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Old 02-04-2016, 08:51 AM
 
13,018 posts, read 12,460,814 times
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Well, if you absolutely cannot in any way move out of the house (that would be my first option - this is your kid's safety we're talking about), I'd say your best bet is to befriend the dog. I have a Catahoula Leopard Hound, and he is not a dog for "casual" dog owners. He is incredibly social, affectionate and good with kids, but I doubt he would be that way if I hadn't worked like hell to train him.

He needs to be exercised. When I take my Houla to the dog park, he chases a ball for hours. He is not the kind of dog to entertain himself in a yard. He wants interaction with his human. So take this dog out and get him playing fetch at a dog park or in the yard. Buy a muzzle and take him for walks. Exhaust him.

Keep tiny treats (cheerios even) in tupperware throughout the house, out of the dogs' reach and reward him when he obeys a command. Go ahead and play tug with him again, but set boundaries - you really have to establish yourself as the boss. When you want him to give you something, you stop all play and interaction until he gives it to you. When he gets overstimulated, end the game.

And when he is around the baby, make it a positive experience when you shoo him away. Tell him to go away and then toss him a treat for listening. Otherwise, he's going to see the kid as an encroachment on his territory. Instead, you'll be associating the baby with good things.

Look, these are great dogs, but they are bred to herd cattle and hunt boar. They are not labrador retrievers. A Catahoula is a working dog that needs a job.

Read some books on training dogs by people like Karen Pryor (clicker training), etc. Also, read some books about introducing dogs to babies and establishing proper boundaries.

Because if you're going to insist on staying in that house, you're going to have to take responsibility for the dog as well as your baby. Otherwise, you're just hoping that an accident doesn't happen.

Actually, your best best for some more complete is to repost this on the Dogs forum - there are several experienced dog trainers posting there. Twelvepaw is a freakin' genius. Listen to whatever she tells you.
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Old 02-04-2016, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,018 posts, read 5,205,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Really...how long before everyone gets lazy about the muzzle? Because the poor dog can't eat when it's on? It's really not necessary anyway, right?....good doggie!
I thought the muzzle idea was a good one, myself, especially if Mom can get the family on board.
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Old 02-04-2016, 09:30 AM
 
2,439 posts, read 3,268,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I thought the muzzle idea was a good one, myself, especially if Mom can get the family on board.
Thanks. Although I posted the basket muzzle idea I really like the suggestion about having the baby mom take the dog to training classes, on walks and doing the in-house training so I repped those posters. The baby mom may not have been a member of the household (in the dog's eyes) when she was bit and the dog saw her as an outsider. Also no details of what happened leading up to it. Was she arguing with her sister, one of the nephews etc.? So much goes into something like that. Since this isn't her house and she is a temporary resident having the family get rid of the dog seems over the top when a few simple not harmful management techniques can assure the baby's safety. But only good things can come of her working with the dog which is why I really liked the training class suggestion.
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Old 02-04-2016, 10:05 AM
 
13,018 posts, read 12,460,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mic111 View Post
Thanks. Although I posted the basket muzzle idea I really like the suggestion about having the baby mom take the dog to training classes, on walks and doing the in-house training so I repped those posters. The baby mom may not have been a member of the household (in the dog's eyes) when she was bit and the dog saw her as an outsider. Also no details of what happened leading up to it. Was she arguing with her sister, one of the nephews etc.? So much goes into something like that. Since this isn't her house and she is a temporary resident having the family get rid of the dog seems over the top when a few simple not harmful management techniques can assure the baby's safety. But only good things can come of her working with the dog which is why I really liked the training class suggestion.
Frankly, I think the dog is grouchy because it's not being worked or given enough structure. LIke you said, not knowing the OP, he may have sought to establish that he's the boss or just been overstimulated. With a Catahoula it is all about boundaries. If this dog hasn't been taught any, it could be disastrous.

My first year with my guy, we spent a of time arguing. He'd bark when he'd want something, and I'd basically force him to jump through some hoops to get it. We went back and forth quite a bit.
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Old 02-04-2016, 11:18 AM
 
1,064 posts, read 3,024,563 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mic111 View Post
Thanks. Although I posted the basket muzzle idea I really like the suggestion about having the baby mom take the dog to training classes, on walks and doing the in-house training so I repped those posters. The baby mom may not have been a member of the household (in the dog's eyes) when she was bit and the dog saw her as an outsider. Also no details of what happened leading up to it. Was she arguing with her sister, one of the nephews etc.? So much goes into something like that. Since this isn't her house and she is a temporary resident having the family get rid of the dog seems over the top when a few simple not harmful management techniques can assure the baby's safety. But only good things can come of her working with the dog which is why I really liked the training class suggestion.
I agree.


