U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-11-2009, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Rocket City, U.S.A.
1,806 posts, read 4,995,133 times
Reputation: 843

Advertisements

What happened to the specific State laws concerning the harboring of a minor?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-11-2009, 12:42 PM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,467,232 times
Reputation: 1288
Quote:
Originally Posted by 33458 View Post
What happened to the specific State laws concerning the harboring of a minor?
RCW 13.32A.080: Unlawful harboring of a minor — Penalty — Defense — Prosecution of adult for involving child in commission of offense.

According to this link, it is only illegal to harbor a teen under certain conditions in Washington. I'm sure things are similar in other states.

Since the police won't intervene, the mother really doesn't have many choices than to maybe talk to an attorney.

It may be better all the way around to wait it out. That host family will get tired of supporting her (presuming they are not well off) sooner or later and she will have no other choice than to go back home. If the mother further alienates the daughter, the chances of her going to parts unknown are greater than had she just let things take their natural course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 06:59 PM
 
7 posts, read 28,888 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevK View Post
Surprisingly the cops say that there is nothing they can do or want to do! Here is what happened- the 16 year old girl ran away from home and went to a friend's house almost 2 months ago. Amazingly the friend's parents told the girl that she could stay there as long as she wanted provided she goes to school and stays out of trouble WITHOUT asking the girl's mother if she could stay there!! And if that is not amazing enough the girl's mother called the COPS and they told her NO laws were being broken! They said that it is a civil matter and that the mother would have to go to Juvenile Court and file a petition to have the girl declared "wayward" before she could be removed from the friend's house against her will! The mother declined to do so and the girl is still at the friend's house. Kids have alot more rights now I guess. When I was 16, the cops would have grabbed that girl by the scruff and kicked her ass all the way back home!
What the hell are you thinking? Do you know why the girl left home in the first place? I left home and lived with a friend and her parents when I was sixteen. I was WAY better off then at home. AND yes kids do have more rights now...thank God! With people like you on the loose, who think that they should be "grabbed by the scruff," and "have their ass kicked all the way home," they need the protection.

I feel sorry for people like you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,969 posts, read 13,768,384 times
Reputation: 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by 33458 View Post
What happened to the specific State laws concerning the harboring of a minor?
We still have one here. Not under "limited circumstances" as stormy described. Ours covers any situation where you harbor a minor for more than 24 hours without informing the police or the minor's parents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: NE Oklahoma
1,036 posts, read 2,579,386 times
Reputation: 1080
I posted about this on another thread..... i will copy it.
My daughter and I have issues too.
She informed me Tuesday that she was gonna hurt me when I told her she couldn't have a sandwich. We were 1 hour from going out to eat dinner. Ummm I defended myself.. and when the police got there, I had her held down to the ground by her hair. The next day I had bruises. I don't do that... I will not tolerate that sort of behavior.
Wednesday I took her to her father's house. She has wanted to live with her father for years. The grass is always greener...of course. We have been divorced for 8 years. I have been remarried for 5. Needless to say she thinks Mark hates her. No one hates her but we do have boundaries and rules for behavior in our home. She doesn't want to follow any rules.
Also she is bipolar and refuses medication, testing, or counseling. I don't know what I am going to do if my ex husband don't keep her. Their situation is wonderful. His GIRLFRIEND that he lives with is working on their RD child together... She has 2 older boys (16 and 9) from her HUSBAND that she isn't divorced from..yet.. after 5 years of them together. The Girlfriend graduated from the Th grade, education isn't important to her in the least. She "home schools" her two older boys but they have no formal education to say the least. The older one is 16 and can't read a box of cereal. Maybe he is learning other things..I don't know. I would think reading is important though. Kinda scares me about what this will mean for my daughters education, she is finishing Th grade right now. The thing is..I have accepted there isn't anything I can do about it. I won't tolerate the violent behavior just to get her way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 09:58 PM
 
515 posts, read 1,148,048 times
Reputation: 329
Sounds like a pretty unruly kid. I say let her spend time over there for now until she realizes she'll have rules no matter where she is living.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2009, 10:13 PM
 
Location: NE Florida
9,362 posts, read 22,343,312 times
Reputation: 9263
If the girl is doing well, this might be a good place for her to be right now. I think I would contact the local Safe Place program and see what counseling services are available. My mom and I were like oil and water when I was a teen and having another place to be for a while could have been a big help to me. Counseling would have been good, too, but in counseling, sometimes parents learn that they may be part of the problem and are not open to considering that.

National Safe Place - Where Kids Get Help...FAST
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2009, 05:45 AM
 
1,577 posts, read 3,266,979 times
Reputation: 530
In many parts of the world, 16 is a legal adult age.

Also in the USA, it is uncommonly known that kids can legally drop out of school at 16. 16 is seen as close enough to adult age, that the police really don't worry about it. There's all these legal loopholes that many people aren't aware of. 18 isn't the magic age, its actually 16, but we just don't tell the kids about it or they'd ALL leave and ALL quit school if they knew they could.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2009, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,969 posts, read 13,768,384 times
Reputation: 4539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackyfrost01 View Post
In many parts of the world, 16 is a legal adult age.

Also in the USA, it is uncommonly known that kids can legally drop out of school at 16. 16 is seen as close enough to adult age, that the police really don't worry about it. There's all these legal loopholes that many people aren't aware of. 18 isn't the magic age, its actually 16, but we just don't tell the kids about it or they'd ALL leave and ALL quit school if they knew they could.
No. In some states, they can drop out at 16. In others, they have to wait until 17 or 18. Here, they have to wait until the end of the school year during which they turn 18...they can't even drop out on their 18th birthday.

These legal loopholes exist because the age at which a child is considered an adult for criminal purposes may be different. Here, it's 17. 16 is the maximum age to go to juvie. 17 year olds are taken to adult jail, adult court, get put on adult probation, go to adult prison, etc.

It does NOT mean that a 17 year old can drop out of school, sign contracts, etc. What it does do is create a gray area for 17 year old runaways. They CAN be picked up by the police and returned to their parents, but there is nothing a court can do about it. If they were 16, they could also be put on juvenile probation, put in a group home, etc. The harboring a minor laws, however, apply with respect to minors under 18.

That said, in something like 35-40 states, the criminal adult age is also 18, so this gray area does not exist.

Last edited by afoigrokerkok; 04-12-2009 at 06:54 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2009, 10:04 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,490 posts, read 13,349,016 times
Reputation: 19916
Those gray areas have been around for a long time. Too old to be legally considered a juvenile but not legally adult either.
Years ago I left home at 16 and went to a 'safe house', where they attempted family counseling, blah, blah. I had an offer to move in with a friends family and stay until graduation a year and a half away. The folks at the halfway house basically told my mother that as long as I was safe, not on the streets, and going to school that the police and the court system would not get involved as I could not be considered a runaway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top