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View Poll Results: In general, which gender of child is overall easier to raise, girls or boys?
(For women): A girl is overall easier to raise than a boy. 15 16.67%
(For women): A boy is overall easier to raise than a girl. 37 41.11%
(For men): A girl is overall easier to raise than a boy. 9 10.00%
(For men): A boy is overall easier to raise than a girl. 29 32.22%
Voters: 90. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-10-2014, 01:14 AM
 
Location: NYC
11,836 posts, read 7,728,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I don't think you can say that one is harder to raise than the other, too many variables.
Your arguments posted above is more about choice rather than need.

You're telling me that your boy wears brand name clothing is a necessity vs a girl's bra and undies?

Given similar necessity even girls will admit they are much higher maintenance than boys.

Girls needs pads when they go through periods, there is ZERO equivalent needs for boys.

It seems to me you got boys that you allowed them to become higher maintenance. No question if you allow your boys to become materialistic they can go over board.

Girls with 10 pair of shoes is not uncommon but boys with 10 pairs is not as common unless the parents becomes their ATM machine which you probably have became.
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Old 10-10-2014, 01:25 AM
 
405 posts, read 387,718 times
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I have 14 year old twins (1 boy, 1 girl) and I believe that my son has been easier for me to raise than my daughter has been. My son is easier to shop for and easier to talk to about certain things. I will say though that I think my daughter would be more willing to come to me with a problem than my son would be. He's in the stage where he knows everything.

This isn't part of the question, but I will say that my daughter has been more fun to raise than my son. She gets me out of my comfort zone and has me doing things I could have never imagined myself doing. For instance, when she was little and I was sitting at one of her tea parties with her and her stuffed animals. I've found myself not only buying Barbie dolls for her, but also playing with them with her. Also, when I was going through school, the schools around here didn't offer kids a chance to play soccer competitively. My daughter is on her high school team and when she was little, even though I knew nothing about the sport, I found myself coaching one of her youth soccer teams.
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Old 10-10-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
7,846 posts, read 10,279,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
Your arguments posted above is more about choice rather than need.

You're telling me that your boy wears brand name clothing is a necessity vs a girl's bra and undies?

Given similar necessity even girls will admit they are much higher maintenance than boys.

Girls needs pads when they go through periods, there is ZERO equivalent needs for boys.

It seems to me you got boys that you allowed them to become higher maintenance. No question if you allow your boys to become materialistic they can go over board.

Girls with 10 pair of shoes is not uncommon but boys with 10 pairs is not as common unless the parents becomes their ATM machine which you probably have became.

There is no right or wrong answer. Every child is easier or harder DEPENDING. Big whoop that girls get their periods. The average box of pads or tampons is about $4, which can last 1-2 cycles DEPENDING on the girl. Is that your biggest arguement as to why girls are harder ro raise? Not all bras and panties are expensive and depending on the girl's shape, she can get away with sports bras or tank bras which aren't expensive. What if Dubble's kids were reversed and it was the girl who wanted the name brand clothing and the boy wore t-shirts and jeans? Would it make a difference?
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Old 10-10-2014, 08:46 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,420,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MerriMAC View Post
Which gender of child is easier to raise (birth through age 18)? Generalizing is fine based on your experience or observations.

I'm also interested to see what adult women and adult men think separately about this question. So I've incorporated that into the poll as well.
You should have added the option: "neither"

1. Each comes with it's own set of challenges. Girls whine a lot...Boys can't stop moving for one second...
2. Have you accounted for disabilities in your question? cause one can take the "ease" right out the window!
3. If the husband is at work, for him it will always be easier regardless of the gender.
4. If the mom is at work it will be harder regardless; apparently men don't have any guilt when dropping a kid in daycare because manners, morals, and common sense usually matter LESS to them.
5. Both genders are easy to raise if money is no object.
6. Where you, the parent, draw the line.

