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Old 01-20-2016, 09:24 PM
 
15,768 posts, read 13,205,091 times
Reputation: 19652

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie Jean McGee View Post
THINK AGAIN


Adult children themselves can and do sue working parents for Child Support, right up to the age of 25.


Evidence?
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Old 01-20-2016, 09:48 PM
 
12,932 posts, read 19,831,249 times
Reputation: 33994
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
The devil is in the details here. Again we have to be careful with the words. The OP seems to be saying that she is in fear of being forced to support her daughter after the age of 18. Support implies food, clothing, minimum standard of living etc. That is not going to happen. Now college expenses, tuition/room and board, might be ordered IF her husband takes her to court and is willing to pay half. She is claiming the STATE is going to force her to pay her daughters college expenses. Or that her daughter will personally sue her for support. Neither of which will happen unless the daughter sues both parents and that is highly unlikely to happen as well.

As for "parental payments" I have found nothing where child support payments are continued except where parents may have to make monthly payments to the college for tuition and NJ is easily even more liberal than even MA when it comes to divorced parents paying for college.
Devil in the details for sure. The only scenario I, or the OP mentioned, was college expenses. And, as I pointed out more than once, it appeared to be moot, because the daughter didn't seem headed that way.

But parents who think they will automatically be off the hook for college because their child has reached the age of 18, may be in for a surprise.

Adult children suing parents for child support: Frivolous lawsuit or logical extension of the law? | Law Blogs

And NJ has billed both parents in the case of divorce:

Lawsuit Shines Spotlight On Whether Parents Should Be Forced To Pay For College

Again, details, and not true in every state, or even every case.
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Old 01-20-2016, 10:03 PM
 
2,937 posts, read 1,664,859 times
Reputation: 6644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie Jean McGee View Post
THINK AGAIN


Adult children themselves can and do sue working parents for Child Support, right up to the age of 25.


Um proof?
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:27 AM
 
15,768 posts, read 13,205,091 times
Reputation: 19652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
Devil in the details for sure. The only scenario I, or the OP mentioned, was college expenses. And, as I pointed out more than once, it appeared to be moot, because the daughter didn't seem headed that way.

But parents who think they will automatically be off the hook for college because their child has reached the age of 18, may be in for a surprise.

Adult children suing parents for child support: Frivolous lawsuit or logical extension of the law? | Law Blogs

And NJ has billed both parents in the case of divorce:

Lawsuit Shines Spotlight On Whether Parents Should Be Forced To Pay For College

Again, details, and not true in every state, or even every case.
The first link is about the canning case which was ultimately voluntarily dismissed and for good reason, as her parents were not divorced the likelihood of her suing successfully would have been very low.

The second is the Ricci case which she won, because the judge found that were it not for the divorce and subsequent remarriage and additional 5 kids, the parents would have contributed to her education. So that one I understand at least from a legal standpoint.

You may have only mentioned college expenses but the OP certainly muddied the waters with her talk of cellphones, inability to not only kick the daughter out but to leave the state (also not true) and in the very first post she seems to imply that she has to pay all her living expenses up until 23 regardless of whether or not she goes to college or major or any requirements about progress and so on.
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Old 01-21-2016, 07:52 AM
 
8,740 posts, read 8,957,632 times
Reputation: 12208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
Does it really matter? The money must be sent, regardless of the name it's addressed to. I don't know what the panty bunching is about. If there isn't a court order of support for the child, then the money issue is moot.

Yes,

but in this particular thread, the OP is concerned that SHE, as the custodial parent, will be forced to pay support directly to the child.


