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Old 02-07-2008, 02:49 PM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,236,200 times
Reputation: 5787

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My 13 yo will come down saying she can't go to sleep. I have her drink a glass of milk. Milk has natural enzymes that make you drowsy. She does not even like milk and won't drink it for breakfast but she will on her own now if she comes down not being able to go to sleep or sometimes BEFORE she goes upstairs to bed will fix herself a glass of milk.

She has to get up at 7:00 am and her bedtime has always been 8:00pm UNLESS she was out for something school related or another activity (which is not all the time). I found that the LATER I let her stay up before going to bed the harder it was for her to go to sleep. I kept moving up her bedtime till we found the right time for her to be able to go to sleep once going to bed AND be able to get up in the morning without TOO MUCH trouble (she does not get up easy but MUCH better than she used to). She just HAS to HAVE that much sleep in order to function. I'm the opposite (6 hours but would LOVE more on some mornings).

After dinner and a bath/shower have him read a book, relax and unwind (no video games or anything else that stimulates the brain) and drink a glass of milk. Slowly move his bedtime up till you find the right time. Like I said, the later it was mine went to bed the longer it took her to go to sleep.

I'd also ask him how comfortable his bed and pillow are. Make sure the mattress gives him the right support for him and helps him rest. If your in a bed that is uncomfortable it is hard to go to sleep.
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Old 02-07-2008, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Wake Forest
934 posts, read 931,803 times
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I think some boys that age may also start to experience 'growing pains'. I'm not sure, as my son is not even two yet, but I remember one of my friends talking about how her son had a hard time sleeping around that age because of the soreness. ( I never knew growing pains were REAL!). Before bed, she would have him take a hot bath to soak, have a cup of hot cocoa (made with milk) and give him a tylenol. That helped him...

I would not do sleep medications (even OTC ones) unless a doctor specifically recommends it.
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Old 02-07-2008, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,717 posts, read 59,563,864 times
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Melatonin is not a sleep medication. It is a vitamin of sorts. It is already in you, you just add a little bit more. If you are worried about it, do not allow you child to eat turkey.

I would give a child meltonin without a Dr. advice before I would give them Tylenol without a Dr advice. (Although I would not be concerned about either one in small quantities.)
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Old 02-07-2008, 08:27 PM
 
Location: The Big D
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Here is a link to askdrsears.com where they have the "foods that make you sleep" list and one is milk. The reason, it produces things LIKE melatonin. You don't have to give your child or take a melatonin "pill" but you CAN eat things that let your body NATURALLY produce it.


FOODS FOR SLEEP

Eating carbohydrates with tryptophan-containing foods makes this calming amino acid more available to the brain. A high carbohydrate meal stimulates the release of insulin, which helps clear from the bloodstream those amino acids that compete with tryptophan, allowing more of this natural sleep-inducing amino acid to enter the brain and manufacture sleep- inducing substances, such as serotonin and melatonin. Eating a high-protein meal without accompanying carbohydrates may keep you awake, since protein-rich foods also contain the amino acid, tyrosine, which perks up the brain.



SNOOZE FOODS
These are foods high in the sleep-inducing amino acid tryptophan:

Dairy products: cottage cheese, cheese, milk
Soy products: soy milk, tofu, soybean nuts
Seafood
Meats
Poultry
Whole grains
Beans
Rice
Hummus
Lentils
Hazelnuts, Peanuts
Eggs
Sesame seeds, sunflower seeds

BEST BEDTIME SNACKS
Foods that are high in carbohydrates and calcium, and medium-to-low in protein also make ideal sleep-inducing bedtime snacks. Some examples:

apple pie and ice cream (my favorite)
whole-grain cereal with milk
hazelnuts and tofu
oatmeal and raisin cookies, and a glass of milk
peanut butter sandwich, ground sesame seeds
(It takes around one hour for the tryptophan in the foods to reach the brain, so don't wait until right before bedtime to have your snack.)


BEST DINNERS FOR SLEEP
Meals that are high in carbohydrates and low-to-medium in protein will help you relax in the evening and set you up for a good night's sleep. Try the following "dinners for sleep":

pasta with parmesan cheese
scrambled eggs and cheese
tofu stirfry
hummus with whole wheat pita bread
seafood, pasta, and cottage cheese
meats and poultry with veggies
tuna salad sandwich
chili with beans, not spicy
sesame seeds (rich in tryptophan) sprinkled on salad with tuna chunks, and whole wheat crackers

Lighter meals are more likely to give you a restful night's sleep. High-fat meals and large servings prolong the work your digestive system needs to do, and all the gas production and rumblings may keep you awake. Some people find that highly-seasoned foods (e.g., hot peppers and garlic) interfere with sleep, especially if you suffer from heartburn. (See gastroesophageal reflux). Going to bed with a full stomach does not, for most people, promote a restful night's sleep. While you may fall asleep faster, all the intestinal work required to digest a big meal is likely to cause frequent waking and a poorer quality of sleep. Eat your evening meal early.
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Old 02-08-2008, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,717 posts, read 59,563,864 times
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Ha ha you have pretty much covered every food that there is. simpler to say "eat. It will make you sleepy." very true, if you have a desk job the two hours after lunch are the hardest to get through.
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Old 02-08-2008, 02:37 PM
 
4,721 posts, read 13,610,199 times
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I also have an 11 yr old son. I would advice NOT giving him any medication. Check on his diet. What he is eating may be a problam. Does he have anything with caffeine/chcolate/sodas/sugar treats in the late aft early evening ? Does he get to stay up late and sleep late on week ends? That might effect his "clocK" too. Meds are the ulitmate last resort in my book. Not just from a moms stand point, ex-nurse also. I would hope most peds/docs would agree and do a check list on several reasons for his inablility to get a good nites rest....so important.
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Old 02-08-2008, 03:51 PM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,236,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Ha ha you have pretty much covered every food that there is. simpler to say "eat. It will make you sleepy." very true, if you have a desk job the two hours after lunch are the hardest to get through.
Well, there was an LONG list of foods to NOT eat that can keep you up too.
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Old 02-08-2008, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,717 posts, read 59,563,864 times
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Yes there is. Sorry. I did not mean to be insulting. I just thought that it was funny. Almost everything makes you sleepy. Actually it was very nice of you to take the time to post this long list.
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Old 02-09-2008, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 20,585,817 times
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A small amount of Scotch or Jack Daniels in some orange juice will put em right to sleep.
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Old 02-09-2008, 01:26 PM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,236,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevK View Post
A small amount of Scotch or Jack Daniels in some orange juice will put em right to sleep.
I find 2 glasses of wine usually does the trick. At least it seems to put me right to sleep.
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