The "easiness" comes from scheduling, setting out boundaries, and teaching manners.
"Kids" are what you make of them. If you value good citizenship, then you will schedule them early, (sleeping, eating, homework, activities, etc), teach them to be good people, practice good manners at all times and so forth, and by doing that you also teach time management. The "ease" comes from good time management. If you don't set out boundaries on time, you won't have a good time.
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:53 AM
 
4,279 posts, read 3,299,570 times
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Please stop stereotyping. It depends largely upon how genders are socialized. My mother was a woman's woman, and I was a tomboy. We had nothing in common and seemed to enjoy making one another miserable. I would bring her bugs, lizards, and frogs as quickly as a bouquet of flowers, even though she always reacted with disgust to what I deemed the more interesting gifts. Before I started school, I spent most of my days in T-shirts and jeans helping my dad in the backyard with the lawn equipment. I've always viewed my dad as a buddy, someone to talk to and love. Our relationship is based on respect and trust.

My mom, on the other hand, never seemed to understand this concept and wanted to try to beat respect for her into me or shame and embarrass me into submission. Of course, I just rebelled more. She seemed much more interested in rules and rituals than in understanding me as a person. It drove me nuts. If I tried to ask her, "why do you want me to put on makeup," or "why do you want me to wear that dress; I'll just get it dirty," she responded with anger and, sometimes with "because I said so!" There was never any real attempt to communicate with me. She looked out for what she deemed as my "physical needs," but I wanted an emotional connection with her that I never got.

I wish I could have gotten a glimpse into the future, though. Fast forward, my mother, the person who truly did try to look out for me like she looked out for herself, is gone. She died of cancer a few years ago. Since then, the world has been a colder scarier place. I now know why my mom tried to get me to put on dresses, wear makeup, and follow the traditional conventions of women; society seems to demand it from us, and women who don't do it have fewer chances for advancement. I got into that stuff, though, without her help. It's the only way I remember her, really.

Dad is still around, and I try to treat him well. He's a little like a mother to me, but he expects a lot more independence from me. He hardly ever helps me unless he thinks I really need it, and he's made it clear that he wants me to have my own life. He's still my buddy, and I still love him so much that I wouldn't know what to do without him. We still talk about almost everything; he's kind of become a second counselor since my mom died. I wish I would have taken my cues from both of them and learned the lessons they tried to teach me. Dad tried to teach me independence, ingenuity, and intellectual curiosity, and my mother tried to teach me conformity, empathy, and "sophistication." Instead, I failed to learn most of their lessons and turned out to be a lot less than what I could have been.

Last edited by krmb; 10-10-2014 at 10:03 AM..
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,114 posts, read 9,347,559 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
Please stop stereotyping. It depends largely upon how genders are socialized. My mother was a woman's woman, and I was a tomboy. We had nothing in common and seemed to enjoy making one another miserable. I would bring her bugs, lizards, and frogs as quickly as a bouquet of flowers, even though she always reacted with disgust to what I deemed the more interesting gifts. Before I started school, I spent most of my days in T-shirts and jeans helping my dad in the backyard with the lawn equipment. I've always viewed my dad as a buddy, someone to talk to and love. Our relationship is based on respect and trust.

My mom, on the other hand, never seemed to understand this concept and wanted to try to beat respect for her into me or shame me into submission. She seemed much more interested in rules and rituals than in understanding me as a person. It drove me nuts. If I tried to ask her, "why do you want me to put on makeup," or "why do you want me to wear that dress; I'll just get it dirty," she responded with anger and, sometimes, "because I said so!" There was never any real attempt to communicate with me. She looked out for what she deemed as my "physical needs," but I was pretty sure that with the survival techniques my dad taught me, I would be able to make it on my own, if I needed to.

I wish I could have gotten a glimpse into the future, though. Fast forward, my mother, the person who truly did try to look out for me like she looked out for herself, is gone. She died of cancer a few years ago. Since then, the world has been a colder scarier place. I now know why my mom tried to get me to put on dresses, wear makeup, and follow the traditional conventions of women; society seems to demand it from us, and women who don't do it have fewer chances for advancement. I got into that stuff, though, without her help. It's the only way I remember her, really.