OP, I'm sorry, but you need to find another place to live. If someone let me live in their home, I would follow their rules and if someone told me to get rid of my dog, you would be the one kicked out. I know you don't have a place to go, and for that I'm sorry, but you can't just make someone get rid of a pet, especially if you knowingly provoked it.
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Old 02-04-2016, 11:37 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,758,561 times
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All the advice about what the mom-to-be can do with/for the dog is moot.
It is not her dog.
The dog belongs to those she is choosing to live with... choosing to stay with, even after getting bit.

The dog bit her, and nothing was done.
They value the dog over the OP.
They will value the dog over the OP's baby.

And that is their right, as it is their house and their family.

The OP insisting on staying there and bringing a baby into a hazardous situation is the issue. The dog already does not like the OP; I fail to see how the OP can manage to keep the baby safe when she could not keep herself safe.

Last edited by Pitt Chick; 02-04-2016 at 12:14 PM..
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Old 02-04-2016, 12:10 PM
 
12,482 posts, read 13,108,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
The dog bit her, and nothing was done.
They value the dog over the OP.
They will value the dog over the OP's baby.
And that is their right, as it is their house and their family.
in a nutshell
great post
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Old 02-04-2016, 12:22 PM
 
13,018 posts, read 12,460,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
All the advice about what the mom-to-be can do with/for the dog is moot.
It is not her dog.
The dog belongs to those who is choosing to live with... choosing to stay even after getting bit.

The dog bit her, and nothing was done.
They value the dog over the OP.
They will value the dog over the OP's baby.

And that is their right, as it is their house and their family.

The OP insisting on staying there and bringing a baby into a hazardous situation is the issue. The dog already does not like the OP; I fail to see how the OP can manage to keep the baby safe when she could not keep herself safe.
Well, I agree that she needs to leave.

But if the OP is insisting on staying in this situation (and yes, endangering her child), she has to take control of the dog. And the dog "not liking" the OP is likely entirely fixable by becoming the key person in that dog's life. It's obviously not getting proper socialization and training if it's growling at everyone in the house and biting people who are engaged in play with it.

My father had a hunting dog he acquired after I had moved out that wanted to rip my throat out when it met me for no particular reason right from the get-go. It was a tiny little hound that thought I was the devil incarnate. I had never interacted with it in any way, and it was fine with everyone else who came near. We reached the conclusion he had been abused by someone who was female and had a ponytail or something like that. We made no serious attempt to get him over it, because I was wasn't living at home and it seemed to be a freak thing.

Years later, when my father was ill, I ended up taking care of his dogs. The dog in question was still flinging himself at the gate to get at me - keep in mind he was about 30 pounds, if that. After two feeding, he thought I was awesome. Sometimes it's that easy.

Yes, she should find another place. But that doesn't mean one shouldn't provide advice on avoiding a disaster if she doesn't take the primary advice.
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Old 02-04-2016, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Greater LA area
15,747 posts, read 11,767,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABCBLUE View Post
I'm due with my first baby girl in June. Currently live with my sister, BIL and teenage nephews. I can't yet afford a place of my own so have nowhere to go. The only problem is that they have 3 dogs. The 2 were around when my nephews were growing up and are very gentle and sweet. But the newest dog, a catahoula leopard dog, has some issues. Touching him too much provokes him and he growls. He even bit me in the face before which required stitches but I was honestly asking for it. I was playing tug with him and put my face near his.

He does, however, move away if an adult stands up and tells him off. He has never just approached a person and gotten aggressive. If you leave him alone he leaves you alone. But I'm still very concerned about the baby. We all agreed to take extra caution when she is a newborn. Anyone holding the baby must not allow him to come near her and if he does, use authority to make him leave. My room/the nursery area has a door that stays shut at all times and none of the dogs are allowed in there. If God forbid I don't have my own place by the time she walks I'm planning on teaching her to avoid him altogether.

Any other ideas? Please don't say something rude-I don't have a choice but to stay here right now and will whatever necessary to protect my daughter.


Babies shouldn't be around dogs unsupervised no matter how friendly the dog is.


if you get bit by a dog when you know he has issues - your own fault.


You have been taken in by your family, so expecting from them to get rid of the dogs is out of question.


I suggest you move.
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Old 02-04-2016, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Ohio
18,045 posts, read 13,258,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABCBLUE View Post
Any other ideas? Please don't say something rude-I don't have a choice but to stay here right now and will whatever necessary to protect my daughter.
Remember that dogs live in an hierarchical world. Hopefully, none of the dogs are allowed on beds or the couch or other furniture, as that would place the child in further danger.
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