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Old 08-24-2014, 09:28 AM
 
Location: california
5,470 posts, read 4,552,683 times
Reputation: 6402

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I wouldn't worry about it ,
If he has an interest in science and technology let him pursue it. If he prefers the company of older kids he's intelligent let him grow at his rate not the cattle prattle the world wants to stereotype kids into.
If a kid is left handed SO WHAT ?
When I was very young I loved to draw, and you never saw me with out something I was working on. I love to draw today and my children are very good as well, and I did not coach them. at all. My parents, neither one had very little artistic skills, go figure.
The box represents electronics he has fascination for , I gave one of my multimeters to a little boy that has a similar interest may be just a year or two older , it wouldn't hurt you to learn something about electricity as well ,get the books Radio shack has lots of them and projects too, kids love .
Talk about having to learn eye hand coronation .
Take some old non working electronics apart and let him see the innards , put a few projects together and see the fascination of making something that works.
I understand that there is a paste or glue now that does not need a soldering iron. but theres nothing wrong with learning about heat either , you should supervise and learn safety with him .
He sees you fallowing the rules, the the rules are important, if you don't fallow the rules, than they are not important to him either, in spite of what you might say.
Working together on a project and LEARNING together is a great bond, that is if you want to bond with your children.
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Old 08-24-2014, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,467 posts, read 15,905,878 times
Reputation: 38730
Quote:
Originally Posted by josie10001 View Post
Woah woah, that's a lot of responses in such a short time! :O

Nothing shows up on the bill for the old box (if they ask for it back, i'll gladly do so). As for the electric stuff, it seems fine, it's been unplugged for at least 48 hours now.

As for the autism thing, I've been told by some school officials (ones that i don't particularly like) that he has autism or "Aspergar" syndrome. He's 4 and he's learning on a 5th grade level in science and math (an enrichment program in our town introduced science and math to him, and he's all over it. They put him in one of the 5th grade science and math classes, and he's the highest, he's in Kindergarten)

He has tough times making friends, even in his own age group. He seems to hang out with more older kids now that i'm thinking about it
Quote:
Originally Posted by daliowa View Post
Your description sounds like he's on the Autism spectrum. You can have him evaluated by doctors that specialize in that field. A "school official" is not legally allowed to make a diagnosis.

Once diagnosed he'll be entitled to have an IEP from the school district & be able to obtain services to help him, i.e. speech, occupational, physical therapy, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
School officials are not legally allowed to make a diagnosis, but they are mandated by law to locate and identify children with disabilities within their district. That's quite a catch 22, especially with children on the Autism spectrum because early identification is crucial. And there are parents, like the OP, whose children wouldn't get identified if the school didn't say, "I think your son has Asperger's." They've already told her, and she has her head in the sand because he is doing some things on a 5th grade level. Of course she needs to have him evaluated by a doctor, but I suspect it's going to take many more school officials pushing her before she finally does.
You mentioned that he has difficulty making friends. Wouldn't it be wonderful if there was a way that he could learn how to make and keep friends? Guess what, a lot of public schools have programs or classes that help children learn age appropriate social skills. The first step is to ask the school for help. In some states, it can be done without an official medical diagnosis of Autism and in other states he would need to be evaluated by a developmental psychologist (or someone similar) before he could receive services.

What I mean is that some states allow a child to have an IEP and receive special education services, in the school setting, with documentation of certain types of significant problems without a medical diagnosis. A child may have social interaction or communication problems that seriously effect their progress in school and qualify for special education services for that reason.

Do you want you child to "be the best that he can be"? Do you want him to learn how to get along better with children his own age as well as older children? Maybe, he doesn't need help with his speech (actually talking) but he may need help in communication (how and what he expresses to others) and verbal interactions with others (the reciprocal give and take of talking with others). Does your son have difficulties in these areas?

Perhaps, he has some fine motor or handwriting delays or gross motor problems (perhaps, he is clumsier than his peers)? Perhaps, he has difficulties in one or two areas but greatly excels in other areas (such as science)? In the long run, you will be happy that you checked it out.

Good luck to you and your son.

Last edited by germaine2626; 08-24-2014 at 11:07 AM..
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Old 08-24-2014, 02:00 PM
 
4,230 posts, read 5,736,055 times
Reputation: 10032
Is his name Bender
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Old 08-24-2014, 02:04 PM
 
2,746 posts, read 3,914,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargobound View Post
Is his name Bender

Futurama reference?
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Old 08-24-2014, 03:58 PM
 
4,230 posts, read 5,736,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daliowa View Post
Futurama reference?
Yes
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Old 08-24-2014, 06:48 PM
 
1,469 posts, read 1,385,596 times
Reputation: 1983
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
One cannot usually be shocked by an electronic device unless it is plugged in and gets wet.

Just because your child excels in math and science does not mean he is not autistic hence the movie
Rain Man.
The real life "Rain Man", Kim Peek was not autistic. He had agenesis of the corpus collosum.
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Old 08-25-2014, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
7,215 posts, read 7,563,902 times
Reputation: 7717
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
One cannot usually be shocked by an electronic device unless it is plugged in and gets wet.
Actually, capacitors in certain devices can store a charge for a certain period of time, even after being unplugged...however, you would actually have to dismantle it to get to those pieces. Pretty unlikely scenario as laid out.

Anyway, I think it's kind of funny. Our son has taken his toy golf club to bed on a couple occasions. Doesn't seem like something to worry about to me.
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Old 08-25-2014, 09:47 AM
 
16,724 posts, read 13,665,130 times
Reputation: 40996
Quote:
Originally Posted by josie10001 View Post

As for the autism thing, I've been told by some school officials (ones that i don't particularly like) that he has autism or "Aspergar" syndrome. He's 4 and he's learning on a 5th grade level in science and math (an enrichment program in our town introduced science and math to him, and he's all over it. They put him in one of the 5th grade science and math classes, and he's the highest, he's in Kindergarten)

He has tough times making friends, even in his own age group. He seems to hang out with more older kids now that i'm thinking about it
I hope you aren't not taking their suggestions just because you don't like his teachers. You are describing an Autistic child.
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Old 08-25-2014, 03:52 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 3,178,649 times
Reputation: 3467
I was going to make a comment about autism as well, but it isn't a guarantee.

My cousin, who was diagnosed with autism at age 12, used to be attached to odd things. Mainly, things that could be plugged in. He LOVED the vaccuum cleaner, hair dryers, and curling irons. He had a little collection he would carry around. My grandma said when she would read him stories, he would point out all the electrical outlets in the picture books lololol. So yeah, kids on the spectrum can get attached to odd things.
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Old 08-25-2014, 07:38 PM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,373,641 times
Reputation: 17153
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
One cannot usually be shocked by an electronic device unless it is plugged in and gets wet.

Just because your child excels in math and science does not mean he is not autistic hence the movie
Rain Man.

Quote:
Originally Posted by charmed hour View Post
The real life "Rain Man", Kim Peek was not autistic. He had agenesis of the corpus collosum.
But he was only the INSPIRATION for the MOVIE.

In the movie, Babbit WAS portrayed as autistic savant. It was 1988, after all.

Kim Peek - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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