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Old 02-03-2016, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
3,171 posts, read 2,908,641 times
Reputation: 3529

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
I'm offering a different point of view. Perhaps I'm wrong-headed, but in our family, the dogs are dogs and the cats are cats. They are not our fur-babies as substitutes for people. They have an intimate position in our family. But when grandchildren come into the picture, we will have hard decisions to make, including having to give them up if we want our grandchildren in our home. Our dogs are skittish. One has a history of nipping when nervous. We don't want to have the experience of having to schedule plastic surgery after a facial bite. That nearly happened to our son.

In the case of the OP, we aren't talking about a child. The issue is an as-yet-unborn baby, to be brought into the home as a newborn. I am of the opinion, which is harsh, that the mother needs to find another alternative for her living situation that she will provide her child. If she can't provide a proper home, then she should consider placing her child in a home that will provide the material life that she can't provide. I know that is an unpopular idea, but I thought it should be heard. I've gotten several rep points, so I am not alone in this opinion. It has validity, according to the situation.

OP, if you know for a fact that you can provide a warm, loving home for your child, then please do. I teach children who are often born into hellish environments with no alternative for a better life. That's not what I'm suggesting that you would provide. I know you want to do the best for your child, but please reconsider putting your days-old baby anywhere near a dog that has already bitten. You would hate to have regrets.

My husband's parents had a dog that didn't care for kids. When my nephew visited, they put the dog in their bedroom. You don't have to give the dogs away just keep them apart while visiting.
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Old 02-03-2016, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,506 posts, read 15,977,386 times
Reputation: 38909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riley09swb View Post
My husband's parents had a dog that didn't care for kids. When my nephew visited, they put the dog in their bedroom. You don't have to give the dogs away just keep them apart while visiting.

The baby will be living in the house not occasionally visiting.
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Old 02-04-2016, 12:46 AM
 
12,507 posts, read 13,120,860 times
Reputation: 8917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I can't believe your sister's family didn't take the dog to the pound when it bit you. I'm an animal lover but I absolutely would not have a dog that bit someone in the face. ... They are asking to have someone seriously injured.
i could not agree more with this

when my son was a toddler we went to visit a new friend and her two daughters for a playdate at this other mom's house. she mentioned the dog is in the garage (we heard it in there barking) and she told us that the dog had bitten her infant daughter in the face when she was a newborn. i was speechless with horror as the mom calmly pointed out the scars on her 3-year-old's face, over 20 stitches initially and then "it's required 3 plastic surgeries so far, with two more surgeries to go."

i did ask "you kept the dog?" and the really chilling answer was "oh yes, he's part of the family, we had him long before we had our two children, so we are more attached to him." i could not get out of that house fast enough, and did not ever go back. chilling. the dog part was bad enough. the mom's attitude was terrifying.

Last edited by Tzaphkiel; 02-04-2016 at 12:59 AM..
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Old 02-04-2016, 01:11 AM
 
25,876 posts, read 49,802,708 times
Reputation: 19321
Friends of friends have a farm...

I was on a visit and asked if they still had Rex... learned Rex snapped at the two year old and was put down 10 minutes later...

Life on a farm is a dose of reality...
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Old 02-04-2016, 02:30 AM
 
33,176 posts, read 39,170,150 times
Reputation: 28530
Some points to ponder=
https://www.google.ca/#q=Catahoula+d...+attacks+child
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Old 02-04-2016, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,465 posts, read 7,173,474 times
Reputation: 31254
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABCBLUE View Post
I'm due with my first baby girl in June. Currently live with my sister, BIL and teenage nephews. I can't yet afford a place of my own so have nowhere to go. The only problem is that they have 3 dogs. The 2 were around when my nephews were growing up and are very gentle and sweet. But the newest dog, a catahoula leopard dog, has some issues. Touching him too much provokes him and he growls. He even bit me in the face before which required stitches but I was honestly asking for it. I was playing tug with him and put my face near his.

He does, however, move away if an adult stands up and tells him off. He has never just approached a person and gotten aggressive. If you leave him alone he leaves you alone. But I'm still very concerned about the baby. We all agreed to take extra caution when she is a newborn. Anyone holding the baby must not allow him to come near her and if he does, use authority to make him leave. My room/the nursery area has a door that stays shut at all times and none of the dogs are allowed in there. If God forbid I don't have my own place by the time she walks I'm planning on teaching her to avoid him altogether.

