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Old 01-07-2016, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,221,841 times
Reputation: 10153

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My kid turns 5 next monta and she's always had trouble falling asleep but last night I decided to try something new and sat in the room with her. I made sure she stayed lying down and quiet and I kept silent and still too. I put her to bed at 7 and it was 11 o'clock before she finally fell asleep! She routinely stays awake until 11 or 12 but I thought that was because she played in bed but even being still and silent she still stays awake that long. This can't be healthy for her, right? Once she's asleep she'll usually sleep right through unless she has a nightmare and she is very difficult to wake in the morning. Could this be delayed sleep cycle or insomnia? I know I suffered insomnia from childhood but I don't know how young it started.

This is the second night and I'm taking a break now as this is driving me insanely - I can't sit in the dark for hours every night.
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Old 01-07-2016, 12:42 PM
 
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Ask the ped! That sounds hard for her!
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Old 01-07-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,221,841 times
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I asked her doctor about it a few months ago as at the time she was suffering from a fear of potential nightmares, he referred us to the child psychologoist who pretty much just told me to try sitting in the room with her, so that wasn't much help. He's the only ped in town, just checked and there isn't even a private one
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Old 01-07-2016, 12:55 PM
 
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Geez. Thanks for the help, guys. Would it help to report back findings to the psychologist?

I am curious. What was she doing during the period you were with her? What was her demeanor?

There is a book

Robot Check

most notable for the much maligned "cry it out" business for babies. But there are sections, I am pretty sure there are sections on nightmares, if that is still an issue for your daughter. Check it at the library! Don't buy it on my recommendation because I don't remember well enough to be sure.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:01 PM
 
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My kids are the same way. I got their doctor's permission to give them 1mcg of liquid melatonin at bedtime. They now fall asleep in 20 minutes. I only give it to them on school nights because I want to give their systems a break on the weekends. On the weekends it takes the 4 year old about 3 hours to fall asleep, though the 6 year old seems to be getting better, she's only about 45 minutes now (used to be longer).


I was the same way as a child, it was very difficult to handle then as I didn't have the option of taking anything. As an adult I've learned to use melatonin, calms forte, valerian root, and the occasional benedryl to help when it gets bad. My parents told me they have also started taking melatonin, it appears this problem may be hereditary. My husband does not have this problem, he falls asleep in about 18 seconds, that lucky duck.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,221,841 times
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I'll be reporting back to the psychologists via the her nurse when I take her for her 5 year check up next month. She's not afraid of nightmares any more though thankfully, she just can't fall asleep.

The whole time she'll spend a while whispering to herself while I shush her, then she'll be silent and clearly trying to sleep for a long time, then she seems to give up and starts whispering again or trying to talk to me while I shush her. Sometimes she'll say she's hungry but after one slice of break I say no more otherwise she's eating all evening. Right now she's tossing and turning and occasionally whispering for the cat. Its 3 hours since bedtime.

I'll check out the book, thanks.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:04 PM
 
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Oh and by the way, I do lay in their room most of the time on the weekends with them (the kids sleep in the same room by choice, even though they have separate rooms). I just get all my stuff done first, snuggle in with my 4 year old, and go to sleep. So even though he is awake, he knows mommy is there.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,221,841 times
Reputation: 10153
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbab5 View Post
My kids are the same way. I got their doctor's permission to give them 1mcg of liquid melatonin at bedtime. They now fall asleep in 20 minutes. I only give it to them on school nights because I want to give their systems a break on the weekends. On the weekends it takes the 4 year old about 3 hours to fall asleep, though the 6 year old seems to be getting better, she's only about 45 minutes now (used to be longer).


I was the same way as a child, it was very difficult to handle then as I didn't have the option of taking anything. As an adult I've learned to use melatonin, calms forte, valerian root, and the occasional benedryl to help when it gets bad. My parents told me they have also started taking melatonin, it appears this problem may be hereditary. My husband does not have this problem, he falls asleep in about 18 seconds, that lucky duck.
I've been thinking about asking the doctor about melatonin as I've heard of kids being prescribed it
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:05 PM
 
1,891 posts, read 1,132,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natsku View Post
I'll be reporting back to the psychologists via the her nurse when I take her for her 5 year check up next month. She's not afraid of nightmares any more though thankfully, she just can't fall asleep.

The whole time she'll spend a while whispering to herself while I shush her, then she'll be silent and clearly trying to sleep for a long time, then she seems to give up and starts whispering again or trying to talk to me while I shush her. Sometimes she'll say she's hungry but after one slice of break I say no more otherwise she's eating all evening. Right now she's tossing and turning and occasionally whispering for the cat. Its 3 hours since bedtime.

I'll check out the book, thanks.

Goodness.


I don't know if you can get Amazon where you are at, but here is the link to the liquid melatonin we use: Robot Check
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Arizona
1,599 posts, read 1,269,048 times
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My friend has a daughter like this. She put her through all kinds of tests and even did a sleep study to find out that this sleep pattern is just what is normal for her and it's not detrimental to her health. She can stay up to almost midnight most nights, wake up at 8:00 or 9:00 and be totally fine. She is currently 5 going on 6 and has always been a night owl and not needed much sleep. The only difference here is the nightmares. I don't her daughter had a problem with that.

If your daughter is on track developmentally (physically, mentally, and academically), does not get tired/fall asleep/need to take a nap during the day, is eating and drinking normally, and basically "normal" in all other aspects of her life, then she is okay and this is just her normal sleep pattern.

The book "The No Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers" talks about this and it also has a chapter on nightmares and how to deal with them. It's written so that after you read the intro you can skip to the chapters that pertain to your specific problems.
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