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Old 12-22-2015, 02:04 PM
 
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Coming from down south, I would be concerned that they were employing people who they were able to pay less...because in the southern states there is that dynamic. I wouldn't say that would mean they would get lesser care, by any means. I think most Hispanic cultures are very nurturing to children, at least in my experience.

But I would wonder if there was something shady going on. Especially if the local population of Hispanics is 5%. Are they taking advantage of immigrant populations, would be my concern.

My second thought is is there nepotism? Perhaps they are hiring friends and family of one employee. That would bother me. I would be concerned they would be slow to fire or report someone as incompetent. Or even that outside drama would come into the school.

With the situation , I would question it. And I say go with your gut when it comes to finding a school for your child.

PS my kids are Hispanic, pretty sure I'm not racist.
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:09 PM
 
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At that age (2) I am more concerned about the stability and longevity of the staff rather than race or language. If they are all Hispanic but have all been there for years and most rooms have the generally the same teachers for at least, what, a year at a time, then I would be okay with that. The main problems we have had with daycares is when my young toddler, for whom caregiver attachment is extremely important, goes through 3 teachers in a month.

So are they all Hispanic because they've all been there forever and have established a tight-knit family at the daycare? That's good.

Or are they all Hispanic because they are willing to take lower pay but it's a constant revolving door with the staff looking for higher paying positions? That's bad.

Another way you can tell if a daycare is any good - do the teachers have their own kids there? If they do, then they trust their fellow teachers, and they get good benefits and are likely to stick around. If all of the teachers kids' are being watched by grandmas? Look elsewhere.
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
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Bethesda is a very expensive place to live. Day care workers do not get paid very well. Put those two facts together, and what you're going to get is a staff made up of people who live where they can afford to live and endure a long commute to get to their jobs. This is probably why the staff is all Hispanic (there are a lot of low-wage Hispanics in Montgomery County, but most of them live on the other side of the county from where you're looking) and also probably why they close when there's a little snow.

In the day care where my kids went, most of the workers lived in the immediate area. There was a good mix of black and white and a few Asian caregivers (I don't recall any Hispanic ones, though it's been awhile); turnover was fairly low for that type of job; and they almost never closed for snow. It worked great for us.

To me, staff diversity is not a big deal. But I'm not you. If that's something that's important to you, look elsewhere. The real kicker for me would be the snow closings.

And by the way, the fact that the staff is low-paid but tuition is high is not necessarily a sign of greedy management. If this day care is located in central Bethesda, their rents are probably sky-high; so they have to overcharge their clients and underpay their workers to compensate for it. You might do better if you find a place in a less built-up area.
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Having staff all the same race isn't an issue (I mean, they're all the same race in my kid's daycare, not much chance of them not being!) but when it might be because they want to pay lower wages then its getting dodgy, which it might be seeing as its not representative of your area. But closing for tiny amounts of snow has to be a deal breaker - what will you do about work if they close over a little snow?! Keep looking for somewhere else.
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UserName14289 View Post
I realize this is an unusual question, and please know that it is not a racist question. I am far from racist (I am Greek, my best friend is Asian, my ex-hb is black, and my son is half black), but I was struck by the feeling I got touring a particular pre-school. It took me a bit to put my finger on it, then I realized what it was: the entire staff, aside from the white director, was hispanic.

Now, keep in mind, this is not in SoCal where I used to live and in some areas whites are the minority and billboards are in Spanish. This was in Bethesda where the racial makeup is only 5.43% hispanic or latino.

Something the director said when I toured about their snow policy (which sounded excessive to me compared to our current school and others I've toured), is that they frequently close for even small amounts of snow "because their staff doesn't live in the immediate area and most have lengthy commutes" -- no mention of the kids, so another alert went up for me.

Then I got to thinking, especially given their lengthy commute, what are the odds that the *entire* staff, aside from the director, would be Hispanic? This is a fairly large pre-k, afterall. They have three classes just for the '2s' alone.

Would you be put off if the entire staff was one race? It doesn't seem to bother my cousin so her daughter goes there, and given it's ideal location (it really couldn't be any more convenient) and that his cousin goes there (they are 2 weeks apart so they'd possibly be in the same class), I'd love to consider this pre-school, however, as hard as I try, I can't seem to get past my hesitation about the lack of diversity in the staff.

I need to give someone a deposit to secure a spot for my son at a preschool (we LOVE our current school, but can't take it with us), but can't until I pick one. :|
Hispanic isn't really a race.

I would be concerned about whether it was a good fit for your child not the ethnic makeup of the staff.
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Old 12-22-2015, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Texas
599 posts, read 478,804 times
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I love all the "I am not a racist" disclaimers. You can be a nonracist and still have racial bias. I would think it is very hard to escape this living in america.

Your original question is would I be bothered if an entire staff say for a few are one race. No.

