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Old 01-12-2016, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
3,836 posts, read 6,617,653 times
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Do you live near a university? Most universities with teacher training programs offer summer internships for their students and need elementary aged kids to attend. A program like this could benefit your child at no cost to you.
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Old 01-12-2016, 09:28 AM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,509,210 times
Reputation: 23714
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
Where did I say his dream is unattainable? I said I don't know where to begin to support it!

The school evaluated him and sent him to 4th grade unprepared. I don't trust them.
No, homeschooling isn't an option. My husband would implode at that thought! He seems obsessed with his "social status" more than education!
My husband was super against when I tried to homeschool. It was a HUGE fight. But he wasn't the one having to deal with homework, meetings with the schools, 504 meetings, dealing with the tutors, dealing with the kids when they were in distress over school. So I "won". But, again, we did end up redoing that year for both the kids and putting them in private school.

Homeschool worked for my daughter. She ate it up, but did miss her friends. My son (has ADHD)...it was torture! LOL just the other day he tried to talk me into having him do homeschool again and said he would do his work this time. sure...(not). Plus he is doing well in school now, so there is no need.

I totally feel you on the state of the schools in that state (and several others). Its just beyond me how it got so bad. We got no help, what so ever, from them. Just a whole lot of complaining.

Best of luck figuring out the right answer and getting hubby on board. Maybe if you delegate some more of the problems to him, he will get more on board with you. My husband was really insulated from the problems. He just didn't seem to know what we were really dealing with. But if you ask him now, he will tell you he is glad I won the battle.
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Old 01-12-2016, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,031 posts, read 98,929,643 times
Reputation: 31481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
Send a letter to your principal stating you'd like to schedule a meeting about your son's challenges. Ask that the teacher, guidance counselor, and special ed rep also attend. At that meeting make sure that they have seen the assessment, and ask what services they can provide for him.
Of all the suggestions I've read, this one is the best. The OP's husband may (note use of word) be more convinced if he hears it from someone else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
okay here is my take on it ...what about a tutor or maybe a private school or a Christian school where they take way more time with the kids than public school does ...some kids just need a slower based curriculum mostly taught at Christian schools and private schools . my daughter lives in florida and she and her husband are looking into private schools and Christian schools . I know my daughter went to catholic school and she was so far ahead of most of the kids in the neighborhood who went to public school it was not even funny and we lived in florida at the time .
There is no assurance that these schools will do better than the public schools, and changing schools can be disruptive to learning as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
"I" don't know any math at all. I wasn't exactly a straight A student being sent to ballet and having spent every waking moment dancing for a very long time. I can't tutor, plus what we used to do is very different than what's being taught these days. My husband comes home late & his lacking patience soooo...my daughter tries to help him but he won't let her most of the time...she's straight A student and understands this new math very well. We also have a kindergartner who needs to get used to school etc/homework so he's not an only child where all the time can be devoted to him!

I think he'll do well if he repeated 4th grade simply because repetition works with him when it comes to remembering stuff.

He has a hard time in reading not because he can't read, he reads well, but the words used to describe math problems are confusing, so it's "comprehension" more than the physical act of reading! I don't even get half this stuff the way it is worded.
The bold. My husband has a PhD in physics, and when he'd try to help our daughter with higher level math in high school she's say that's not the way Mr. "Smith" does it. DH then told her to talk with Mr. Smith then, which was a good approach, though probably not right for a 4th grader. A doctor I work with had the same problem with his kids and math in HS.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-12-2016 at 09:58 AM..
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Old 01-12-2016, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
3,171 posts, read 2,906,932 times
Reputation: 3529
I think checking with local universities is a good idea. Maybe see if you can find someone getting a degree in elementary education. I found my tutor by checking on our neighborhood facebook page. Are you able to do that? What about nextdoor.com? Does your neighborhood have a site like that? What about other schools in the area? Middle schools? High schools? I pay $25 for an hour and my tutor is a 2nd grade teacher within our county.
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:09 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,866 posts, read 18,937,245 times
Reputation: 25133
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
"I" don't know any math at all. I wasn't exactly a straight A student being sent to ballet and having spent every waking moment dancing for a very long time. I can't tutor, plus what we used to do is very different than what's being taught these days. My husband comes home late & his lacking patience soooo...my daughter tries to help him but he won't let her most of the time...she's straight A student and understands this new math very well. We also have a kindergartner who needs to get used to school etc/homework so he's not an only child where all the time can be devoted to him!

