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Old 10-07-2014, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Not where I want to be
4,827 posts, read 6,935,656 times
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Okay, so when my daughter was little (elementary school age), there were always notices sent home periodically about "please do NOT send your child into school with peanut butter sandwiches or anything containing peanuts. We have a child in the class/school who is severely allergic"

Now, she's been in high school for 3 years and no notices.

I'm sure there won't be any at college.

What happens to the "allergic" children once they become adults??? They are "deathly allergic" to peanuts (or whatever) and cannot be within 1000 feet of a peanut or they will die. So what happens when they grow up and go to work?? Do they post signs at work asking their co-workers not to bring in peanut products? What if they're at a sports bar? (notorious for peanuts) Or if they're on an airplane?

I guess my question is, once you're an adult and the world no longer revolves around you, you can't ask people not to eat or bring in certain items just because you're allergic (I'd love to see someone try to tell someone at a job not to bring in peanuts or tell the building cafeteria to please not serve or have any peanut products!) so what do you do???
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Old 10-07-2014, 06:42 PM
 
Location: here
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You become responsible for yourself, and no longer the responsibility of the school.
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:13 PM
 
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This is probably an ignorant question, but why are nuts/peanuts always singled out? My niece and nephew have severe, lifethreatening anaphylactic reactions to eggs, but I've never seen a classroom labeled "egg free." "Nut free," however, is all over the place. Do peanut particles fly through the air in a way that other foodstuffs do not?

In answer to the OP's question, most likely the majority of nut-allergic people are not SO allergic that they can't be in the same room with a peanut. But past elementary school, they're old enough to be cautious about what they eat, and to monitor themselves for allergic reactions. I do get why the elementary schools are extra careful with allergies, because little kids are--well, little kids, who might be tempted to take a bite of someone else's food, or touch something and not wash their hands, etc. But not really why they're super careful with nuts, and not so much with other allergens.
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Old 10-07-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
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Tree nuts, peanuts, and shell fish elicit the most severe allergies, and result in the highest number of deaths of all the food allergies. That being said food allergies are a reaction to the protein which must be ingested.

The true instance of anaphylaxis following inhalation of peanut particles is miniscule, if at all, and certainly doesn't warrant the "sanitize the whole world" mentality. The majority of patients with severe peanut allergies don't have anaphylaxis if they inhale particles or fumes, but rather asthma.

Peanut Allergy | Food Allergies | ACAAI

Quote:
Is inhaling peanut allergens risky?

An allergic reaction to peanut is triggered by contact with peanut protein. While there are case reports involving the onset of symptoms such as skin rashes or chest tightness from being in the presence of or smelling peanut
butter, a blind, placebo-controlled trial of children exposed to open peanut butter documented no systemic reactions.

However, food particles containing proteins can become airborne. This might occur, for example, during grinding or pulverization of peanuts that disperses particles in the air. Inhaling peanut protein in this type of situation could
cause an allergic reaction, but usually not anaphylaxis. Odors may cause conditioned physiologic responses such as a skin rash or change in blood pressure.
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Old 10-08-2014, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Eastern PA
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I just went for a tour of my old high school for our 25th reunion. On the door of many of the classrooms, there were "Nut Free Zone" signs. There is a neighboring district that is completely nut free in all of its schools, from elementary on up.
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Old 10-08-2014, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Finland
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As pointed out, younger children maybe aren't so good at policing themselves from tasting other people's foods. Also children can outgrow allergies (not sure if that's the case for nut allergies but I know it is for some others) so maybe there are less that are allergic once in high school and beyond.

I don't know, never heard of nut-free zones here but children don't take their own food to school anyway so probably not an issue here.
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Old 10-08-2014, 02:27 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
4,294 posts, read 2,883,322 times
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Quote:
Okay, so when my daughter was little (elementary school age), there were always notices sent home periodically about "please do NOT send your child into school with peanut butter sandwiches or anything containing peanuts. We have a child in the class/school who is severely allergic"

Now, she's been in high school for 3 years and no notices.

I'm sure there won't be any at college.

What happens to the "allergic" children once they become adults???
I was surprised that when I realized that you don't know the difference between an elementary class kid and your self.
Well the reason school send the flyers because they are KIDS and they have very less knowledge about what they are allergic and as kids they can take a bite from other kids and it can cause death due to breathing problem. Severely allergy mean it is attached to Asthma in some way. children who allergic become adults some are possible not to allergic any more and also as they are grown ups they know very well to ignore and stay away from the food or the items that they are allergic for.That is what happen when they grow up.