For the majority of non-whites who live in suburbia, that is the norm. My kids' preschool and elementary school have staff that is all white. I would think generally that is the case for most in suburbia. So, your question is really would you be bothered if the entire staff is nonwhite. And my answer is still no. Actually I would be overjoyed if my daughter finished preschool and could speak fluent spanish. We have a Spanish speaking preschool in my uper middle class town; it has a waiting list so long that people actually camp out to get their kids enrolled there. The majority of the staff is hispanic. Maybe that is why they have an all Hispanic staff - because they tout that they teach in spanish.
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Old 12-22-2015, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Maryland
912 posts, read 595,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Bethesda is a very expensive place to live. Day care workers do not get paid very well. Put those two facts together, and what you're going to get is a staff made up of people who live where they can afford to live and endure a long commute to get to their jobs. This is probably why the staff is all Hispanic (there are a lot of low-wage Hispanics in Montgomery County, but most of them live on the other side of the county from where you're looking) and also probably why they close when there's a little snow.

In the day care where my kids went, most of the workers lived in the immediate area. There was a good mix of black and white and a few Asian caregivers (I don't recall any Hispanic ones, though it's been awhile); turnover was fairly low for that type of job; and they almost never closed for snow. It worked great for us.

To me, staff diversity is not a big deal. But I'm not you. If that's something that's important to you, look elsewhere. The real kicker for me would be the snow closings.

And by the way, the fact that the staff is low-paid but tuition is high is not necessarily a sign of greedy management. If this day care is located in central Bethesda, their rents are probably sky-high; so they have to overcharge their clients and underpay their workers to compensate for it. You might do better if you find a place in a less built-up area.
Good points.

I would normally agree about the cost of staff vs rent, but none of the other schools I toured in the same same area are similarly staffed. In fact, this place is in the "cheaper" end of Bethesda, if there is such a thing (bordering Rockville, but it is a great location to the major roads to get to most of the employers I'm considering) compared to the other places I toured, so their financial overhead should be lower than further south closer to Whitman.
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Old 12-22-2015, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Maryland
912 posts, read 595,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
Hispanic isn't really a race.

I would be concerned about whether it was a good fit for your child not the ethnic makeup of the staff.
I knew someone would say that. If you are looking at the demographics of an area, it is referred to as race. Let's not get hung up on semantics.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethes...d#Demographics
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Old 12-22-2015, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Maryland
912 posts, read 595,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayerdu View Post
I love all the "I am not a racist" disclaimers. You can be a nonracist and still have racial bias. I would think it is very hard to escape this living in america.

Your original question is would I be bothered if an entire staff say for a few are one race. No.

For the majority of non-whites who live in suburbia, that is the norm. My kids' preschool and elementary school have staff that is all white. I would think generally that is the case for most in suburbia. So, your question is really would you be bothered if the entire staff is nonwhite. And my answer is still no. Actually I would be overjoyed if my daughter finished preschool and could speak fluent spanish. We have a Spanish speaking preschool in my uper middle class town; it has a waiting list so long that people actually camp out to get their kids enrolled there. The majority of the staff is hispanic. Maybe that is why they have an all Hispanic staff - because they tout that they teach in spanish.
See, all white concerns me too. One of the largest reasons I disliked living in Carlsbad was that it was ALL white. It literally has 1% black population.

I don't think it's an issue of all Hispanic. In this particular situation, it's just unusual for this neighborhood and considering all the other schools.

Another school which I adore but is the opposite direction from the way I'd be driving to work, on staff the day I toured I saw Hispanic, Asian, Caucasian, African American, Indian, and Middle Eastern teachers. I mean, we're talking just a couple miles outside the DC border. If there isn't diversity in your school here, where will there be?
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Old 12-22-2015, 03:43 PM
 
12,939 posts, read 19,867,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UserName14289 View Post
That was one of my concerns about their wages (and this is *not* a cheap school, which is even more concerning). Monthly tuition is more than my first mortgage.

Yes, my son is almost 2.

He also has a speech delay. They boast teaching Spanish, but at 2, I want his focus to be on English. I was raised bilingual Greek and English and find it confusing for some children. I can't imagine how confusing it must be for a child with a speech delay.

Also, many people on the staff had thick accents and some less than ideal English since it's obviously their second language.

What I love about our current school is that it is extremely highly rated by the MD Dept. of Education, and that all their main pre-k teachers have a bachelor's or higher in a related field. Teacher assistants have at least their 90-certs. My cousin argues at this age, a degree is not important. She wants her daughter to feel safe and nurtured. To me, a degree says this is my chosen field, this is a career, a passion -- not something for extra cash or to get a Visa.

I also asked about their kindergarten preparedness rates, and got the answer, "well, a few students are reading by kindergarten" (I didn't specially ask about reading). At our current school, all kids are reading before kindergarten. I do not want my son struggling in kindergarten because he was not adequately prepared. Oh, and our current school costs $600/mo less.
Are you leaving your current school because you've moved? I'm not sure if you made that clear or not.

The ability to speak clear English can be an issue. My son also had a speech delay, although the doctors told me at 2 it was too early to be concerned. He ended up with an IEP all through his schooling, including college. One thing his IEP specified, was that he have native English speaking teachers. Not because I insisted, but because it was deemed important by the child study team.
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