I think he'll do well if he repeated 4th grade simply because repetition works with him when it comes to remembering stuff.

He has a hard time in reading not because he can't read, he reads well, but the words used to describe math problems are confusing, so it's "comprehension" more than the physical act of reading! I don't even get half this stuff the way it is worded.
You do know math...you know how to add, subtract, multiply and divide. You understand units of measurement, as far as whether something should be measured in inches or miles. You can figure out how much pay for a week should be, or calculate a tip. He's not doing anything more complicated than that in the fourth grade.

The "new math" is just the same old math dressed up to look more complicated. The only thing I've seen added is financial literacy, which might be just a TX thing. If you do come across something that you don't understand, there are so many websites that will explain it to you...look it up and see how it relates to the math that you already know. Math does get more complicated in middle school, but he's not there yet.

As far as word problems go, sometimes my kids have problems with that even though they're both straight A students. Our strategy for that is to underline the useful info and cross out things that we don't need to know. Sometimes we'll read the question out loud a couple of times to be sure we know what it's asking. Some questions are designed to be tricky. Sometimes I'll reword the question in a way that makes it easier for the kids to understand.

And working with multiple kids at once? Sometimes that's easier...get everyone to sit down at the kitchen table and work on their homework. If one kid needs help, you and the other kids are there and everyone can figure it out together. Kids like to learn in groups...I used to tutor a neighbor's daughter and we would work outside on nice days, and pretty soon we had a group of 9 or 10 kids sitting around doing homework together, all the kids in the apartment building would come out to do homework as a group.

I think maybe you have some anxiety about math that makes it more difficult for you to help your son with it. I think that you don't expect to be able to understand any of it, and maybe that makes your son feel like he won't be able to do it either. Since tutors are expensive, what about hiring an older kid to tutor him? My 8th grader is very good at helping my 5th grader. What if you find a kid in your neighborhood who could tutor your son a couple days a week? Advertise on Next Door or ask around. Too bad we don't live near you...my 8th grader still thinks ten dollars is a big amount of money, so she'd definitely be an affordable tutor
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:10 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,419,526 times
Reputation: 4337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riley09swb View Post
I think checking with local universities is a good idea. Maybe see if you can find someone getting a degree in elementary education. I found my tutor by checking on our neighborhood facebook page. Are you able to do that? What about nextdoor.com? Does your neighborhood have a site like that? What about other schools in the area? Middle schools? High schools? I pay $25 for an hour and my tutor is a 2nd grade teacher within our county.
No, no neighborhood pages...

I can try USF, closest university and see what they have if anything...
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:11 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,419,526 times
Reputation: 4337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Of all the suggestions I've read, this one is the best. The OP's husband may (note use of word) be more convinced if he hears it from someone else.



There is no assurance that these schools will do better than the public schools, and changing schools can be disruptive to learning as well.



The bold. My husband has a PhD in physics, and when he'd try to help our daughter with higher level math in high school she's say that's not the way Mr. "Smith" does it. DH then told her to talk with Mr. Smith then, which was a good approach, though probably not right for a 4th grader. A doctor I work with had the same problem with his kids and math in HS.
Yeah! Hubby is really good with math & he too was baffled more than once with how they teach it these days.
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:19 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,866 posts, read 18,937,245 times
Reputation: 25133
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
My husband was super against when I tried to homeschool. It was a HUGE fight. But he wasn't the one having to deal with homework, meetings with the schools, 504 meetings, dealing with the tutors, dealing with the kids when they were in distress over school. So I "won". But, again, we did end up redoing that year for both the kids and putting them in private school.

Homeschool worked for my daughter. She ate it up, but did miss her friends. My son (has ADHD)...it was torture! LOL just the other day he tried to talk me into having him do homeschool again and said he would do his work this time. sure...(not). Plus he is doing well in school now, so there is no need.