Dad is still around, and I try to treat him well. He's a little like a mother to me, but he expects a lot more independence from me. He hardly ever helps me just because, and he's made it clear that he has his own life. He's still my buddy, and I still love him so much that I wouldn't know what to do without him. We still talk about almost everything; he's kind of become a second counselor since my mom died. I wish I would have taken my cues from both of them and learned the lessons they tried to teach me. Dad tried to teach me independence and intellectual curiosity, and my mother tried to teach me conformity and "sophistication." Instead, I failed to learn most of their lessons and turned out to be a lot less than what I could have been.
Yes, this is what I'm thinking as well. Stop stereotyping the genders. Each has their own set of "problems" and it's really about individual temparment, NOT their gender. All girls are NOT the same. I have two girls who are polar opposites in terms of personality. They both possess female hardware but one is more "girly" while the other one is decidedly a "tomgirl" who loves wrestling and flying off the bed. BOTH have their challenges but that has a lot to do with their age as well. My "girly" girl is 8, and is approaching puberty, so she tends to be a tad more emotional, whereas my youngest is 3.5 years old and is very physical - more like a little tornado. Love them both, though. If anything, maybe the 8 year old "girly" girl is easier than my little Tasmanian devil..
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:43 AM
 
155 posts, read 212,398 times
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Each human being is an individual , the way we behave is due to the surroundings and the way we have been raised, taught to behave or expected to behave. I see the major concerns here about girls here are girls like to dress up , they want sparkles etc.. Isnt that what our society has taught them from the advertisements they watch , from majority of their loved ones calling them princess etc. When boys behave a certain way they are " Just being boys" . When the same behaviour is seen in a little girl " Oh she is so difficult to handle" .

Point being, if when raising our kids , if we ( me included ) just paid attention to their personalities and loved them for who they are , the gender issue really doesnt come into picture . Surely not till they are teenagers atleast.
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Old 10-10-2014, 11:55 AM
 
1,035 posts, read 1,559,906 times
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Parents are individuals too, so "easy" will also differ depending on what their concerns and values are. One set of parents I know are mega concerned about safety, so they're finding it more difficult to raise their daughter because they don't worry about their son as much as far as getting hurt or not being able to defend himself, etc.

Another set of parents I know are more focused on behavior, so they're finding their son more difficult to raise than their daughter because he's naturally (arguably) more physical and aggressive in his activities, so they're not finding themselves having to deal with their daughter tearing up the place in the same way, roughhousing with friends getting too rough, etc.

Like others said, though, all kids are different. With all the kids I've taken care of, I'd be pressed to say gender even matters short of how you choose to raise your kids according to it. The one obvious thing is sex. It seems parents are often more concerned about or more focused on their daughter getting pregnant than on their son having sex (which leads to daughters getting pregnant lol).

I always make the joke that I'd be more worried about a son because he can spread a whole lot of seed in the nine months your daughter is still dealing with one lol
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:01 PM
 
Location: New Yawk
8,656 posts, read 4,802,146 times
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Yup. My boys are very different: the younger one is very mellow and independent, while the older one has always been a difficult person to live with... occasionally interrupted by a good day. Before kids, I always figured kids were difficult because their parents made that way so it has been incredibly humbling experience.
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Yes, this is what I'm thinking as well. Stop stereotyping the genders. Each has their own set of "problems" and it's really about individual temparment, NOT their gender. All girls are NOT the same. I have two girls who are polar opposites in terms of personality. They both possess female hardware but one is more "girly" while the other one is decidedly a "tomgirl" who loves wrestling and flying off the bed. BOTH have their challenges but that has a lot to do with their age as well. My "girly" girl is 8, and is approaching puberty, so she tends to be a tad more emotional, whereas my youngest is 3.5 years old and is very physical - more like a little tornado. Love them both, though. If anything, maybe the 8 year old "girly" girl is easier than my little Tasmanian devil..
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Northern Minnesota
28,783 posts, read 2,367,648 times
Reputation: 7543
Which gender is easier to raise, girls or boys?

BOYS
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