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Old 02-08-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
3,171 posts, read 2,908,641 times
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I have one that will only eat a few things and the other will try most things but goes back to the things they like. Food isn't something I will battle over. It isn't worth it to me. I do agree with the poster that said cut out all the snacks and the kids will then eat whatever you put in front of them. When my one picky kid is truly hungry, he will eat whatever is put in front of him.

I was pretty picky as a child and through my early 20's. I remember sitting at the table for hours because I didn't want to eat what was served and to be honest I still won't eat what was in that hodge podge dish today. My mom was an awful cook. Meat was always cooked beyond what it needed to be. Burgers burnt and steaks beyond medium well. Pork chops so thin and cooked so long they were hockey pucks. I started making my own dinners at around 12.

I was raised in the midwest and moved out east in my early 20's. I went back to my favorite restaurant in my hometown a couple of years ago and couldn't believe how bland the food tasted. I've come a long way. I love sushi, chinese and mexican food. I've tried quite a few new things.
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Old 02-08-2016, 12:16 PM
 
633 posts, read 425,600 times
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I remember hearing a news story on NPR that might be relevant to this one:


Quote:
Want your child to love veggies? Start early. Very early. Research shows that what a woman eats during pregnancy not only nourishes her baby in the womb, but may shape food preferences later in life.
At 21 weeks after conception, a developing baby weighs about as much as a can of Coke and he or she can taste it, too. Still in the womb, the growing baby gulps down several ounces of amniotic fluid daily. That fluid surrounding the baby is actually flavored by the foods and beverages the mother has eaten in the last few hours.
"Things like vanilla, carrot, garlic, anise, mint these are some of the flavors that have been shown to be transmitted to amniotic fluid or mother's milk," says Julie Mennella, who studies taste in infants at the Monell Chemical Senses Center. In fact, Mennella says there isn't a single flavor they have found that doesn't show up in utero. Her work has been published in the journal Pediatrics.

Quote:
But Mennella says that not only is the amniotic fluid and breast milk in humans flavored by food just like cows, but memories of these flavors are formed even before birth. That could result in preferences for these foods or odors for a lifetime. In other words, if you eat broccoli while you're pregnant, there's a much better chance your baby will like broccoli.
Mennella says this had already been observed in rabbits, so she decided to test it in human babies with carrots. Pregnant women were divided into three groups. One group was asked to drink carrot juice every day during their pregnancy, another during breastfeeding and a third to avoid carrots completely. Then when the children began to eat solid food, researchers fed them cereal made either with water, or carrot juice and videotaped their responses.
Things like vanilla, carrot, garlic, anise, mint these are some of the flavors that have been shown to be transmitted to amniotic fluid or mother's milk.

Julie Mennella, who studies taste in infants at the Monell Chemical Senses Center




"And just like the European rabbit, the babies who had experienced carrot in amniotic fluid or mother's milk ate more of the carrot-flavored cereal," says Mennella. "And when we analyzed the video tapes they made less negative faces while eating it."
This makes a lot of evolutionary sense, says Mennella. Since mothers tend to feed their children what they eat themselves, it is nature's way of introducing babies to the foods and flavors that they are likely to encounter in their family and their culture.

Baby's Palate And Food Memories Shaped Before Birth : NPR


Taste preferences apparently start before birth. So if you were the type of person who didn't eat their vegetables/etc while your child was developing, its going to be harder to get them to not be picky eaters when they're older.
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Old 02-08-2016, 12:35 PM
 
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^Very interesting post! I always suspected that what the mother ate later on influenced the child's palate. For example, while I was pregnant with our daughter, I lost my taste for Chinese food. On the other hand, I craved Japanese food. When our daughter was old enough to try Chinese food, she didn't like it but when she tried Japanese food, she immediately took a liking to it!

