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Old 01-07-2016, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Austin
7,077 posts, read 16,889,211 times
Reputation: 9484

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodburyWoody View Post
(counting out, crushing the pill and adding it to water)
Crushing? All the different doses I found were all dissolvable, so they were barely even chewable.
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Old 01-07-2016, 08:03 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 606,699 times
Reputation: 1730
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbab5 View Post
That's how my parents treated it. As long as I was quiet and in my room, they left it alone. That's what they thought was the right thing to do. Created lots and lots of problems for me, affected my grades in high school, my health in college and as an adult. Now that I am an adult and have google and access to my own doctors I know how to use natural remedies and medication when necessary to help, and it has vastly improved my quality of life.


Bonnie Jean's solution is what is best for the PARENT, but not what is best for the CHILD. It depends on where your priorities lay.
Blame the Parents


what did they do


hold you at gunpoint with matchsticks in your eyelids


Or try to get you to bed (they provided one, after all) and fail to Fight WWIII every night?


You had a CHOICE you know


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Old 01-07-2016, 08:04 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 606,699 times
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oh yeah teach the kid to pop a pill that's much better parenting


LOL
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Old 01-07-2016, 08:06 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 606,699 times
Reputation: 1730
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbab5 View Post
That's how my parents treated it. As long as I was quiet and in my room, they left it alone. That's what they thought was the right thing to do. Created lots and lots of problems for me, affected my grades in high school, my health in college and as an adult. Now that I am an adult and have google and access to my own doctors I know how to use natural remedies and medication when necessary to help, and it has vastly improved my quality of life.


Bonnie Jean's solution is what is best for the PARENT, but not what is best for the CHILD. It depends on where your priorities lay.


A parents job is to teach a child to be an adult


Being an adult includes monitoring your own sleep


apparently yours failed at this but I didn't


also a lot of families will have one child disrupting the rest which is not feasible


Nor is lying down with that child like a breathing binky past diapers


Children have to be taught to


1. Self care and
2. consider others
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Old 01-07-2016, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
5,281 posts, read 4,562,922 times
Reputation: 13274
I feel your pain. Dear lord, I went through the same thing with my youngest. From INFANCY she was not interested in sleeping. Rarely had much of a nap. Never wanted to sleep. She was quiet, I would read to her for HOURS, rock for hours, just not sleepy. I remember rocking her and watching ER and if i was lucky she fell asleep before it was over. I was exhausted!!!! (Her sister was not much of a sleeper either, but she decided to put herself to bed with no fuss when she was 5. She is very type A.)

Crying it out wasn't an option. It just didn't work. Who can sleep when they are jumping up and down in their crib screaming for 3 hours? (not for her sister, either, they were just so ticked off they wouldn't sleep) As she got older she didn't bother to cry. When she was 3ish I remember putting her to bed and leaving the room, her flinging her legs at the wall repeatedly for a couple of hours! I tried EVERYTHING i could find, but I did not hear about melatonin.

Eventually I just caved completely and laid in the bed with her, spooning her, and rubbing her thigh until I fell asleep. I'd have to stay there a good hour before she was deep enough for me to sneak out. Then she would wake up at 3 am and come trotting into my bed. I finally decided my sleep was being disrupted twice for little reason, and just put her in my bed so we would both sleep through the night. She slept in my bed until she was 11! Finally just shamed herself out of it when she went to middle school. She just could not settle down to sleep!

She is now 15. It's better, but not much. She has to get up at 6 for school and is frequently up until midnight. She takes melatonin sometimes when she thinks of it. Last night she was hysterical from PMS. she was sobbing and shaky (I'm sure she was overtired in addition to her hormones) I tried to take her temp bc she was so hot but the thermometer was broken. I laid in bed with her for the first time in 4 years and told her the story I used to tell her to bore her to sleep:

Once upon a time there was a very tired, very sleepy giraffe who was so tired and sleepy she couldn't go to sleep. So she said Momma giraffe, can you please tell me story? Of course, said momma giraffe.
Once upon a time there was a very tired, very sleepy unicorn who was so tired and sleepy she couldn't go to sleep. So she said Momma unicorn, can you please tell me story? Of course, said momma unicorn.
Once upon a time there was a very tired, very sleepy bluebird who was so tired and sleepy she couldn't go to sleep. So she said Momma bluebird, can you please tell me story? Of course, said momma bluebird........
etc, etc, etc......

Then she fell asleep, and when I got up to leave, I dropped the thermometer/case and woke her up. Then I read to her a synopsis of All Quiet on the Western Front because she had a quiz this week and hadn't done the reading. Read through it twice, then she finally felt relaxed enough to let me leave. It took me right back to age 4!!!!

to the OP, try the melatonin, and don't bother putting her to bed so early. If she falls asleep at 11, put her to bed at 10:30 with the routine you are used to. If she can fall asleep consistently enough, then maybe you can edge it forward. But IMHO if you are spending 3 hours on a 'routine', you are wasting everyone's time.

If it is any consolation, I have heard many times that children who don't sleep tend to be gifted. Both mine are!
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Old 01-08-2016, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
Reputation: 10153
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Not too young at all. I started teaching my kids when they were 3/4. By 6, my son could full blow meditate for fairly long periods of time. They just need to be able to understand what you are asking...so good receptive language skills is very helpful. But in a big way, they will mimic you.

