!

Of course, he didn't/doesn't have a mental disorder. He is now an executive at a large computer firm and I think that he supervises over 200 people.

He grew up in the late 50s/early 60s and many young children had "freedom of movement" at that time. Having the run of the buildings on the farm for a farm kid is the very same as a young child being able to play in their backyard, play on the back yard swing set, go inside the family garage and the family garden shed as well as have the run of the house.

Most people think that children growing up with that amount of freedom had an idyllic childhood and not that they had a mental disorder because they fell asleep playing with baby kittens rather than when mom demanded that they fall asleep in their bed because it was 2:00 on the dot. Sheesh!

Last edited by germaine2626; 08-08-2014 at 07:38 PM..
 
Old 08-08-2014, 11:50 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 2,946,432 times
Reputation: 8439
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisfitBanana View Post




No, eok's point was to make a snide remark tied to a fairly recent story about how a missing child search prompted a policeman to enter someone's backyard and ultimately shoot the dog who lived there who ran barking and snarling towards him (the child was ultimately found in their own house after a fairly extensive search). But that's one story, happens very rarely, and shouldn't be used as a reason to believe that parents should use untrained neighborhood dogs to perform missing person searches.
Untrained? What good does training do? Cops have training, but they cause more problems than they solve. I've never met a competent cop. I'm reminded of Jeffrey Dahmer, the guy who drugged and killed boys and had sex with their dead bodies. When one of the drugged boys escaped from him, some cops helped catch him and gave him back to him, to be killed. That's an extreme example, but is the kind of behavior I've come to expect from cops. Incompetence, harassment, and violence.

Once when I got attacked by street muggers, the cops wasted time questioning me while the muggers were getting away. When someone broke into my car, the only thing the cop did was write a report. I've never once been in any situation where a cop did anything competent. An untrained dog is 100 times better than a trained cop.
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