Child support is never paid to the child. It's one parent to another.
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Old 01-21-2016, 10:23 AM
 
6,805 posts, read 3,284,555 times
Reputation: 8481
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeHa View Post
Um proof?
Anyone can sue- not for child support, per se, but for some kind of financial award. There actually have been a couple of cases in New Jersey where the kids were awarded financial assistance payments from the parents for attending college, even though they were estranged. Both of these were in New Jersey, which has very different rulings on these types of things than any other state. Here's one:

https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/dad-...864515872.html
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Old 01-21-2016, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
1,716 posts, read 1,494,723 times
Reputation: 4114
Quote:
Originally Posted by westwind15 View Post
Not in Massachusetts. I m from Ca, and what you stated is completely true there, but NOT here. A "child" here who is in college has a legal right to support from both parents until age 23. Look it up. It's true. They can sue both parents for it and win.
So don't pay for her college, and don't sign for any loans. The chances of her being able to get into college on a 100% scholarship is slim, and without co signed student loans, probably zero.

No college, out of HS and over 18, problem solved in 6 months.
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Old 01-21-2016, 12:58 PM
 
373 posts, read 245,033 times
Reputation: 420
Honestly I would change your locks and go on vacation for a week...
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Old 01-21-2016, 04:41 PM
 
Location: kansas city
678 posts, read 543,478 times
Reputation: 554
Quote:
Originally Posted by westwind15 View Post
My daughter was a dream child, so well behaved, until she was about 13. Then she became an arrogant, obnoxious jerk most of the time. I kept a lid on the major things. She gets excellent grades, has nice friends, no signs of drugs or drinking, and is beloved to other adults, who think she is beyond wonderful. She saves all of her abuse for me.

Now she is 18. and thinks it a total free-for-all in making Mom miserable. After work, I'd rather be anywhere but home. She knows everything there ever was to know, will argue for hours, and is if you try to escape, she will follow you from room to room and just won't quit. Her bedroom is an absolute pigsty and she refuses to clean it. She insults and berates me constantly. She does not lift a finger around the house, and refuses to get any kind of part time job. She is in her last semester of high school. Though she is 18, and a legal adult (as she reminds me regularly), I can't toss her out no matter what she does, under MA laws, which keep these kids babies for far too long. These brats can live on their own, go to college in basket weaving. and collect child support from both parents up to age 23! Yes, 23.

She does not think she has to do anything that I say. She refuses and says "you can't do anything to me". What exactly can I do? I can't take away her personal possessions as she is a legal adult (again MA law, thank you so much). I can't toss her out. She has me over a barrel and she knows it. She claims she is joining the military in July. I sure hope so. Do I just never come home until July?

Ideas?
I WISH I HAD YOU AS A MOM!! Im black and if i did that to my mom!?!?! Are you serious! MY ASS WOULD BE TOAST!! Literally! she would slice it up baked it put butter on it and serve it to me! AND GIVE ME SECONDS! I think its kinds F u c k e d up that you actually have to go through this like your giving her the power to do whatever she wants is just ludicrous. I grew up with people telling me how everyone would get beatings all the time! WHAT HAPPENED! If your letting your kid grow up to be spoiled like that to where she cant even clean?!? Your NOT raising your kid correctly.
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Old 01-22-2016, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts for the time being
314 posts, read 598,024 times
Reputation: 354
[quote=move4ward;42700439]I googled it and found nothing of the sort.

All I get are articles from divorce lawyers. It only applies if the child is living with the custodial parent until 23 yrs old, in case of divorce. It's to help out the other parent provide the same standard of living as 2 parents. See the 5 links from MA divorce attorneys on divorce law below.

If you believe it, then keep paying your daughter until she is 23. LOL. Find yourself an atty and ask him yourself. A 5 minute chat with the atty will be cheaper.




Law does not work that way. A statute is just the beginning. After that, case law take over. Case law makes changes, adds things, creates exceptions, etc. Not a single that you found applies to my problem. This is not part of a divorce, and a family law attorney yesterday told me that is is a juvenile law issue, not family law.

Think of this this way - The U.S.A Constitution. Basically, it is a great big federal statute. However, think about how cases have changed it. There are a massive amount of cases that talk about constitution rights, and make decisions, but many of them do not show up in the Constitution. You would have to read the case law to know about them. That happens in every area of law.
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