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Old 12-28-2015, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,487 posts, read 6,426,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Honey also shouldn't be used in small children.
Honey should not be given to infants under 1 year of age. Clostridium bacteria, which causes botulism, is naturally found in the environment and can be found in/on foods/produce grown outdoors, including honey.

Unlike those who are older, a less than 1 year old infant's immune system is not sufficiently developed and cannot protect against this bacteria/spores. Most children older than 1 year and adults can handle this issue without problems (except in cases of canning, particularly home grown produce and damaged commercial canned goods, where errors are made and the bacteria thrive and flourish to such an extent that they can overcome *any* immune system).

While children under 1 year typically cannot consume raw produce***, because they can't chew it, honey is one of the items that a child this young *could* consume, thus it carries the warning.

***(Obviously, raw produce put through a food processor/juicer could possibly be given to an infant, but this is probably relatively rare.)
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Old 12-28-2015, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,487 posts, read 6,426,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
^^That is still way below the boiling point of water-212 at sea level; 202 here in metro Denver.
True, and I thought it was fairly obvious that I was not debating the boiling point of water, at any altitude. I was merely correcting the inaccurate and potentially deadly information about setting a water heater to 120*. It is not impossible to conceive that there might be some people reading this board that, in the interest of saving money, might be stupid/ignorant enough to actually set their water heaters that low.
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Old 12-28-2015, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Florida
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I thought it was basic safety knowledge that water heaters should be set at 120 if you have young children in the house. I have no idea what mine is set at, but my kids are teens. Interesting info about the Legionnaire's Disease.

Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department of Energy
Burn safety: Protect your child from burns - Mayo Clinic
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:21 AM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,492,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natsku View Post
In regards to using ibuprofen for helping with colds - it helps with any aches and pains and reduces fever but its not really going to help with inflammation of the airways Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the common cold | Cochrane and here is doctor information regarding treating a cold, scroll down to the bit about NSAIDs Upper Respiratory Infections

Also to add in, NSAIDs can trigger asthma attacks in asthmatics, which will make airway inflammation a whole lot worse.

Edit: The second article also mentions that a Cochrane review has shown that zinc, when taken within the first 24 hours of a cold, does reduce duration and severity of the cold in healthy people but can also produce side-effects and there are no firm recommendations for dosage etc. yet.

Edit: Hell, lets stick in another link supporting the fact that ibuprofen isn't going to ease coughs etc. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the common cold. - PubMed - NCBI Katarina Witt is absolutely right about this, as she generally is when it comes to medical matters that she comments on. She knows her stuff.
It won't ease coughs. Few things do. But it can ease a sore throat, and other symptoms of a cold.
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
True, and I thought it was fairly obvious that I was not debating the boiling point of water, at any altitude. I was merely correcting the inaccurate and potentially deadly information about setting a water heater to 120*. It is not impossible to conceive that there might be some people reading this board that, in the interest of saving money, might be stupid/ignorant enough to actually set their water heaters that low.
Well, the discussion was about using boiling water or steaming up the bathroom from the shower. My husband tested ours and it was 135 at the kitchen sink. Lots of people tell us ours runs hot.
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
It won't ease coughs. Few things do. But it can ease a sore throat, and other symptoms of a cold.
You claimed it does ease coughing by helping with inflammation though.
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:57 AM
 
Location: here
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
No.

Water heaters, particularly *electric* water heaters, should not be set lower than 140*F. Water heaters with temperatures set too low are conducive to the growth of some bacteria, and of particular concern, the bacteria that causes Legionnaire's Disease. These bacteria are known to be present in some municipal water systems (according to NIH, about 40% of cases transmitted by public water supplies). A temperature of 120* is just lovely for these bacteria and provides a nearly optimal growth environment. Breathing the steam in which these bacteria are present can result in infection, and is particularly dangerous to children and the elderly (as well as others with compromised immune systems).

Due to the design (heating elements in the side of the tank, above the bottom), electric water heaters are more susceptible to this problem. Heaters fired by gas or No.2 fuel oil are less susceptible for two reasons- the way the water is heated (at the bottom of the tank) and the fact that, during heating, the temperature in the tank will typically rise higher than the set temperature.

In some areas, laws/regulations are [in the process of] being enacted to require that manufacturers of some water heaters design the controls in order to prevent them from being set lower than (about) 140*F.
I just temped the water at our kitchen sink, and it was 137F and was too hot to touch. We kept it considerably cooler when the kids were younger.

In a child care setting, sinks where the kids wash their hands are not allowed to be over 120F, so it isn't at all off base to think that homes with young kids should keep theirs around that temp also.

From what I'm reading, Legionnaire's grows in stagnant water 68-122F, and best at 90-105F, so keeping the water heater at 140 isn't necessary. I also wouldn't think that normal use would allow the water to stagnate long enough for it to grow much.
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:06 AM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,492,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natsku View Post
You claimed it does ease coughing by helping with inflammation though.
I claimed very little helped with cough, besides narcotics which aren't given often. If there is swelling in the throat which causes the cough, it can help a little.

There are many causes of a cough. Very little helps with coughs. But if you can treat the cause of the cough (i.e. asthma, post nasal drip) you can help ease a cough. But again, not much helps with coughs.
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
I claimed very little helped with cough, besides narcotics which aren't given often. If there is swelling in the throat which causes the cough, it can help a little.

There are many causes of a cough. Very little helps with coughs. But if you can treat the cause of the cough (i.e. asthma, post nasal drip) you can help ease a cough. But again, not much helps with coughs.
This is what you wrote
Quote:
Ibuprofen can help with sneezing, coughing, sinus pressure and runny nose by reducing inflammation.
you also wrote on another post that has since been deleted that ibuprofen can reduce the inflammation in upper respiratory tract. But I'm sure you realise now that it does not do that.
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
I just temped the water at our kitchen sink, and it was 137F and was too hot to touch. We kept it considerably cooler when the kids were younger.

In a child care setting, sinks where the kids wash their hands are not allowed to be over 120F, so it isn't at all off base to think that homes with young kids should keep theirs around that temp also.

From what I'm reading, Legionnaire's grows in stagnant water 68-122F, and best at 90-105F, so keeping the water heater at 140 isn't necessary. I also wouldn't think that normal use would allow the water to stagnate long enough for it to grow much.
We have little buttons on our taps here that you have to press while turning the mixer tap get the water hot, otherwise its just lukewarm. That stops kids accidentally scalding themselves (also meant I took lukewarm showers for several months after moving here before I realised what that button did!)
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