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Old 08-22-2014, 11:41 PM
 
2,540 posts, read 3,316,160 times
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You guys are scaring me with the hyperlexia thing My son was a really early reader - he started reading before three and when I say started, I really mean he taught himself literally, as it would never have occurred to me to start 'teaching' him that early. I did read a lot to him and when I saw he was really interested in letters I encouraged it, he knew the alphabet by 20 months. He's 4.5 now, he reads and writes in two languages now (we're bilingual), he loooves writing and typing and spelling and he'll type up whole paragraphs with not a single spelling error - I'm honestly not bragging but it is kind of mind-boggling. And I do notice his comprehension is definitely behind his 'technical' reading, although probably on par with boys his age. It's like he loves the 'decoding' part of reading, and is more interested in that than the actual content - he loves reading ingredient lists, instruction manuals, magazines, recipes, anything he can get his hands on and the less 'childish' the better, lol.

Does sound like hyperlexia? He's not behind in any other areas but is somewhat on the immature side socially/ emotionally.
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Old 08-23-2014, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,529 posts, read 16,041,860 times
Reputation: 39014
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
You guys are scaring me with the hyperlexia thing My son was a really early reader - he started reading before three and when I say started, I really mean he taught himself literally, as it would never have occurred to me to start 'teaching' him that early. I did read a lot to him and when I saw he was really interested in letters I encouraged it, he knew the alphabet by 20 months. He's 4.5 now, he reads and writes in two languages now (we're bilingual), he loooves writing and typing and spelling and he'll type up whole paragraphs with not a single spelling error - I'm honestly not bragging but it is kind of mind-boggling. And I do notice his comprehension is definitely behind his 'technical' reading, although probably on par with boys his age. It's like he loves the 'decoding' part of reading, and is more interested in that than the actual content - he loves reading ingredient lists, instruction manuals, magazines, recipes, anything he can get his hands on and the less 'childish' the better, lol.

Does sound like hyperlexia? He's not behind in any other areas but is somewhat on the immature side socially/ emotionally.
Although, it is obviously hard to tell for sure from the little information that you listed, but it is more likely that your child is an early reader because he is a bright child and not because it is something to worry about.

I'll share another story of one of my students where the extreme early reading helped indicate a problem. The child had just turned four years old and could read words at the mid fourth grade level (frankly, he probably read at a higher level but I just got tired of testing by that point), however, he did not have a clue how to remove his coat, hat, shoes or any clothes at all. It was not that he was lazy or spoiled he just did not understand at all how to do anything like that.

Think back to when your child was a baby/young toddler I bet that he would pull off his hat, mittens and socks? And, now as a 4 1/2 year old he probably gets totally dressed by himself, right? Imagine, if you child could do all of that reading & writing but would just stand there unable to figure out how to get dressed or undressed.

In some of the cases where early reading and/writing indicates a problems it is because the child is seriously delayed in other areas or there is large range of skills. Perhaps reading at the second grade level as a three or four year old but social skills at an 18 month level, motor skills at a two year level and dressing skills like a two and half year old.

If an early reader's other skills are age appropriate or nearly age appropriate it may be a sign of being a very smart kid who stays a super smart kid. Or the child can be an early reader and by second grade by a typical on grade level reader.

Think about children who are early walkers. Just because they are early walkers it does not mean that they will be talented dancers or skilled athletes, they may be but at age three their motor skills are probably pretty similar to kids who started walking at a year or 15 months instead of 9 months like they did.

Evilcookie, your son's skills do sound pretty mind-boggling.
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Old 08-23-2014, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,809,051 times
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When I was visiting my brother and his family, their 4 year old daughter was helping me unpack and she read every label on every product she got her hands on. I asked her Mom if she was helping her read. Mom said No she was just remembering commercials she had seen on TV and wasn't really reading.

A few weeks later I found out the sitter took my little niece into the 3rd grade classroom of her own son and my niece began reading everything written on the blackboard! They all just stood there with their jaws on the floor.

So niece was super whiz kid who ended up skipping a few grades, graduating from high school at 16, won $57,000 on Jeopardy while she was in Vet School and graduated top in her class but she has had 3 failed marriages and is a very unhappy and crabby unpleasant woman with a superior academic record.
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,792,125 times
Reputation: 14503
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaylahc View Post
I always figured the babies were "memorizing" the shapes in sequence. Obviously they have no foundation for true reading.
I'm sure of this. When my dd's were little I had objects around the house labeled with their names. One day dd#2 was in her room and dh heard (as she said the letters and then the word) "K-E-L-L-Y-S" "Kelly's" "C-L-O-S-E-T" "DOOR!". (not her real name). So much for actually understanding the letters make sounds. Dh about died laughing.
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:43 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,430,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madeline2121 View Post
Some people try to make parenting a competitive sport.
I know!....how freakin ridiculous is that?
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:52 AM
 
6,461 posts, read 6,132,584 times
Reputation: 9787
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
You guys are scaring me with the hyperlexia thing My son was a really early reader - he started reading before three and when I say started, I really mean he taught himself literally, as it would never have occurred to me to start 'teaching' him that early. I did read a lot to him and when I saw he was really interested in letters I encouraged it, he knew the alphabet by 20 months. He's 4.5 now, he reads and writes in two languages now (we're bilingual), he loooves writing and typing and spelling and he'll type up whole paragraphs with not a single spelling error - I'm honestly not bragging but it is kind of mind-boggling. And I do notice his comprehension is definitely behind his 'technical' reading, although probably on par with boys his age. It's like he loves the 'decoding' part of reading, and is more interested in that than the actual content - he loves reading ingredient lists, instruction manuals, magazines, recipes, anything he can get his hands on and the less 'childish' the better, lol.