Quote:
They are "deathly allergic" to peanuts (or whatever) and cannot be within 1000 feet of a peanut or they will die. So what happens when they grow up and go to work?? Do they post signs at work asking their co-workers not to bring in peanut products? What if they're at a sports bar? (notorious for peanuts) Or if they're on an airplane?
And yes it is deathly allergic and it can cause death. My daughter severely allergic child to peanut and she cannot breath in the class room when some one come with peanut butter. and she gets skin reactions and short breath and falling down with in 20, 30 minutes, you know there are people that who thinks that there kids will be dead due to ignoring peanut butter peanut talk powder just for few hours at school so this child also suffering due to that most of the time. I have written what happens when they grow up with my para above.. At the age 15 there will be a allergy screening test again and if the situation does not change she will get a government health commission authorized letter with that she can request if the air line carrying peanuts. There are many air lines who concern about allergic people too. Here in sports bars wont sell any peanuts.
If some one visits me I ask them not to bring any thing included peanuts or peanut butter . If they don't like it they can stop visiting me , my child is more important than the people who thinks nothing but their peanut. And most of the places nuts free now days. And if there are nuts it will displayed clearly.

Quote:
I guess my question is, once you're an adult and the world no longer revolves around you, you can't ask people not to eat or bring in certain items just because you're allergic (I'd love to see someone try to tell someone at a job not to bring in peanuts or tell the building cafeteria to please not serve or have any peanut products!) so what do you do???
Of course I can ask if they visit my home. And if I am allergic I will ask not to bring to my office too. very few percentage of people like you exist so nothing to worry peanut allergy people will live. Of course here cafeteria need to get QC passed for serving non allergic food.
I think you better read the information about peanut allergies.
When foods can kill a child - Telegraph
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Old 10-08-2014, 04:33 AM
 
15,758 posts, read 13,184,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amisi View Post
Okay, so when my daughter was little (elementary school age), there were always notices sent home periodically about "please do NOT send your child into school with peanut butter sandwiches or anything containing peanuts. We have a child in the class/school who is severely allergic"

Now, she's been in high school for 3 years and no notices.

I'm sure there won't be any at college.

What happens to the "allergic" children once they become adults??? They are "deathly allergic" to peanuts (or whatever) and cannot be within 1000 feet of a peanut or they will die. So what happens when they grow up and go to work?? Do they post signs at work asking their co-workers not to bring in peanut products? What if they're at a sports bar? (notorious for peanuts) Or if they're on an airplane?

I guess my question is, once you're an adult and the world no longer revolves around you, you can't ask people not to eat or bring in certain items just because you're allergic (I'd love to see someone try to tell someone at a job not to bring in peanuts or tell the building cafeteria to please not serve or have any peanut products!) so what do you do???
Several things

1. Most allergies, especially ones of this type become less severe over time.

2. The person in danger becomes able to immediately self administer life saving medication I.e. Epipen. Yes, young children may carry them, but due to their young age are much less likely to maintain the composure and self awareness while going into anaphylactic shock to remember how to properly save themselves than an adult would.

3. They mature and learn how to identify situations which might bring on a reaction as do their peers. For example, small school aged children frequently forget to wash their hands after eating sticky foods like peanut butter and then proceed to touch a variety of surfaces which could then be dangerous to other small children and we are back to problem 2. Adults and teens rarely need to be reminded to wash gobs of peanut butter off their hands.
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Old 10-08-2014, 04:37 AM
 
15,758 posts, read 13,184,034 times
Reputation: 19646
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
This is probably an ignorant question, but why are nuts/peanuts always singled out? My niece and nephew have severe, lifethreatening anaphylactic reactions to eggs, but I've never seen a classroom labeled "egg free." "Nut free," however, is all over the place. Do peanut particles fly through the air in a way that other foodstuffs do not?

In answer to the OP's question, most likely the majority of nut-allergic people are not SO allergic that they can't be in the same room with a peanut. But past elementary school, they're old enough to be cautious about what they eat, and to monitor themselves for allergic reactions. I do get why the elementary schools are extra careful with allergies, because little kids are--well, little kids, who might be tempted to take a bite of someone else's food, or touch something and not wash their hands, etc. But not really why they're super careful with nuts, and not so much with other allergens.
Through the air? No. But the oily, and sticky nature of peanuts in particular, makes it much more likely for one little child to have a blob of peanut butter in their hands, touch a table, and the next allergic kid touch the table, then eat and inject the gob and bam, anaphylaxis. That is a scenario that is much more likely to happen in an oily food like peanut butter then in eggs.
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Old 10-08-2014, 06:50 AM
 
530 posts, read 959,904 times
Reputation: 1134
My daughter is severely allergic to milk, and it seemed like she lived in the nurse's office in kindergarten and first grade because of the other kids. A kid would eat pizza and touch her, and my daughter would break out in hives and have to go to the nurse. Her old school did not do as good of a job of cleaning the tables between kids, which also led to problems since young kids are messy. Plus only in grade school did she have a kid try to shove an ice cream cone in her face because he thought he was being funny. Finally in grade school they had snack time which led to food particles being in the classroom.

My dd is now in high school, and many things change by this age. The students only eat in the cafeteria. Her fellow students don't tend to walk around with messy hands and fingers. They don't try to grab her as much. They also don't try to shove things in her face. She carries her own epinephrine shot. Fortunately maturity brings changes!
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