I totally feel you on the state of the schools in that state (and several others). Its just beyond me how it got so bad. We got no help, what so ever, from them. Just a whole lot of complaining.

Best of luck figuring out the right answer and getting hubby on board. Maybe if you delegate some more of the problems to him, he will get more on board with you. My husband was really insulated from the problems. He just didn't seem to know what we were really dealing with. But if you ask him now, he will tell you he is glad I won the battle.
My husband was the opposite, he insisted on homeschooling and I didn't think I could do it. Online school was the compromise for us...my husband wanted the kids out of the environment they were in, but he didn't have any problems with the curriculum at the school. I was afraid I wouldn't be able to make the kids do school, but with online school we have to enter attendance and they have teachers to answer to, so I'm not stuck constantly forcing the kids to do their work.
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:28 AM
 
4,655 posts, read 2,625,045 times
Reputation: 4130
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
They don't have that here. We're in Florida! Here, he's either mainstreamed, or in special ed all together which is usually where those with Autism and Down syndrome are in. That would be quite the downgrade.
Strange, I'm in Florida too and my kids are ADHD and NOT with Autism and Down kids. Which county are you in? Has your son been classified for ESE? If not, he should be "Other Health Impaired".

http://www.fldoe.org/academics/excep...rment-ohi.stml

Here is the criteria required:

6A-6.030152 Exceptional Student Education Eligibility for Students with Other Health Impairment.
(1) Definition. Other health impairment means having limited strength, vitality or alertness, including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment, that is due to chronic or acute health problems. This includes, but is not limited to, asthma, attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Tourette syndrome, diabetes, epilepsy, a heart condition, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, rheumatic fever, sickle cell anemia, and acquired brain injury.
(2) General education interventions and activities. Prior to referral for evaluation, the requirements in subsection 6A-6.0331(1), F.A.C., must be met.
(3) Evaluation. In addition to the provisions in subsection 6A-6.0331(5), F.A.C., the evaluation for determining eligibility shall include the following:
(a) A report of a medical examination, within the previous twelve-month (12) period, from a physician(s) licensed in Florida in accordance with Chapters 458 or 459, F.S., unless a report of medical examination from a physician licensed in another state is permitted in accordance with paragraph 6A-6.0331(3)(e), F.A.C. The physician’s report must provide a description of the impairment and any medical implications for instruction; and,
(b) An educational evaluation that identifies educational and environmental needs of the student.
(4) Criteria for eligibility. A student with other health impairment is eligible for exceptional student education if the following criteria are met:
(a) Evidence of other health impairment that results in reduced efficiency in schoolwork and adversely affects the student’s performance in the educational environment; and,
(b) The student needs special education as defined in paragraph 6A-6.03411(1)(kk), F.A.C.
Rulemaking Authority 1003.01, 1003.57(1)(e), 1003.571 FS. Law Implemented 1003.01(3), 1003.21(1), 1003.57(1)(e), 1003.571 FS. History–New 7-1-07, Amended 12-15-09.



I'm assuming as that your son is on medication that he's been seen by a specialist. If, even with the medication he needs some accommodation in the classroom (i.e. for math he finds it hard to concentrate and be successful in mainstream) then the school district needs to come up with a solution that is the least restrictive environment. This could be through providing a learning aide in the mainstream class to extra help after school, etc.

This of course assumes you've done your own homework with respect to diagnosis and recommendation from a qualified physician.

I hate to say this but keeping your son back a year may not yield anything better if he can't concentrate and be successful in his current environment.
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Old 01-12-2016, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,506 posts, read 15,968,402 times
Reputation: 38909
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
We asked them for tutors since 3rd grade to no avail.
Tutors we found ourselves from Google & the likes were very expensive.

While it is true that good tutors can be expensive, it is amazing how much a good tutor can accomplish in just an hour or an hour and a half one or two times a week. Compare that to other expensive things like college or your child being retained and out of the work force for an extra year after they graduate and often, IMHO, in the long run that amount ends up being a bargain.
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