Any other ideas? Please don't say something rude-I don't have a choice but to stay here right now and will whatever necessary to protect my daughter.
I have no idea why you would put a dog above your own baby! You're going to honestly spend every single minute guarding her?! And tell everyone to do the same who visits? Because a baby will never inadvertently "ask for it"?! You must be crazy - why are you having a baby if your dogs come first?
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Old 02-04-2016, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,465 posts, read 7,173,474 times
Reputation: 31254
Quote:
Originally Posted by mic111 View Post
I would talk to your family about training the dog to a basket muzzle. They are easy to train the dog to. We used the "snack basket" method. Putting snacks in it and calling the dog over to eat them. Then after they were comfortable putting their face in, putting it on briefly and then taking it away, more treats. Gradually working up to fastening it on for short times and working the time up. Lots of treats. Eventually it is no more foreign or bothersome to them than a collar.

You will all be more comfortable with the dog in a basket muzzle when the baby comes. They will need time outside of it which can be when they go outside, are sleeping in their crates (with door closed) or when being supervised in another room with door closed. But it wouldn't hurt to have them in one when wandering around the house as long as people are home. But when people all go out they should not be in it for their own safety.

Also work on getting the dogs used to baby gates and crates. Even the old dogs might like a crate to get away from a curious/active baby. They may have tolerated little kids when they were younger but if they have arthritis, vision problems, back problems or other painful conditions like poor joints they may not be a tolerant this time around. They probably need to be protected from the baby more than the baby needs protection from them.

The family should start transitioning the dogs over to being fed in their crates now. That way there is no chance that the baby will have an opportunity to get into their food bowl. If they don't have 3 crates do it for the one that has aggression problems. In the crate, bowl put in, door closed. Dog eats, then is let out of the crate and bowl removed.

Little babies and kids make noises like wounded prey. This can arouse a dog's instinct so you want to take precautions.
Really...how long before everyone gets lazy about the muzzle? Because the poor dog can't eat when it's on? It's really not necessary anyway, right?....good doggie!
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Old 02-04-2016, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
3,171 posts, read 2,908,641 times
Reputation: 3529
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
The baby will be living in the house not occasionally visiting.
Yes, I know.

My response was to lhpartridge talking about when she/he has grandkids and them coming to visit. He/she said they would have to think about what to do with their dogs when that time came including giving them away. Why have pets then?
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Old 02-04-2016, 07:34 AM
 
41 posts, read 19,799 times
Reputation: 66
Never leave the child alone in a room even in a crib with the dog around. Be very cautious, but hopefully the dog will love the baby. If there is a good dog trainer around then I would look into that to see if they can help the dog with whatever issues it may be having.
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Old 02-04-2016, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,506 posts, read 15,977,386 times
Reputation: 38909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
i could not agree more with this

when my son was a toddler we went to visit a new friend and her two daughters for a playdate at this other mom's house. she mentioned the dog is in the garage (we heard it in there barking) and she told us that the dog had bitten her infant daughter in the face when she was a newborn. i was speechless with horror as the mom calmly pointed out the scars on her 3-year-old's face, over 20 stitches initially and then "it's required 3 plastic surgeries so far, with two more surgeries to go."

i did ask "you kept the dog?" and the really chilling answer was "oh yes, he's part of the family, we had him long before we had our two children, so we are more attached to him." i could not get out of that house fast enough, and did not ever go back. chilling. the dog part was bad enough. the mom's attitude was terrifying.

I shuddered a little when I read this post.


A little off topic, but...


I knew a couple who had a dog (their "fur baby") for many years before they had a real human child and clearly, clearly treated the dog better than their child. In fact, the child needed years of therapy because he always felt "second best" to the dog. Picture the toddler being locked in a playpen for hours while the mom played with the dog on her lap ignoring her child. All the relatives could see that it was a problem but the parents never realized it and thought that everyone else was over reacting.


Even as an adult, just mentioning the name of the dog, could upset him as he had so many horrible memories from his childhood.
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