As for introducing babies to different foods --- I was told by the pediatrician to start her on solids when she was 6 months old---even given a sheet saying when to introduce different foods. The reason for that was to pick up any food allergies. I stuck to the schedule that I was given.
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Old 02-08-2016, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Hmm when I was pregnant all I could eat was salads and fruit but my kid hates tomatoes and is only keen on a few fruits.
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Old 02-08-2016, 02:21 PM
 
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My son's birth mother ate only beans and rice and wild greens while pregnant. He wouldn't touch those with a 10 foot pole (except sushi rice).

I think all the advice to shape kids tastes are nonsense. Really. I fed my kids only healthy foods. Fruits, veggies, lean meats, dairy. I was manic about it. When age 6 hit, both of them got picky like crazy. And neither of them like the same foods, besides a few things. Its maddening but I don't think its anything I did or didn't do.
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Old 02-08-2016, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Central IL
13,472 posts, read 7,173,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spchtx View Post
As infants/toddlers my kids were exposed to a variety of foods, and they both ate most fruits and veggies provided. My husband is a very picky eater, and he hated that his parents "forced" him to eat foods he did not like, so he did not want to go the route of "this is what is what we cooked, if your hungry you will eat." So the kids would started requesting different foods from what was cooked all the time. It drives me crazy, because I can never make a meal that more than 2 people like in my house, and there's almost always a request from all 3 for something to be different. One doesn't like red sauce, or the type of noodles that were cooked, or the way the food looks. I now have them make their own alternative meal, but I don't like that either.

I don't know what came first, the picky eating husband carrying on that gene or the kids just responding to his pickiness and the idea they didn't have to eat what was there. I do truly consider it pickiness for all of them. I used to like to cook, but now I hate to cook. I would much rather eat out, or let everyone fend for themselves. I know this is not ideal, but it is what it is! Fortunately, my husband and I are on the same page for other areas of raising kids, but this one is a battle I have tired of fighting. I will say, my now 14 yo is starting to experiment more, so maybe there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

To make matters worse, both my husband and youngest daughter were diagnosed with Celiac last year, so that has increased the difficulty of fixing meals for everyone.
Ha - when I was a kid my dad usually cooked - and he said "I'm not a short order cook" - so we ate what he gave us. Nope - we couldn't even make ourselves a sandwich if we didn't like it. Yes, we were hungry at meal time because we got no snacks.
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Old 02-08-2016, 09:22 PM
 
383 posts, read 266,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Ha - when I was a kid my dad usually cooked - and he said "I'm not a short order cook" - so we ate what he gave us. Nope - we couldn't even make ourselves a sandwich if we didn't like it. Yes, we were hungry at meal time because we got no snacks.
That's how it was for me growing up, but my mom did the cooking. I remember sitting at the table for an hour because I didn't want to eat what she made one night. That was it. There were no other options. I'm not an exotic eater, but I'll eat most fruits/veggies and a variety of different cuisines. No snails or other slimy foods for me, or parts of the animal that should not be eaten, but other wise I am good.

My family is cajun, and my dad grew up eating every part of the cow or pig. My family did allow for us to say, "No" to most of those "gross" things. When my husband and I started dating I would always tell him to ask what something was before he ate it at my granny's house. She wouldn't volunteer the information, but if asked she would tell you the truth. The only thing I remember her "making" me eat was tongue. I thought I was going to puke, but I think it was more of a texture thing.

My kids are never asked to eat anything remotely close to foods like that, but you would think a plate of broccoli was just as bad!
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Old 02-08-2016, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,285 posts, read 49,863,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
If a child is getting a balanced diet and showing willingness to try new things, I don't see a problem. People's tastes grow and change over time, including children's.

.
Yeah. The problem is most kids really aren't.
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Old 02-09-2016, 11:19 AM
 
1,609 posts, read 2,956,168 times
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For every 10 studies that say one thing you will will find 10 studies that say the opposite. Just feed them good food.
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Old 02-09-2016, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Central, NJ
2,314 posts, read 4,823,420 times
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My son ate absolutely everything until one day - he didn't. It isn't about variety being introduced early.
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