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Old 10-05-2014, 03:55 PM
 
Location: usa
1,001 posts, read 864,158 times
Reputation: 815

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I read this article
Fewer parents helping to pay for college - Jun. 26, 2014

I don't know much about their sources or anything, but it's saying only 77% of parents plan to help their kids out with college.

Why have a kid if you don't want to (or have the means to) help the kid succeed?

Say what you like about college, but good luck moving anywhere without a college degree.

Even a masters degree is becoming a pre req for a lot of good jobs.
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Old 10-05-2014, 04:01 PM
 
1,780 posts, read 2,160,732 times
Reputation: 5872
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellastar2345 View Post
I read this article
Fewer parents helping to pay for college - Jun. 26, 2014

I don't know much about their sources or anything, but it's saying only 77% of parents plan to help their kids out with college.

Why have a kid if you don't want to (or have the means to) help the kid succeed?

Say what you like about college, but good luck moving anywhere without a college degree.

Even a masters degree is becoming a pre req for a lot of good jobs.
My 2nd husband (my *last* husband) put himself through college 7,000 years ago (late 1970s). He was very poor (Appalachian poverty), got a scholarship, but also worked as a janitor for several years. Hard times, but good life lessons. He's been a litigation attorney for 30+ years now.

When it was time for his son to go to college, my husband spent many tens of thousands to put his son through four years of college. He didn't want Junior to have to work like he'd worked. (Boy, I could write an entire essay on that.)

Well, that story did not have a happy ending.

Even if you have the money to pay for a child's degree, it's not always a good thing.
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Old 10-05-2014, 04:05 PM
 
13,148 posts, read 20,735,671 times
Reputation: 35366
You do, of course, realize that some parents cannot afford to help with college expenses, correct? And sometimes that is through no fault of their own? I'm actually surprised 77% plan to pay. The workers hit hardest by layoffs are the ones in their late middle aged years, prime time to see their offspring ready for college. Those parents are the ones struggling to find new jobs that pay well enough to keep a similar standard of living.

I think it's wonderful when parents can, and do pay for college. We did. But, I also have no problem with parents who cannot afford to, or are uncomfortable with running themselves into debt to do so, just as the wage-earning years are lessening.
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Old 10-05-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: usa
1,001 posts, read 864,158 times
Reputation: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosemaryT View Post
My 2nd husband (my *last* husband) put himself through college 7,000 years ago (late 1970s). He was very poor (Appalachian poverty), got a scholarship, but also worked as a janitor for several years. Hard times, but good life lessons. He's been a litigation attorney for 30+ years now.

When it was time for his son to go to college, my husband spent many tens of thousands to put his son through four years of college. He didn't want Junior to have to work like he'd worked. (Boy, I could write an entire essay on that.)

Well, that story did not have a happy ending.

Even if you have the money to pay for a child's degree, it's not always a good thing.
To every horror story, there's a good one.

i'm a senior in college, and my parents paid the full amount. However, I've already gotten (and accepted) a job offer from a major company with a decent start salary (60k). It wouldn't have happened without college (and really my parents supporting me).

As a side note, my parents are telling me to give up the job and to continue on getting a masters degree (on their dime).

Last edited by stellastar2345; 10-05-2014 at 05:12 PM..
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Old 10-05-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,112,203 times
Reputation: 11699
It isn't my business to say what anyone else should do regarding a child's college education and certainly not whether or not they should have a child if they can't put that child through college. If parents can't afford to send a child to college, it isn't exactly a horror story. Directing the behavior of another family is not a responsibility I desire.
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Old 10-05-2014, 04:56 PM
 
13,148 posts, read 20,735,671 times
Reputation: 35366
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellastar2345 View Post
To every horror story, there's a good one.

i'm a senior college, and my parents paid the full amount. However, I've already gotten (and accepted) a job offer from a major company with a decent start salary (60k). It wouldn't have happened without college (and really my parents supporting me).

As a side note, my parents are telling me to give up the job and to continue on getting a masters degree (on their dime).
I'm far more impressed with students who make their own decisions and pay for any future degrees after having their college paid for.
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Old 10-05-2014, 05:02 PM
 
2,779 posts, read 4,659,390 times
Reputation: 5034
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellastar2345 View Post
I read this article
Fewer parents helping to pay for college - Jun. 26, 2014

I don't know much about their sources or anything, but it's saying only 77% of parents plan to help their kids out with college.

Why have a kid if you don't want to (or have the means to) help the kid succeed?

Say what you like about college, but good luck moving anywhere without a college degree.

Even a masters degree is becoming a pre req for a lot of good jobs.
You sound very young and spoiled. Come back in a few years when you understand finances (ie. you're paying your own bills without mommy and daddy) and be indignant then.
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Old 10-05-2014, 05:03 PM
 
Location: usa
1,001 posts, read 864,158 times
Reputation: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubi3 View Post
It isn't my business to say what anyone else should do regarding a child's college education and certainly not whether or not they should have a child if they can't put that child through college. If parents can't afford to send a child to college, it isn't exactly a horror story. Directing the behavior of another family is not a responsibility I desire.

I've been actively trying to meet people at my college who are paying their own way. Their life is much much harder than mine (and probably will continue to be harder) mainly because of their parents (And their college major, but that's another story).

I.e if you aren't an engineering/cs or a finance/accounting major, chances are you aren't going to get a paid internship. You pretty much need internships (real life experience) to land the entry level job. If you pay for everything yourself, you can't afford to work for free.

You are directly putting your kid at a distinct disadvantage. Why do you feel that passing along your genes is so important that you are willing to hurt your child's chances at a good life?
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Old 10-05-2014, 05:13 PM
 
579 posts, read 751,466 times
Reputation: 679
It's a double edged sword. If you pay for everything for your kid they very well may take it for granted, pick a stupid major with no thought for the future, and have an entitlement attitude throughout life and not work hard to attain their goals (waste their time in school partying, etc.). On the other hand, if a young adult has no help at all they're more likely to drop out or never finish college in the first place.

Personally I'd like to see my kids take at least some direct responsibility for college costs, I think it would be a useful wake up call for them. As my husband says, the school of hard knocks is the best school to learn from.... and the one school no one wants to attend.

But his opinion is to pay for everything for them, so that's probably what's going to happen.
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Old 10-05-2014, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,294 posts, read 10,288,998 times
Reputation: 28326
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellastar2345 View Post
I read this article
[url=http://money.cnn.com/2014/06/26/pf/college/parents-college/]

Why have a kid if you don't want to (or have the means to) help the kid succeed?


so if parents won't be able to help their child through college in 18 years, they shouldn't have a baby?

Really?

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