Does sound like hyperlexia? He's not behind in any other areas but is somewhat on the immature side socially/ emotionally.
There is a difference between an early reader and one who is either forced to do it or encouraged in the wrong way. ( Like encouraging reading something like college level textbooks they can not comprehend.) just allow him to explore on his own, but bring in age appropriate picture books too. Really engage him in the story aspect and talk about what you are reading.
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:56 AM
 
6,461 posts, read 6,132,584 times
Reputation: 9787
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
Although, it is obviously hard to tell for sure from the little information that you listed, but it is more likely that your child is an early reader because he is a bright child and not because it is something to worry about.

I'll share another story of one of my students where the extreme early reading helped indicate a problem. The child had just turned four years old and could read words at the mid fourth grade level (frankly, he probably read at a higher level but I just got tired of testing by that point), however, he did not have a clue how to remove his coat, hat, shoes or any clothes at all. It was not that he was lazy or spoiled he just did not understand at all how to do anything like that.

Think back to when your child was a baby/young toddler I bet that he would pull off his hat, mittens and socks? And, now as a 4 1/2 year old he probably gets totally dressed by himself, right? Imagine, if you child could do all of that reading & writing but would just stand there unable to figure out how to get dressed or undressed.

In some of the cases where early reading and/writing indicates a problems it is because the child is seriously delayed in other areas or there is large range of skills. Perhaps reading at the second grade level as a three or four year old but social skills at an 18 month level, motor skills at a two year level and dressing skills like a two and half year old.

If an early reader's other skills are age appropriate or nearly age appropriate it may be a sign of being a very smart kid who stays a super smart kid. Or the child can be an early reader and by second grade by a typical on grade level reader.

Think about children who are early walkers. Just because they are early walkers it does not mean that they will be talented dancers or skilled athletes, they may be but at age three their motor skills are probably pretty similar to kids who started walking at a year or 15 months instead of 9 months like they did.

Evilcookie, your son's skills do sound pretty mind-boggling.
This is spot on!

Don't freak out if you child is a natural early reader. Just make sure they are developing social skills, don't have issues with fine and gross motor skills, and comprehend the majority of what they read.
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Old 08-23-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,694,624 times
Reputation: 19417
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Where did we ever get the idea that an early reader meant a kid who would excel academically? It just means he learned how to read early---and sometimes lost interest pretty early as well.

In fact sometimes it turns out that a late reader or late bloomer can be the most gifted kid in the room.
NO! Say it isn't SO NK!! You mean....FIRST doesn't always mean BETTER!!?? Holy crap, you're ON to something. BTW, thanks for sharing that information, because there are clearly so many people who NEED to see it. It's an experiment.....with your kids.....and a money making venture. Wake up.
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Old 08-23-2014, 10:34 AM
 
421 posts, read 450,556 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
You guys are scaring me with the hyperlexia thing My son was a really early reader - he started reading before three and when I say started, I really mean he taught himself literally, as it would never have occurred to me to start 'teaching' him that early. I did read a lot to him and when I saw he was really interested in letters I encouraged it, he knew the alphabet by 20 months. He's 4.5 now, he reads and writes in two languages now (we're bilingual), he loooves writing and typing and spelling and he'll type up whole paragraphs with not a single spelling error - I'm honestly not bragging but it is kind of mind-boggling. And I do notice his comprehension is definitely behind his 'technical' reading, although probably on par with boys his age. It's like he loves the 'decoding' part of reading, and is more interested in that than the actual content - he loves reading ingredient lists, instruction manuals, magazines, recipes, anything he can get his hands on and the less 'childish' the better, lol.

Does sound like hyperlexia? He's not behind in any other areas but is somewhat on the immature side socially/ emotionally.
I wouldnt worry. I always feel like brains are often slanted. When they have a strength in one thing, other areas tend to suffer. There is too much pressure to make all kids the same now.

Like my son is very bright, but struggles socially.

My daughter is very artistic and creative and good at picking up math, but struggles with reading and writing.

My husband is exceptionally academically smart, but leaves some to be desired in common sense (lol!! I said that nicely)

Me, Im good at problem solving and processing a lot of information quickly, but struggle to go beyond that and really develop in a specific area.

Just facilitate him developing in all areas, but don't stress...if something comes up later, address it, but just be amazed by your guys brain
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Old 08-23-2014, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,809,051 times
Reputation: 47043
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyeye View Post
I wouldnt worry. I always feel like brains are often slanted. When they have a strength in one thing, other areas tend to suffer. There is too much pressure to make all kids the same now.

Like my son is very bright, but struggles socially.

My daughter is very artistic and creative and good at picking up math, but struggles with reading and writing.

My husband is exceptionally academically smart, but leaves some to be desired in common sense (lol!! I said that nicely)

Me, Im good at problem solving and processing a lot of information quickly, but struggle to go beyond that and really develop in a specific area.

Just facilitate him developing in all areas, but don't stress...if something comes up later, address it, but just be amazed by your guys brain
I have a husband like that too. Mensa IQ engineer but can't boil water!

My daughter who has a learning disability is a social butterfly while her sister is the perfect student but is too shy to make friends. I guess it all evens out in the long run.
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