Since your child is young try just working on controlled breathing. Have them get into a calm place (bed is good) and try to create a calmness in yourself. Show them that you are breathing slow and have them breath with you (in 1, 2, 3, 4, out 1, 2, 3, 4) You don't have to time it out loud, but thats the way to count it. Just start there.

Another thing I did at that age was making their body heavy. They got what I was talking about after not too long. At a quiet time, hold them in your lap or their head on your lap and start with the breathing a minute. Ask them to make their arm feel heavy. When you see them relax it, let them know that is what you meant. Good job...now make your other arm heavy. Go on from there. And I also relaxed along with them.

The sound of ohm is actually quite relaxing. It can help a kid with an active brain clear it out.

I have heard wonderful things about weighted blankets. They are usually used for people with sensory issues, but read a study on it and it said people (even adults) sleep much better with one. It makes sense to me. I think light pressure is helpful for many people at sleep. When my daughter has trouble sleeping (not really insomnia, just usual kid stuff), she wraps herself into a burrito and thinks calm and happy thoughts (we brain stormed a list of things that are pleasant but not exciting...like not thinking about christmas or disney world, but plays with her toys in her head or remembers a story someone read to her).

My son says classical music is very helpful to him so he often turns it on. He even has a few favorite CDs. He likes Satie in piano a lot. Its funny, he has trained himself. He falls asleep to it at times he doesn't mean to, like when he went to the opera and ballet. I can't play it in the car or he will start to doze off.

Its been a really long struggle. If he stays up all night he misses school the next day. Ive tried to take him but he will pass out cold in class and they call me to come get it. He has been pretty good about not getting up lately, But he can still stay up the whole night for no known reason. I try really hard to keep sleep hygiene up and all our bedtime routines. Its harder now that he is a tween.

Also because I know he isn't doing it on purpose, I do let him read when he can't sleep. There is nothing worse then laying there endlessly all night. Boy do I know! Its paid off, he is reading 2+ years above his grade level. Almost positive its from all that extra bedtime reading. The pediatric ophthalmologist said its ok for him to read by his nightlight.

Good luck! As you can see, we haven't found a sure fire way to address it. Just things that help.
She does like it when I pile the blankets on her (she has three) so maybe a weighted blanket would be nice for her. She has her 'night time' music every night (a CD of Finnish lullabies that are so melodic and relaxing they almost send me to sleep when I'm sat there!). I used to let her read but it turned into her putting the lights on, pulling all her books out of the shelf and then telling me she can't decide what to read (not that she actually reads you know, just looks at the pictures and remembers the stories or makes them up)
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Old 01-08-2016, 02:20 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie Jean McGee View Post
Good Lord hun


my kids got put to bed


they had to stay there


whether they got up, roamed about, got a book or their game boy or whatever (it was the 90s) was utterly irrelevant.


The Rule Was, we werent to HEAR them.


Both my kids turned out to be excellent sleepers so they usually just crashed.


The couple of times my son rocked on were due to Sugar highs so My Fault anyway (turned out he couldn't drink coke, still doesn't as an adult)


If I or their dad heard a peep they got sternly told off and put back to bed, lights off, and DONT turn them on Again


but if they got up and silently did *whatever* we ignored it


some kids are just like that - up all night - no matter what you do you wont change them - youll usually find one parent or grandparent that is exactly the same.


The point is, teach them how to manage it rather trying to force it out of them


There were a couple of times my son couldn't wake up in the mornings, and that was the time for the Dealing - See, Son, if youd gone to bed at a decent hour you wouldn't feel this way<<<he learnt he needed to go to sleep, he was always crashed by 10, 11 latest


I honestly cannot believe lying down with a kid that age. It seems to be Making an Issue where none should exist.
I've tried that ever since she was a toddler. She doesn't learn from the exhaustion, she just suffers from it. Its clearly not working.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksvillemom View Post
Just sleep with her if you can. I know people say not to do this, but in many cultures it's the norm and it worked for us. Our son was afraid of someone breaking into the house (don't know where he got the idea since we'd never had a break-in). After a while, he was able to fall asleep on his own. But there were many times when I would fall asleep before him! - but at least he knew I was there.
I can't sleep with her as she only has a tiny bed so no room for me and I really need some time in the evening for me and my OH as its the only adult time we get. Normally we watch one show after I put her to bed before he needs to go sleep too as he is up at 5 in the mornings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I would hold off on the Melatonin until talking to the doctor.
Yeah not going to give Melatonin without the doctor's say-so
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Old 01-08-2016, 06:56 AM
 
4,783 posts, read 4,665,088 times
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Did anyone ever try those books that are supposed to lull your child to sleep as you read them aloud?
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Old 01-08-2016, 08:42 AM
 
1,261 posts, read 1,992,047 times
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This is a good website that deals solely with this topic, has resources and support - and a parents's forum.

Sleepy Planet Parenting
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Old 01-08-2016, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
Reputation: 10153
She didn't even sleep through after all that so still ended up in our room and now she's begged to go for a sleepover so that puts a pause on my efforts, although interestingly she tells me that she falls straight to sleep when she's at her sleepovers, maybe because she's sharing the bed with her friend.
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